Declawed Cougar Shot After Killing Dog

Declawed Cougar Shot After Killing Dog

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MUSKOKA, ONT. – Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources has confirmed that an animal killed by police on the weekend was a cougar, long believed extinct in the province.

Police were called after the large cat killed a family dog in the Muskoka area.

Declawed Cougar Kills Dog

Declawed Cougar Kills Dog

There have been thousands of believed sightings of cougars in Ontario over the past few years, but this marks the first confirmed cougar killed in the province since 1884. (more…)

Tiger cub killed by wild dogs in Chanda

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CHANDRAPUR: Yet another tiger was added to the death toll in Chandrapur district on Friday. A pack of wild dogs reportedly killed a tiger cub in Dhaba range in Gondpipri tehsil in the afternoon. Forests in Chandrapur district have lost in all seven tigers this year now.

 

The patrolling squad discovered the partially eaten carcass of the tiger cub in compartment no. 561, near village Vejgaon in Dhaba range under Central Chanda forest division, during routine patrolling in the afternoon. It appears that a pack of wild dogs brought down the tiger cub and eat the rear portion of its body.

 

“Forest watchers recruited for patrolling saw the pack of wild dogs eating the carcass. The dogs fled when the watchers approached the dead body. They also discovered a large number of wild dog pug marks in the area,” said ACF Pradeep Kottewar.

 

Sources claimed that the cub is aged around eight months and measured around 80cm in length. Sex of the cub however could not be learnt as its genitals had been eaten by the dogs. Forest officers have ruled out poaching, claiming that its body parts like teeth and nails are intact, while skin has been damaged as carcass was eaten by wild dogs. The dead body of the cub was fresh and forest officials suspect that the cub was killed not long before it was detected by the patrolling squad.

 

DCF, Central Chanda division, Madan Kulkarni and his subordinates rushed to the spot on getting information. Veterinary doctor PM Kadukar was summoned for post mortem at the spot. Wildlife activist Bandu Dhotre was present as representative of PCCF and honorary wildlife warden of Gadchiroli Mahendra Singh Chavan was summoned as representative of NTCA to witness the post mortem.

 

So far six tigers, one each in every month, have died in Chandrapur district this year. First tiger was poached through electrocution in Jharan range of FDCM and its partially decomposed carcass sans all four paws was discovered on January 23. Second tiger was found dead in suspicious condition in Lohara teak research centre on February 18. Forest officers claimed it was a hit and run case, but possibility of electrocution was not ruled out. Third tiger was found dead near village Kitadi in Moharli Forest Range (Territorial) on March 1. Its body was decomposed and forest officers termed it as natural death.

 

Fourth tiger was killed in steel jaw trap laid by poachers in Palasgaon range on April 26, while one more was maimed for life in another trap at the same spot. Fifth tiger was poached and its body sans head and paws and chopped into 11 pieces was thrown near Borda village in Chandrapur range on May 18. This killing of tiger cub allegedly by wild dogs has taken the tiger death toll in Chandrapur to six this year. Last year four tigers had died in the district.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Tiger-cub-killed-by-wild-dogs-in-Chanda/articleshow/14512292.cms

 

Partially eaten tiger cub found by forest patrol

PTI | 09:06 PM,Jun 29,2012

Chandrapur, Jun 29 (PTI) A tiger cub was found dead in the Dhaba Range of forests, located in the Gondpipri tehsil of the district on Friday. A partially eaten body of a tiger cub was found by a patrol out on routine duty near village Vejgaon in the Dhaba Range under Central Chanda Division, on Friday afternoon, the Assistant Conservator of Forests Pradeep B Kottewar said. “It appears that the tiger cub came under attack by a pack of wild dogs. The cub appears to be around eight months old and it is difficult to ascertain whether it was a male or a female cub, as its hind portion has been eaten away. The carcass appears to be fresh and the patrol might have noticed it only after a few hours of the attack. We have also found foot marks of wild dogs around the carcass,” he said. Deputy Conservator of Forests (Central Chanda Division) Madan Kulkarni, along with his team of officials including veterinarian P M Kadukar has rushed to the spot for further investigations.

 

http://ibnlive.in.com/generalnewsfeed/news/partially-eaten-tiger-cub-found-by-forest-patrol/1018314.html

WORLDS SMALLEST CAT SPECIES SPOTTED AT INDIAN TIGER RESERVE

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By Kelli Bender Jun 27th 2012

The big cats of India received some unexpected, pint-sized visitors. According to theDeccan Chronicle, two rusty-spotted cats were seen pawing around the Sariska Tiger Reserve in Rajasthan.

Activists and wildlife officials are excited that this adorable duo was seen out and about, because rusty-spotted cats are extremely rare. The smallest species of cat, the rusty-spotted cat measures around 13 to 18 inches long and weighs between two and three-and-a-half pounds. Aside from being rare, this species is also very shy, which makes it even more surprising that two volunteers spotted these tiny animals wandering around a big-cat reserve. The volunteers even managed to capture the encounter on camera.

The rusty-spotted cat has been recorded in the wild several times, but aside from this new footage, very few have seen the animal outside captivity. The species is native to Sri Lanka and India, and is protected by both countries. Hopefully, conservation efforts will lead to more rusty-spotted-cat sightings in the future.

http://www.pawnation.com/2012/06/27/worlds-smallest-cat-spotted-at-indian-tiger-reserve/#page=1

Google scientists find evidence of machine learning in recognizing cats

Google scientists find evidence of machine learning in recognizing cats

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A neural network created by connecting 16,000 computer processors appears to support biologists’ theories on how the human brain identifies objects. Hint: It’s all about the cats.

