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Thai NGOs Ask Government to Allow Tiger Experts to Help

Thai NGOs Ask Government to Allow Tiger Experts to Help

Network of Thai Non Governmental Organizations on Natural Resources and Environment on the raids and confiscations at the Tiger Temple

June 10th, 2016 

Referring to the actions of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plants (DNP) under the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment at the Tiger Temple from the 30th of May till the 4th of June, resulting in the confiscation and movement of 139 tigers and other protected wild animals that were kept against Thai laws, from the Tiger Temple in Sai Yok, Kanchanaburi Province to facilities of the government, we would like to make the following statement;

The Thai Non Governmental Organizations Network would like to express our appreciation for the way the DNP and other involved agencies have handled the situation, removed the wildlife in a professional way and further investigated and discovered evidence suggesting serious issues of wildlife possession and trafficking as been reported in the media. We are hereby request that the DNP and relevant authorities will press charges against the alleged wrongdoers to the full extent, showing that authorities are serious in tackling the illegal wildlife possession and trade in Thailand.

However, besides the appreciation mentioned above, the Network of Thai Non Governmental Organizations on Natural Resources and Environment would like to express some concerns about the following points;

  1. For the tigers that have been moved from the temple to Khao Son and Khao Prathapchang wildlife breeding centers of the DNP we feel that long-term animal welfare standards and a limited financial budget are of great concern, possibly resulting in an insufficient care.

We therefor would see it favorable to have the DNP allow assistance from and cooperation with Non Governmental Organizations who are ready to help and have experience in caring for wildlife, this under the supervision and leadership of the Department of National Parks. For example an option would be to turn the Tiger Temples premises, after finishing legal procedures and repossession of the land, into an (big) cat education and conservation center as lots of expensive facilities have already been built there. An upgrade of facilities could be implemented to provide a facility up to International standard. Other option are also taken into account.

  1. The discovery of evidence at the tiger temple suggesting illegal trade of wildlife and wildlife parts is that of crimes with profits comparable to the international trade in weapons and drugs. We hereby request to authorities and government to seriously investigate and tackle the international illegal trade in wildlife in Thailand.

–       Adjusting legislation by increasing penalties in both civil and criminal law.

–       Prioritizing the investigation on wrongdoing in the tiger temple case, setting this case as an example, besides the illegal trade allegations, also on money laundering and corruption.

–       Showing International leadership in the Mekong region on tackling the illegal wildlife trade by exchanging information and intelligence with other parties and  strict enforcement  against organized wildlife crimes.

–       Increase financial and logistic support of agencies investigating and enforcing wildlife laws.

–       Speed up improved legislation and ministerial laws on zoo standards and animal registration, with the main aim of transparency and the possibility of easy check-ups. 

Seub Nakhasatien Foundation

www.seub.or.th

 

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

(WFFT) www.wfft.org

 

The Bird Conservation Society of Thailand (BCST)  www.bcst.or.th

    

Love Wildlife Foundation

www.lovewildlife.org

Save Elephant Foundation

www.saveelephantfoundation.org

Thai Animal Guardians Association

(ThaiAGA) www.thaiaga.org

   
Society Against Global Warming Friends of the Asian Elephant Foundation

(FAE) www.friendsoftheasianelephant.org

   
Thai Wetlands Foundation A call for Animal Rights

 

Rak KhaoYai Club Baimai Organization
  www.baimai.org

 

Wildlife Conservation Club

Thailand

 

TonKhla Youth Club Nakorn Nayok
TonKhla Youth Club Lanna Bird Group

 

   
OK Nature Club

www.oknation.net/blog/OKnatureclub

 

 

With best regards,

Edwin Wiek
Founder and Director
Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Telephone  08-90600906
Office  032-458135
Email  edwin.wiek@wfft.org
Skype wildlife_rescue

Website www.wfft.org

www.thaielephantrefuge.org

www.wildlifefriends.nl (Dutch website)
www.facebook.com/WildlifeFriendsFoundation

Address 108 moo 6, tambon Thamairuak
76130 Petchburi
THAILAND

Big Cat Rescue endorses these suggestions.

