Don’t They Miss Being Petted?

Don’t They Miss Being Petted?

I hear that almost every time I explain that we are a NO CONTACT facility.

Wild animals shouldn’t be kept as pets.  Most of the cats at Big Cat Rescue were once kept as pets who are usually discarded once they become adults and begin to spray and bite.  We do not allow contact between staff or volunteers or the public with the cats; even the small ones.  There are a lot of reasons:

Bobcat Little Feather

Bobcat Little Feather

1.  The cats are solitary by nature and do not seek our affection.

2.  It is dangerous to have any part of your body on the same side of the fence as the cat.

3.  It gives the false impression to those who see the photos or videos to think these cats might make good pets.

For many years we did not allow any kind of contact but as our population of cats has aged they are less able to groom themselves.  80% of our cats are over the age of 15 which is already several years older than these cats live in the wild or in most other facilities.  Some of our cats cannot groom off the winter coats in areas around their backs and necks so we are trying something new with a specially made back scratcher, available at Bed Bath & Beyond.

It looks like a car’s radio antennae and is extendable to keep the Senior Keeper’s hands out of striking distance.  It has a little hand of rounded fingers to scratch loose the mats.  As you can see the cat really likes getting rid of the loose fur.

Why do other places pet big cats?

There is only one reason that people post pictures of themselves touching big cats.  It is to show off.

They make all kinds of excuses for their egotistic behavior and say stupid things like:

  1.  The cats get depressed if we don’t pet them.
  2. It helps them deal with captivity.
  3. It makes people understand that they should be protected.
  4. It fosters a desire to protect them in the wild.
  5. They have to encourage cub petting to raise the money to feed the adult cats.

Let’s expose these lies for what they are.

The cats get depressed if we don’t pet them.

Big Cat Rescue doesn’t allow petting and our cats live longer, happier, healthier lives than any where else on the planet.

No scientist has ever concluded such a ridiculous finding after doing any sort of real study.

If the cage is so small and barren that this is the case, then what the owner needs to do is give them more space, more places to enjoy, more enrichment and things the cat actually does want.

It helps them deal with captivity.

Why is it that the very people making such claims are the ones breeding or buying more cats for life in cages?

Nothing will make captivity an acceptable alternative for living free; least of all putting the person and the cat in danger.  Yes, the cat is in danger, because if the person gets bitten the authorities can insist that the head be cut off and tested for rabies, even if the person who was bitten doesn’t want them to and even if the cat is up to date on their rabies shots.

It makes people understand that they should be protected.

This is probably the most common lie.  The backyard breeders and exotic pet owners heard it from the zoos who have been using this lame excuse for their very existence.

In fact, studies have shown that when people are seen in close proximity to endangered species the reaction by the public is that they must not be endangered, or that wouldn’t be allowed.

The underlying message is that these animals can be tamed and treated like pets, so people buy them and pay to touch them and further the abuse, rather than treating them with respect.

It fosters a desire to protect them in the wild.

Wrong!  Seeing people petting big cats makes people want to pay to pet big cats or to own them.  THAT is what the people who are promoting the petting are trying to foster; not real conservation.

They have to encourage cub petting to raise the money to feed the adult cats.

It’s hard to believe that anyone falls for this excuse because it is just so lacking in common sense.  How crazy is it to keep breeding more big mouths to feed if you can’t feed the big mouths you already bred and exploited?  That is a situation that is doomed to end in disaster and anyone who participates in it, is equally responsible for the misery and suffering that will surely ensue.

 

Document Retention

Document Retention

DOCUMENT RETENTION AND DESTRUCTION POLICY

 

In accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which makes it a crime to alter, cover up, falsify, or destroy any document with the intent of impeding or obstructing any official proceeding, this policy provides for the systematic review, retention and destruction of documents received or created by Big Cat Rescue in connection with the transaction of organization business. This policy covers all records and documents, regardless of physical form, contains guidelines for how long certain documents should be kept and how records should be destroyed. The policy is designed to ensure compliance with federal and state laws and regulations, to eliminate accidental or innocent destruction of records and to facilitate the sanctuary’s operations by promoting efficiency and freeing up valuable storage space.

Documents shall be retained in accordance with the attached schedule. Documents that are not listed, but are substantially similar to those listed in the schedule will be retained for the appropriate length of time.

Electronic documents will be retained as if they were paper documents. Therefore, any electronic files, including records of donations made online, that fall into one of the document types on the above schedule will be maintained for the appropriate amount of time. If a user has sufficient reason to keep an email message, the message should be printed in hard copy and kept in the appropriate file or moved to an “archive” computer file folder. Backup and recovery methods will be tested on a regular basis.