 

Google scientists working in the company’s secretive X Labs have made great strides in using computers to simulate the human brain.

 

Best known for inventing self-driving cars and augmented-reality eyewear, the lab created a neural network for machine learning by connecting 16,000 computer processors and then unleashed it on the Internet. Along the way, the network taught itself to recognize cats.

 

While the act of finding cats on the Internet doesn’t sound all that challenging, the network’s performance exceeded researchers’ expectations, doubling its accuracy rate in identifying objects from a list of 20,000 items, according to a New York Times report.

 

To find the cats, the team fed the network thumbnail images chosen at random from more than 10 billion YouTube videos. The results appeared to support biologists’ theories that suggest that neurons in the brain are trained to identify specific objects.

 

“We never told it during the training, ‘This is a cat,'” Google fellow Jeff Dean told the newspaper. “It basically invented the concept of a cat.”

 

Falling computing costs has led to significant advancements in areas of computer science such as machine vision, speech recognition, and language translation, The Times noted.

 

Machine learning is useful for improving translation algorithms and semantic understanding and a favorite topic of Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, according to Google.

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57460267-76/google-scientists-find-evidence-of-machine-learning/

Michael Jacksons tiger dies of lung cancer at Shambala

Michael Jacksons tiger dies of lung cancer at Shambala

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LOS ANGELES — Thriller, a tiger that belonged to Michael Jackson when the entertainer lived at Neverland, has died of lung cancer at Tippi Hedren’s wildlife preserve near Los Angeles.

 

Hedren says the 13-year-old, 375-pound tiger died June 11. An autopsy was performed and the tiger was cremated.

 

Hedren says Thriller and brother Sabu were born in 1998 and lived with Jackson until 2006 when Jackson left Neverland. Jackson’s veterinarian asked Hedren to take the cats at her Shambala Preserve in Acton. She says a $79,000 compound was built on a lake and Thriller had a great life with Sabu.

 

Despite Jackson’s love of animals, Hedren says he never called to check on the tigers and never sent any money to help pay for their care.

 

Jackson died in June 2009.

 

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/27/4593865/michael-jacksons-tiger-dies-of.html#storylink=cpy

Caged cougar bites Newark social worker in Pataskala

Caged cougar bites Newark social worker in Pataskala

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Caged cougar bites Newark social worker

at Evelyn Shaw’s home in Pataskala, OH

 

Social worker was assessing home for child placement; charges not filed

 

snarl-growl-mad-Cougar-Mountain-Lion-Puma-CODY4PATASKALA — A caged mountain lion bit a social worker Monday in the city, but whether charges will be filed was unknown as of Tuesday.

 

According to a Pataskala police report, Evelyn Shaw, who lives at 13262 Cleveland Road, was showing an employee from Licking County Job and Family Services, identified as Cindy K. Robson, 51, of Newark, around her home.

 

Robson was there, according to the police report, to assess the home to place two children there.

 

Shaw took Robson to her backyard, where Shaw keeps a mountain lion in a cage. Shaw reportedly told the social worker the mountain lion had no teeth, according to the police report, but when Robson was walking next to the cage, the mountain lion bit one of her fingers, drawing blood, according to the report.

 

Robson and Shaw then went to Mount Carmel East Hospital, where Robson was treated and released.

 

Police reported the incident to Bill Bullard, the state wildlife officer and supervisor in charge of six counties, including Licking County.

 

Pataskala Police, as of Tuesday, had not filed any charges related to the case. Police Chief Bruce Brooks said charges might be unlikely if Robson stuck her hand inside or near the mountain lion’s cage.

 

John Fisher, director of Licking County Job and Family Services, said Tuesday he was aware of the incident. Fisher said he could not comment on why Robson was at home because of privacy laws, but according to a 10TV report, Shaw is seeking custody of her two 3-year-old nieces.

 

“What you have in the police report is basically what you have,” he said.

 

Fisher did say social workers have had run-ins with dogs but not mountain lions.

 

“We’ve ran into situations with dogs and other animals you’d expect, but nothing with this type of situation before,” said Fisher, adding Robson had not returned to work Tuesday.

 

Bullard, meanwhile, said current state law places exotic animal oversight in the hands of the local sheriff’s offices, and the Licking County Sheriff’s Office had been sent a copy of the Pataskala Police report on the incident.

 

Gov. John Kasich signed a new exotic animals bill earlier this month that will place the oversight of exotic animals in the hands of the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Bullard said.

 

Senate Bill 310, which Kasich signed, requires the owners of large cats, bears and other exotic animals to register them by Jan. 1, 2014. It also requires background checks for owners, the purchase of liability insurance or surety bonds and mandates owners properly contain their exotic animals.

 

Owners also must post signs warning people exotic animals are on their property.

 

Shaw has expressed her opposition to the bill in hearings.

 

A board member for the U.S. Zoological Association and Uniting a Politically Proactive Exotic Animal League, she long has been a proponent of exotic animal ownership and has helped agencies track down escaped exotic animals.

 

In 2003, two of her African servals escaped from her home. The cats, which looked like small cheetahs and are relatively small and timid, prompted a search, led by police, according to Advocate archives.

 

The pair eventually ran in front of passing traffic, were struck and died from their injuries.

 

Since that time, Shaw has spoken on several occasions before Pataskala City Council in opposition to placing greater restrictions on the ownership of exotic animals.

 

Shaw did not return calls from The Advocate requesting comment.

 

http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20120627/NEWS01/206270304/Caged-mountain-lion-bites-Newark-social-worker-Pataskala