Howard Baskin

Howard Baskin

HOWARD BASKIN

SECRETARY, TREASURER, ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRMAN AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Howard-Baskin-TigerHoward Baskin is a retired management consultant who worked with early stage and fast growing companies in the areas of strategic planning, finance and operations.  He spent 11 years at Citicorp in various assignments, most recently as Director of Strategic Planning for the Commercial Real Estate Division.  After leaving Citicorp in 1991 he was an equity participant and general manager in three companies, one of which he co-founded.  He now devotes full time to Big Cat Rescue and serves on the Audit Committee.

Other civic activities include serving three years on the Board of Directors of the Upper Tampa Bay Chamber of Commerce and serving as first Chairman of its Performance Oversight and Monitoring Committee and member of it External Relations Committee.  He also is a past member of The Rotary Club of Tampa, serving as Chairman of the Community Service Committee and on the Board of Directors.

Howard received his B.S. cum laude from Union College, Schenectady, NY in 1972, his J.D. cum laude from the University of Miami School of Law in 1978 and his MBA from Harvard Business School in 1980.

Listen to a radio interview with Howard Baskin done by one of the Cox Radio stations in 2012.

Howard met Carole at the launch party for No More Homeless Pets in 2002 and they married in 2004.

Meet the Big Cat Rescue Team. See a typical day at the sanctuary.

 

U.S. News and World Report

Where Work Really Is a Zoo

 

By Kerry Hannon

Posted October 25, 2007

 

Howard Baskin admits that a few homeless cats have won his heart over the years, but saving abandoned and abused lions, lynxes, and leopards was by no means his dream, let alone his passion. When it came to giving to animal causes, he might write a modest check to the Humane Society of the United States. His world was finance and marketing.

Yet there’s no denying that a stroll where he works at the 45-acre Big Cat Rescue, a nonprofit educational sanctuary in Tampa, one of the largest in the world devoted to the big cats, leaves him inspired.

This is where Bengal tigers, African lions, snow leopards, bobcats, and other exotic cats recline gracefully on tree limbs, stretch languidly in their dens, or splash playfully in ponds amid shady oaks and palmettos. In all, there are 140 feline residents with permanent homes here. “Looking at these animals and realizing that I’ve been able to make a difference in the quality of their lives and securing their future is wonderful,” he says.

Baskin, 57, isn’t one of the cats’ caregivers, but he uses his financial acumen to ensure they live a healthful life. With a Harvard M.B.A. and a law degree, he spent the first 11 years of his career at Citicorp, rising to become director of strategic planning for the commercial real-estate division in New York. “Working in a small business had always been my plan, but I kept getting interesting jobs at the bank,” he recalls.

Finally, in 1991, he left Citi to work as a management consultant for a succession of small companies. Eight years later, he opted for a less stressful pace, consulting part time and freeing up time for tennis and leisurely rounds of golf. But something was missing.

And in 2003, just a few years into his semiretired bachelor life, he did an about-face. Before he knew it, he had ramped up to 60-hour workweeks at the sanctuary and agreed to take charge of its finances free. Sure, Baskin is fond of the cats, but it was another love that inspired him. His wife, Carole, whom he met in 2002 and married in 2004, founded the 15-year-old sanctuary and is ceo.

“I kind of married into this transition, although it was of course my choice, not a requirement,” Baskin says. “I fell in love with her. One thing that drew me to her was her passion for the mission and the excitement of working for a cause, not just living.”

Take Nikita, for example. The 6-year-old lioness spent her first year living on a concrete slab, chained to a wall by a drug dealer in Nashville. She was discovered in a raid and arrived at Big Cat five years ago with sores on her elbows the size of tennis balls.

Purrfect fit. Not all of the cats were abused. Some were abandoned by owners who could no longer afford to care for them. Others were retired from circus acts, rescued from fur farms, or obtained from roadside zoos that had fallen on hard times. Baskin came well prepared to bolster the sanctuary’s shaky financial underpinnings. The small firms where he used to work ran the gamut from a bridge builder to a foundry to an audiovisual firm. They were businesses where finances were in disarray when he arrived. Someone had to figure out how to get things organized and create systematic controls.

