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Lions rip boy to shreds on S. African game farm

19/06/2007 08:03 - (SA) Linda de Beer, Beeld Vryburg - All that remained of a nine-year-old boy who was caught and eaten by lions on a farm in the Boshoek/Bray area in North West on Sunday, was a small piece of his skull. Police spokesperson Charlize van der Linden said Tsepo Gearupi apparently put his arm through the gate of the lion enclosure, where one of the lions grabbed him and pulled him into the camp. Van der Linden said farmworkers went to the lion enclosures on Sunday afternoon to see the animals and take photos. The children Read More

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Haunted by floods, Sundarbans’ tiger stalks humans

Haunted by floods, Sundarbans' tiger stalks humans Sunderbans (Bangladesh), July 4: Flushed out of their natural habitat and deprived of food by floods and Cyclone Sidr, the famed Royal Bengal tiger that roams these mangrove forests is desperately on the prowl. At least 11 people, including two from a single family, have been killed in tiger attacks in the past month in the Munsiganj area of Satkhira district adjoining India's West Bengal state. Villagers in the marshy forests of the Sunderbans, which are spread over Bangladesh and India, Read More

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Adopt a tiger programme ‘more important than ever’

Adopt a tiger programme 'more important than ever'  By staff writers 6 Jul 2008 Wild tigers may soon be a thing of the past, unless urgent action is taken, such as more people adopting a tiger and supporting work for their protection. Numbers of tigers on a wildlife reserve in Nepal have been decimated by poachers, reports the Daily Telegraph, making it more important than ever that people adopt tigers. The Bengal tiger population at the Suklaphanta Reserve has been cut by at least 30 per cent in the last few years, according to Read More

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Tigers released to play mating game – and rescue species

Tigers released to play mating game – and rescue species  By Andrew Buncombe in Delhi Tuesday, 8 July 2008 In the wilds of an Indian nature reserve, a soap opera is gripping the nation. The hero of the drama is a four-year-old male tiger who was flown to the Rajasthan park by wildlife officials and released last week. Yesterday, the heroine, a similarly aged female, was also set free from a holding pen inside the reserve. Now it is up to the two cats to play their parts. "This is a real attempt to try and do something to help the Read More

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Palamau tigers await DNA test

Palamau tigers await DNA test ANEETA SHARMA  Ranchi, July 15: DNA fingerprinting would be used to determine if there are any tigers left in Palamau Tiger Reserve. While the project authorities insist that there was a strong possibility of having approximately 30 tigers in the core area of the reserve, others say that there was none, as the striped beast had not been sighted recently. The reserve recently started a project in collaboration with the Union science and technology ministry and the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Read More

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Royal Bengal tigress “Ananya”

This photo taken in May 2009 shows seven-year-old Royal Bengal tigress "Ananya" Indian Royal Bengal Tiger 'Gaurav' walks in an open enclosure  Indian Royal Bengal Tigress 'Nidhi' sits in a cage at The Indroda Nature Park in Gandhinagar  On an average, poachers kill 30 tigers every year in guarded reserves in India      Read More

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Tigers on verge of extinction in the wild, World Wildlife Fund warns

Tigers on verge of extinction in the wild, World Wildlife Fund warns February 10, 2010 11:49 a.m. EST (CNN) -- Tigers could become extinct in the wild in less than a generation, the World Wildlife Fund warned Wednesday as it launched a campaign to save them. The number of tigers in the wild has dwindled to 3,200 -- less than the number held in captivity in the United States alone, the campaigners said. "There is a real threat of losing this magnificent animal forever in our lifetime," said Sybille Klenzendorf, director of the WWF-US Read More