Cat Meets Catamount

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Cat Meets Catamount

Zeus, an 11-year-old Maine Coon cat, had a curious encounter with a young mountain lion in Boulder, with the pair safely separated by a sliding glass door.

The cats checked each other out at about 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the Pine Brook Hills area of Boulder. Gail Loveman, Zeus’s owner, said she was busy in the office of her home when she heard a noise and turned to see a young mountain lion on the porch.

  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
  • Mountain Lion Checks Out Cat
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Lion Fights

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Lion Fights

This young lion performed a backflip as it escaped the claws of a vicious lioness who slashed it across the face.

British photographer Elliott Neep watched as the lioness approached a zebra carcass to feast with her two cubs in the Masai Mara, Kenya.

But juveniles from a different pride dared to come too close and the protective mother lashed out in anger.

Flipping amazing: The lion cub acrobatically spins out of a grip the lioness had on himFlipping amazing: The lion cub acrobatically spins out of a grip the lioness had on him

Mr Neep , from near Wantage, Oxon, said: ‘A lioness approached the scene with her two two-month old cubs bouncing around and running about.

‘By this time there wasn’t a great deal left on the bones because two pride males and the rest of the pride had had their fill.

‘Three juvenile lions also moved into the kill but the lioness did not like this at all.

‘She began growling and roaring at them, but they simply looked up and carried on eating.

‘The cubs sat down in the grass as their mother went in closer.

 

 

The 36-year-old continued: ‘Across the carcass, just inches from each other, the mother and the juveniles snarled and growled even more aggressively.

‘This time, the younger lions began to back down and edged backwards keeping their eyes on the lioness.

The biggest lioness manages to claw the young lion around the faceThe biggest lioness manages to claw the young lion around the face

 

After the backflip the cub retreats as the lioness growls at the young pretenderAfter the backflip the cub retreats as the lioness growls at the young pretender

‘One young male turned his back to leave then all hell broke loose.

‘The lioness flew across the carcass, clawing and swiping at all three of them.

‘They ran for their lives but the lioness caught one in the shoulder with one claw and it span around.

‘With the other paw, she smashed it across the muzzle and it flipped over to release the claws now hooked in its skin.

The lioness's own cubs claw at her - but she doesn't seem to mind too muchThe lioness’s own cubs claw at her – but she doesn’t seem to mind too much

 

On the prowl: The lioness walks on after winning the battleOn the prowl: The lioness walks on after winning the battle

‘The juvenile can be seen spinning in mid-air, kung-fu style. The youngster got to its feet and fled, chased now by the pride males.

‘The lioness stood riveted to the spot just shaking with fury. It was over in seconds.

‘Just seeing the body language and pure rippling aggression in these animals is enough to give you chills and shivers.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2050477/Jungle-gym-The-lion-cub-does-backflips.html#ixzz1bLHbwfwu

Pet mountain lion mauls child

Pet mountain lion mauls child

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Pet mountain lion mauls child

Owners told to replace cage in July

Typical Mountain Lion Cage

Typical Mountain Lion Cage

October 17, 2011 10:59 AM
BY JON VANDERLAAN

A 4-year-old boy was mauled by a pet mountain lion Sunday afternoon, but no charges have been filed and definitive answers about the legality of the animal being kept as a pet have been elusive.

 

The boy received lacerations and puncture wounds on his left side, including a bite mark on the left side of his face during the attack around 3:15 p.m. Sunday in West Odessa, Sgt. Gary Duesler with the Ector County Sheriff’s Office said.

 

He was taken to Medical Center Hospital, but neither his name nor his condition was available Monday.

 

Amber Michelle Couch, 9450 W. 26th St., who owned the mountain lion, was given a citation for not keeping up with the vaccines on the animal, Cpl. Sherrie Carruth with the Odessa Police Department said. According to a neighbor and family member, Couch is the boy’s aunt.

 

That woman who identified herself as a family member of the two women involved – the mountain lion’s owner and the mother of the child – said the mother of the child did not want a story to run in the newspaper about it and that the family would not speak about it.

 

Duesler said Monday morning that the county would not pursue any criminal charges and would defer to the city for any such charges, but Carruth said the house is outside of the city’s jurisdiction.

 

“Our animal control is hoping they would follow up on endangerment charges for the child,” Carruth said.

 

Because animal control officers are not licensed peace officers, Carruth said they could not do anything more than cite the owner.

 

After several calls between the two agencies, during which neither would claim responsibility for taking further potential legal action, Sheriff Mark Donaldson changed the tone and did not rule out charges.

 

Donaldson said the investigation has not yielded any evidence to suggest a criminal charge is warranted, but the office will continue to work with the district and county attorney offices to determine whether charges can be filed.

 

The mountain lion was being held in a cage just behind the fence line on the property’s front yard, somewhat obstructed from street view by tall bushes.