Visitors who take educational tours of Big Cat have doubled since 2003, to 26,000 last year. Revenues from contributions rose 50 percent in 2006 alone. The annual Fur Ball, the chief fundraiser, brought in an estimated $100,000 in October, up from $17,000 five years ago. Carole has had time to advocate for laws to crack down on illegal animal dealers and implement humane care standards for the cats.

Although Baskin would like to spend a bit more time on the golf course, there’s little other downside. His full-time consulting income, which often topped six figures, had already been trimmed, and he had a thrifty lifestyle, enough savings, and growing retirement funds.

“I don’t take a traditional salary, but, in reality, I get a double payback. I not only get to do something for the cats,” he says as he watches Nikita devour her afternoon “bloodsicle” snack. “I feel like I am contributing to the world. More importantly, I get to make Carole happy. That’s my No. 1 goal.” Spoken like a true newlywed.

http://www.usnews.com/articles/business/careers/2007/10/25/where-work-really-is-a-zoo.html“I don’t take a traditional salary, but, in reality, I get a double payback. I not only get to do something for the cats,” he says as he watches Nikita devour her afternoon “bloodsicle” snack. “I feel like I am contributing to the world. More importantly, I get to make Carole happy. That’s my No. 1 goal.” Spoken like a true newlywed.

Tiger Trade Panel EU 2016

Tiger Trade Panel EU 2016

INVITATION TO TIGER TRADE EVENT AT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

 

TIGER trade is a serious and pressing threat to the last of the world’s wild tigers and the London-basedEnvironmental Investigation Agency (EIA) – together with partners Education for Nature – Vietnam(ENV) and Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI) – is calling on the European Union to take urgent action to tackle it.

On Wednesday, May 25, 2016, Neena Gill MEP (West Midlands) will host an event to highlight the issue at the European Parliament in Brussels at which EIA, ENV and WPSI will give insights into the situation on the ground in China, Vietnam, India and other countries, and discuss practical policy measures the EU can take.

The purpose is to showcase the plight of wild tigers and the threat posed by tiger ‘farming’, and to ensure Indian and Vietnamese civil society perspectives are heard.

All three NGOs believe the EU can play a critical role in helping to end the demand for, and trade in, tigers and other Asian big cats.

The global wild tiger population is likely little higher than 3,200; however, in the absence of completed scientific population surveys across all range countries it is difficult to establish an accurate estimate. In contrast, there are more than twice that number of captive tigers in ‘tiger farms’ in China, Thailand, Vietnam and Laos – facilities which stimulate demand for tiger parts and undermine enforcement efforts.

WHAT:          Panel Discussion on Tiger Trade

WHEN:         16:30-18:30 on Wednesday, May 25, 2016

WHERE:         Meeting Room ASP 3H1, European Parliament, Brussels, Belgium

RSVP:            neena.gill@europarl.europa.eu

 

 

 

CONTACTS FOR MEDIA:

 

• Ms Debbie Banks, EIA – debbiebanks@eia-international. org

• Ms Shruti Suresh, EIA – shrutisuresh@eia- international.org

• Mrs Nguyen Dung, ENV – dungnguyen.env@gmail.com

• Ms Belinda Wright, WPSI – belinda@wpsi-india.org

 

 

 

EDITORS’ NOTES

 

1. The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) is a UK- and Washington DC-based Non-Governmental Organisation that investigates and campaigns against a wide range of environmental crimes, including illegal wildlife trade, illegal logging, hazardous waste, and trade in climate and ozone-altering chemicals. More information here: https://eia-international.org/

2. Education for Nature – Vietnam (ENV) is the country’s first NGO focused on the conservation of nature and protection of the environment: More information here. http://envietnam.org/index.php

3. Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI) is one of the most effective wildlife conservation organisations in India, providing support and information to government authorities to combat illegal wildlife trade, particularly in wild tigers. More information here: http://www.wpsi-india.org/wpsi/index.php