Destruction of financial and personnel-related documents will be accomplished by shredding.  Document destruction will be suspended immediately, upon any indication of an official investigation or when a lawsuit is filed or appears imminent. Destruction will be reinstated upon conclusion of the investigation.

SCHEDULE OF RETENTION PERIODS 

Type of Document Minimum Requirement
Accounts payable ledgers and schedules 7 years
Animal records Permanently
Audit reports Permanently
Bank Reconciliations 2 years
Bank statements 3 years
Copies of checks (for important payments and purchases) Permanently
Contracts, mortgages, notes and leases (expired) 7 years
Contracts (still in effect) Permanently
Correspondence (general) 2 years
Correspondence (legal and important matters) Permanently
Correspondence (with customers and vendors) 2 years
Deeds, mortgages, and bills of sale of property owned Permanently
Deeds, mortgages, and bills of sale of property disposed of 7 years
Depreciation Schedules Permanently
Duplicate deposit slips 2 years
Employment applications and records of current employees Permanently
Employment applications and records of former employees 7 years
Employment applications of applicants not hired 3 years
Expense Analyses/expense distribution schedules 7 years
Year End Financial Statements Permanently
Insurance Policies (expired) 3 years
Insurance records, current accident reports, claims, policies, etc. Permanently
Intern and Volunteer records Permanently
Internal audit reports 3 years
Inventories of products, materials, and supplies 7 years
Invoices (to customers, from vendors) 7 years
Minute books, bylaws and charter Permanently
Patents and related papers Permanently
Payroll records and summaries 7 years
Personnel files (terminated employees) 7 years
Retirement and pension records Permanently
Tax returns and worksheets Permanently
Timesheets 7 years
Trademark registrations and copyrights Permanently
Withholding tax statements 7 years

 

 

 

Cat Care

Cat Care

Big Cat Care

 

Big Cat Care Book CoverBig Cat Rescue has evolved since its inception in 1992. By 1997 we had seen enough of the abuse and abandonment caused by the pet trade that we had previously engaged in to know that there was no reason to breed exotic animals for lives in cages. As a result we increased our efforts through spaying, neutering and cage building to ensure that we would no longer be a part of the problem. As we have continued to learn about the causes of so much suffering we have become active in stopping the exotic pet trade through education and legislation. More HERE.

 

The following is provided for those running a sanctuary who want to learn from our experience, or for those who have already made the mistake of supporting the pet trade so that the animal in your care does not suffer even more after being ripped from his mother. With more than 30 years experience, with every sort of exotic cat, I can assure you that there is nothing you can do to raise up an exotic cat to be a house pet.  It just isn’t possible.  No matter how young you neuter or spay the cats, both male and female, ALWAYS spray when they become adults.  The suggestions below are for those who are starting sanctuaries so that you don’t become another one of the 98% who kill their exotic animals in the first two years due to a lack of knowledge.

Buy the book, Big Cat Care – How to Start a Sanctuary by Carole Baskin in iTunes and on Amazon

 

How to Rescue a Big Cat

Bathing

Bobcat BabyCaging

Claws

Emergency

Burns

CPR

Dehydration

Frostbite

Heatstroke

Poisons

Plants

Snakes

Restraining and Restraint Part 2

Shock

Wounds

Kittens and Cubs

Bobcat KittenBacteria

Feeding Cubs

Formulas

Tube Feeding

Housing

Manners

Litterbox

Parasites and Fleas

Pills

Rehabilitating

Vaccinations

 

Standard Operating Procedures

 

Acquisitions

Dispositions

Collection

Hazard Communication Program

Master Plan

MSDS

Sanctuary Standards

Exotic Cat Standards

 

Keeper Training

 

Accidents

Animal Contact

Animal Health

Basic Husbandry

Cat-A-Tats or Big Cat Cages

Conservation

Emergencies

Enrichment

Escapes

Feed Cats

Hurricane Preparedness

Hygiene and Pests

Siberian Lynx HowlsJob Requirements

Quarantine

Records

Restraint

Rules & Safety

Toxins

Volunteer Management

 

Governance Policies

 

Anti Harassment

Board Governance

Bylaws and Articles

CEO Performance

Lion RoaringCEO Reports to Board

Code of Honor

Conflict of Interest

Disaster Plan

Document Retention & Destruction

IRS Determination Letter

Master Plan

Non Discrimination

Principles_Reference

Whistleblower Protection

 

Sanctuary Standards

Sanctuary Standards

Sanctuary Standards

bobcats grooming by Beth Stewart

Bobcats Grooming by Beth Stewart

Right Click HERE and then select “Save Target As” for an Excel Chart with a complete chart of Sanctuary Standards.