 

Carruth said the 12-year-old mountain lion, which weighed about 150 lbs., was euthanized and its head is being sent to a lab to test for rabies.

 

“He was in a cage that had large openings,” she said. “So if you stood close to it, he could reach out.”

 

In fact, the cage was a point of scrutiny during an animal control visit in July, Carruth said, when the owners of the cat were told the cage was too small and gaps in the cage were too large.

 

Carruth said the owners did nothing to fix the problems, resulting in the attack.

 

But despite previous statements by Carruth earlier Monday that it was legal for the woman to have the animal on her property, the Odessa American discovered that Texas and county laws declare dangerous animals such as that in unincorporated areas must be registered, and even then owners must adhere to a strict set of rules.

 

The animal wasn’t registered, although Carruth said the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department told animal control in July that it did not need to be.

 

Chris Mitchell, a spokesman with the TPWD, said there would be no circumstance under which the department would advise anyone they did not need a permit for a mountain lion.

 

Even in the certain situations when a permit may be issued, such as for research or rehabilitation, he said the TPWD does not issue such permits and that would be left to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services.

 

“You have to have a reason to have a mountain lion like that,” he said.

 

A man who would only identify himself as James is a neighbor and said he heard the commotion Sunday and was the person who called 9-1-1.

 

“I heard someone say, ‘He’s got him.’ That’s all I heard, just screaming and chaos,” he said. “And you could hear them saying, ‘Somebody call 9-1-1. Somebody get a gun.’”

 

It was then he said he told his wife and children to go inside, fearing for their safety if someone fired a gun or if the mountain lion got loose.

 

James said he saw the boy being carried into the ambulance and also saw the mountain lion carried into an animal control truck. He said it took two men to lift the cat.

 

Despite having never seen the mountain lion before, James said his wife told him she heard the animal roar but he didn’t believe her.

 

He said with a laugh he believes her now.

 

http://www.oaoa.com/news/mountain-74079-lion-kept.html

Leopard kills girl and injures man in Nagbhid India

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Leopard kills girl and injures man in Nagbhid India

CHANDRAPUR: A leopard killed a minor girl and mauled a man trying to rescue her near Kunghada Chak village in Nagbhid tehsil on Friday night. Forest officials have put two cages in the area to capture the beast.

Nagbhid range forest officer KD Meshram said that at around 7.30pm deceased Pranali Saosagade (8) along with some women, had gone to nearby field to answer nature’s call. A leopard that had strayed from the jungle was lurking in bushes. It pounced on Pranali and dragged her to a discarded hut around 50 metres from the spot. The women accompanying Pranali raised an alarm and a huge mob gathered at the spot in no time.

Angry villagers tracked the leopard to the hut, where it was sitting over the kill. As they tried to scare the beast away and snatch the body, the leopard retaliated . “Among the rescuers Manik Chaudhari was attacked by the leopard. He sustained injuries on hand and waist. The leopard then fled from the spot leaving the body in the hut,” said Meshram. Injured Chaudhari was rushed to Nagpur for treatment, he added.

Meshram said that the leopard might have strayed into the village while following a prey. A team of foresters led by Meshram immediately rushed to the spot on getting the information. DCF Sanjay Thawre and ACF Dhote and Waghade too visited the scene.

The forest officials immediately installed two cages in the area, anticipating that the leopard might return to take the kill, but the beast did not come. “Two cages have been installed and we are optimistic of capturing the leopard quickly. A squad of forest department staffers has also been posted in area to keep watch and thwart the beast if it tries to enter the village,” he said.

Forest officials paid an ex-gratia amount to Pranali’s family for funeral and 2 lakh compensation would be given after formalities are completed.

speakoutnagpur@timesgroup.com

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-10-16/nagpur/30285812_1_leopard-forest-officials-village-in-nagbhid-tehsil

Panamanian lions settle into new home at Wild Animal Sanctuary

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Panamanian lions settle into new home at Wild Animal Sanctuary

The new Panama lionesses at the Wild Animal Sanctuary, from top to bottom, Kaitlin, Elena and Alyssa, enjoy their new home outside Denver. Prior to their rescue, the lions were kept in a 5-foot by 8-foot cage with concrete floors. Now they enjoy a large, comfortable space with proper bedding and toys.
NANTENA BELLER / For the Tribune
Kaitlin still spends some time every day pacing in the corner, despite all the space around her.

It all must feel so foreign, even two weeks after she and her two pride sisters arrived on Sept. 28. The extra meat, the soft sod beneath her paws and that space provided by the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg represent everything they didn’t have in their lives on some fairgrounds outside of Panama City.

Their world for their 14 years prior was a concrete floor, a 40-square-foot cage and scraps of food.

They’ll adjust. Just look at the 25 lions the sanctuary brought to its 720 acres in its last international rescue in mid-February. They were circus animals from Bolivia, and they lived in the same small cages, off tiny diets and on stone-cold floors.