4. More information on the tiger trade is available here. https://eia-international.org/our-work/environmental-crime-and-governance/illegal-wildlife-trade/illegal-trade-seizures-tigers-asian-big-cats

5. More information on tiger farming is available here: https://eia-international.org/where-are-the-tigers

 

 

 

 

Environmental Investigation Agency
62-63 Upper Street
London N1 0NY
UK
www.eia-international.org
Tel: +44 207 354 7960

Jamie Veronica

Jamie Veronica

JAMIE VERONICA BOORSTEIN

PRESIDENT, VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE, BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Jamie Veronica

Jamie Veronica is President of Big Cat Rescue, a member of the Board of Directors, and Chair of the Volunteer Committee.  She has served in these capacities for well over ten years. She spent many years developing a sponsorship program whose financial success continues to contribute largely toward meeting our annual budget.

Jamie runs everything involved with the administrative side of the volunteer program including processing promotion applications, running hour reports, follow up with volunteers regarding their hours or classes, keeping the coordinators up to date on volunteers in need of training, keeping our policies and training classes up to date so that our people and animals are safe, coordinates rescues, runs our online gift shop and eBay store, manages the foster kitten program, including scheduling veterinary care, manages enclosure maintenance, coordinates our fundraising events and special online efforts.

2011JamieActionFigurePortraitPaintingAn award-winning photographer, Jamie is the staff photographer and publishes our quarterly Big Cat Times newspaper, distributed to over 80,000 readers.  She creates all of our print and web advertisements, billboards, brochures, books, donor plaques and signage.  She manages all of the discount offers and reciprocal agreements with other attractions. She designed and initially implemented the sanctuary’s worldwide Internship Program.

Jamie is also a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and manages the sanctuary’s bobcat rehab program.  She has successfully raised, rehabilitated and released many wild Florida bobcats and leads expeditions into the release sites to track and camera trap wild bobcat populations.  She oversees and handles all rescues, veterinary procedures, transfer of animals on the property, and regulatory compliance issues.  Jamie Carole’s daughter, Vernon and Barbara’s grand daughter and is married to Dr. Justin Boorstein, DVM.

Meet the Big Cat Rescue Team. See a typical day at the sanctuary.

See Jamie and Dr. Justin’s wild life here:  https://vimeo.com/41566377

 

 

Newsweek

Bred for profit, the animals are often cruelly deformed by inbreeding.

July 28, 2010
by Ravi SomaiyaAlmost all of America’s 7,000 tigers are born and raised here. Reports from tiger farms suggest there are many unscrupulous breeders, and activists allege that the trade is cruel. What’s clear is that tigers are often kept in small pens, people die when safety is lax, and the cats are hideously inbred to produce valuable white cubs.The trade is not illegal, though a recent law bans the sale or trade of big cats across state lines for the pet trade. But breeders exploit a patchwork of state-by-state rules, and loopholes, to continue to sell cubs. People who rescue unwanted or mistreated tigers estimate that the number of breeders might be in the hundreds. Several alleged traders contacted by NEWSWEEK refused to be interviewed, perhaps because in recent years many operations have been shut down by authorities.

One of the biggest, Savage Kingdom, in Florida, was closed by the Department of Agriculture in 2006. Several accidents had occurred there. In 2001 a handyman named Vincent Lowe went into a cage to repair a dangerously worn-down gate. Colleagues had to watch as a 318-pound male tiger, Tijik, “ripped out [his] throat,” according to the USDA report. They could not rescue him for fear of being attacked themselves.

Jamie Veronica BoorsteinThe tiger was eventually shot by Savage Kingdom’s octogenarian owner, Robert Baudy, who had been in the tiger trade for many decades—he’d even been on The Ed Sullivan Show promoting his animals. “He was from an era before animal welfare,” says Jamie Veronica, who is with the charity Big Cat Rescue and went into the farm after it was closed to try to remove and resettle dozens of tigers (all were eventually moved safely). “When he started out, people just saw animals as a commodity, a way to make money.” The USDA report blamed Baudy for safety failures that led to Lowe’s death. He could not be reached for comment at a number listed for him.Baudy specialized in white tigers, which sell for up to $20,000 per cub. But white tigers are rare genetic mutations, not a different species. According to the San Diego Zoo, every American white tiger is descended from a single father. New cubs must be inbred further. For every healthy, valuable cub, it is thought that many are born with ailments like shortened tendons, club foot, kidney problems, malformed backbones, contorted necks, and twisted faces.