“Now they have bellies on them,” said Katie Vandegrift, spokeswoman for the sanctuary. “Their coats are better, and they don’t seem to have any worries in the world. Now they just get to enjoy being lions.”

That’s the goal for the three sisters, too, but it will take some work, just as it did for the 25 Bolivians. The girls don’t eat as well as their new caretakers would like, but that’s because back on those fairgrounds outside of Panama City, they had to make their meat last, as they weren’t sure when more was coming. They need some vet and dental work. They need a pride. The sanctuary hopes to put them with Kimba.

Kimba is a bit older and a little cranky, so much so that sanctuary workers call him the grandpa. But it may be a good fit: The females are essentially middle-aged, just a year or two younger than him (lions usually live 23 years or so in captivity), and they were mesmerized with Kimba’s call when he started roaring at them as soon as they walked in their new home. Just in case the match goes REALLY well, the three will be fitted with implants, so they can “date but not mate,” as Vandegrift said.

They named two of them Alyssa and Kaitlin after the FedEx planes that brought them to Denver, and they named the third Elena after Elena Castejon, a woman in Panama who worked to free the lions. She was one of dozens of people and organizations who have helped the sanctuary in recent months bring the 25 circus lions and now the trio to Keenesburg.

After Kimba’s introduction and when they get healthier and heavier, the sanctuary will open the gates to a 20-acre habitat probably little different from Africa, save for the winters here. The sanctuary will also give the public a chance to see all of the lions by the end of the year, when a mile-long walkway will lead visitors to the lion’s habitat cages that facility workers built in two months to prepare for the 25 circus cats.

“We know the three have a long way to go,” Vandegrift said.

New lionesses from Panama, Elena and Kaitlin, react to the roars of other lions in the Bolivian lion house. The lion house was built earlier this year to house the 23 lions rescued from Bolivia.
NANTENA BELLER / For the Tribune

But they look forward to the day when they can open the doors to the wide-open prairie, and the three females will have a place to roam rather than pace.

See the lions
The Wild Animal Sanctuary is located at 1946 CR 53 in Keenesburg. Go to www.wildanimalsanctuary.org. The sanctuary is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Kids under 3 are admitted free.

 

Yearly tiger census in Sunderbans on the cards

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Yearly tiger census in Sunderbans on the cards

 

KOLKATA: Population dynamics of Sunderbans tigers may get to see a new light, with the Centre deciding to add another phase of study for a reliable and detailed assessment of number of big cats in the mangroves.

 

Sunderbans Tiger Reserve field director Subrat Mukherji, who attended a meeting with National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) andWildlife Institute of India (WII) officials in New Delhi on Thursday, said more sample sites would be included in the new phase. “Last time camera traps had been laid only across 100 sq km area near Netidhopani. In the new upgraded format, which will be an upgradation of phase III in last census, we have suggested three sample sites covering upper, middle and lower areas of Sunderbans.”

 

While cameras will be placed in Sajnekhali and Netidhopani in upper areas, in middle areas, Chamta and Katoajhuri will be ideal for camera traps. In lower areas, cameras can be set up at Kendo, Haldi and Baghmara, said Mukherji, adding that Centre will release approximately Rs 30-40 lakh for the exercise.

 

Meanwhile, WIIas YV Jhala said the Phase IV of tiger conservation will also be done in Sunderbans for a better conservation of the big cats. The introduction of this four-phase census implies that the big cats will be counted every year during a four-year period.

 

According to NTCA deputy inspector general (DIG) S P Yadav, the Phase IV census will begin this November and will continue till February in all tiger reserves including Sunderbans. “The state governments will conduct the exercise with technical and financial support from the Centre. This will be tiger reserve specific census while the one conducted in a gap of four years is landscape-specific census,” Yadav said.

 

The new protocol will use 25 pairs of double-sided cameras per 100 square kilometres, and a minimum trapping effort of 1000 trap nights per 100 square kilometres. This, according to a WII official, will give a yearly indication of the status of critical tiger populations, and will be helpful in long-term management and conservation of tiger populations. Distance sampling protocols may be used for prey population estimation.

 

It may be noted that during the latest census, 102 photos were taken in Sunderbans using camera traps recording presence of 12 different tigers a” 10 adult and two cubs.

 

Meanwhile, Mukherji said other issues discussed with NTCA members included technology transfer with Bangladesh and funding pattern. “We will visit Bangladesh soon to share the technology, to be used in phase IV of the census.”

 

The latest tiger census report said Indian Sunderbans has about 70 tigers, with the lower limit at 64 and upper at 90. “Since it was not possible to walk in the mangrove forests to record tiger sign encounter rates due to lack of proper animal trails and fear of tiger attacks, we used tidal channel searches. One hundred and twenty six boat transects were sampled across the entire reserve,” said an NTCA member. Officials from Buxa Tiger Reserve too attended the meet.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata/Yearly-tiger-census-in-Sunderbans-on-the-cards/articleshow/10346808.cms