Emily McCormack, a zoologist at Turpentine Creek, a refuge in Arkansas that rescues unwanted or abused big cats, has taken in several deformed cubs. “People don’t want these tigers because they don’t look perfect,” she says. “Who’s to say how many have been born with deformities that have been killed instead of rescued?” Activists also campaign against so-called white-tiger-conservation programs, whose very descriptions, says McCormack, are misleading: “They will never be returned to the wild. They don’t really exist in the wild.”

Siegfried & Roy, the illusionist duo, are famous for their white tigers. They claim on their Web site that they have 38. “For more than 20 years,” they say, “we have been entrusted with the care and preservation of the Royal White Tigers.” A spokesperson for the two did not return calls for comment about their breeding program. A statement from the Mirage Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, which houses many of Siegfried & Roy’s white tigers in an attraction called the Secret Garden, did not directly address the possibility that the program may have bred deformed cubs. It did say that “breeding is done responsibly under strict genetic management.” The Mirage did not respond to NEWSWEEK’s request for more information.

 

http://www.newsweek.com/2010/07/27/inside-america-s-tiger-breeding-farms.html

Jamie Justin Hurley Wedding

Transparency Notification:

In their role as a current board member this person is not independent and is a voting member in 2016.

 

Cranimals

Cranimals

Veterinary Trial Confirms That Cranimals UTI Supplement Equivalent to Antibiotics

Cranimals reports that its Cranimals Original Urinary Tract Pet Supplement was independently tested in Taiwan and had a 100% success rate in the prevention of canine Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) caused by E. Coli.

Orphaned Bobcat KittenVANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, April 27, 2016(Newswire.com) – An independent in vivo and in vitro veterinary study published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research [77(4), 2016], compared Cranimals Original UTI supplement to the antibiotic cephalexin. Based on both clinical signs and laboratory urinanalysis, none of the dogs receiving Cranimals Original  developed a UTI. All dogs were expected to contract a UTI during the 6 month experimental period based on their medical histories.

Scanning Electron Microscopy confirmed that Cranimals Original significantly reduced the ability of E Coli to attach to canine kidney/uroepithelial cells, and this effect became more pronounced, the longer Cranimals Original was administered. There is general consensus that E Coli successfully infects the urinary tract of animals and humans by adhering to the uroepithelium, preventing it from being flushed out via urine flow, one of the bladders’ most important defenses.

Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are common in dogs and cats, and pet UTIs are typically treated with antibiotics. This easily leads to the overuse and misuse of these antibiotic drugs. Pathogens like E Coli are rapidly becoming resistant to many antibiotics used in veterinary and human medicine. The transfer of these antibiotic resistant strains of E coli between animals and humans is concerning. Bacterial resistance also leads to unresolved or recurrent urinary tract infections; infection related complications (struvite stones, urinary blockage, renal damage), and increased economic costs (repeated treatments). The widespread use of natural therapies such as Cranimals Original, to help reduce antibiotic use is crucial to ensure conventional drug therapies remain effective.

Cranimals Original has been used successfully by integrated veterinary care practitioners. It is ideal to prevent recurrent infections and in pets at high risk of developing UTIs (bladder cancer, diabetes, polypoid cystitis, compromised immune systems) without the long terms use of antibiotics. This study adds further scientific validation for its use in conventional veterinary practice, and substantiates Cranimals as the leader in natural urinary tract remedies for dogs, puppies and cats.

About the Animals behind Cranimals

Cranimals Pet Supplements is a privately owned, Canadian company, based in Vancouver, BC and manufactures a variety of cat and dog supplements, and distributes diagnostic tests used by consumers to diagnose UTIs, diabetes and kidney failure at home.

For more information please contact Cranimals.
Cranimals and the Cranimals logo are registered global Trademarks.