For Exotic Cat Care Standards go HERE.

To read the Federal Trade Commission’s charity checklist, click HERE.

How can you tell a real sanctuary from a fake?

It’s actually easier than telling a diamond from a cubic zirconium because if you look at them, under any light at all, they are easy to tell apart. The problem is that the fake ones insist on keeping you in the dark. Some legitimate sanctuaries believe that their animals should never have to see humans, other than for their daily feeding and cleaning, and are closed to the public. Pseudo sanctuaries use this same tactic to keep the public from seeing the deplorable conditions that their animals are kept in.

Fake sanctuaries often have wonderful web sites full of self serving documentation about all the wonderful ways your donations save lives. They rely heavily on direct mail campaigns and paid solicitors. New laws have enabled these mail houses to front the costs and then pay themselves, exorbitantly, from the proceeds making it that much easier for pseudo sanctuaries to solicit funds. This means that even less of your donation is actually going to the cause (assuming any of it was before).

There are a few fool proof ways to know if the sanctuary you support is a real sanctuary or a fake:

  • Real sanctuaries don’t breed or buy animals. If there are babies, they were probably bought or born there. People don’t get rid of them until they are too big to handle. If there is a baby, ask how it got there and ask for proof.
  • Real sanctuaries don’t exploit animals. They don’t take dangerous animals out in public on leashes or in cages. Many pseudo sanctuaries do and they say they are educating the public that these animals don’t make good pets, but when people see that they can be walked on leashes or taken out in public to be shown off or to make money, then they will want to buy one of their own. It is the equivalent of saying to your audience, “Do as I say, and not as I do.”
  • Real sanctuaries adhere to the law. They will be licensed by the state, and usually by the USDA. They will be classified by the IRS as a non profit 501 c 3 charity. They will be licensed by the state to solicit donations, and every piece of solicitation that you see, from print to web site, will have documentation of the fact that they are so licensed. Some states, such as Florida, go a step further and require that the percentage that goes to the program services of the cause be included in all solicitation materials. Big Cat Rescue spends 100% of its donations on program services (ie: taking care of the cats).
  • Real sanctuaries meet the highest sanctuary standards. Fake sanctuaries will say that they don’t like the politics, or it’s a waste of donor’s money, or that they don’t want someone else telling them how to take care of their animals, but none of those are valid reasons for not meeting the highest sanctuary standards. Many fake sanctuaries are licensed by their state and by USDA and will tell you that these governing bodies are the watchdogs of the industry, but neither USDA nor any state law defines a sanctuary as being a place where animals are not bred, sold or exploited. USDA’s standards only require that an animal’s cage be big enough that he can stand up and turn around in it.

The Global Federation of Sanctuaries only accredits real sanctuaries. It only costs $150.00 per year to be a member and the application is only four pages long, so it is not a huge investment of time and money. Accreditation is only granted after an on-site inspection if the facility meets the high standards of care and responsibility. The facility must continue to maintain those standards and be re-inspected regularly to insure compliance. Membership provides real sanctuaries with a method of demonstrating their excellence to the public and donors. Membership also enables small sanctuaries across the nation to unite as one voice for the animals because The Global Federation of Sanctuaries is a member for the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition which is made up of 20 huge organizations including the Humane Society of the United States, The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, The Animal Protection Institute, Peta and many more.

  • Real sanctuaries spend your donated dollars on program services. This means they spend the money on the things that made you select them as your charity. GuideStar.com lists all non profit organizations and posts their tax returns so that you can see how the money is being spent. If you type in the key word “animal” almost 15,000 organizations are listed, but only 23 of them are accredited by The Global Federation of Sanctuaries. The industry standard allows that charities spend up to 35% of their donations on soliciting and still be considered reputable. A search of the 990s on GuideStar will show that fake sanctuaries often spend as much as 75% of their donations on raising more money. In almost all of these cases you will see that the biggest expense in the pseudo sanctuary is in providing a salary to the founder. Big Cat Rescue’s founder donated millions of dollars to start the sanctuary and refused compensation for the first 20 years of the rescue’s growth.

As in every aspect of life, the truth is out there. With the right tools you can discover it for yourself.

 

 

FTC Charity Checklist

Thinking about donating to a charity? The Federal Trade Commission advises that you consider the following precautions to ensure that your donation dollars benefit the people and organizations you want to help. They’re good practices whether you’re contacted by an organization’s employees, volunteers or professional fund-raisers, soliciting donations by phone, mail or in person.

  • Be wary of appeals that tug at your heart strings, especially pleas involving patriotism and current events.
  • Ask for the name of the charity if the telemarketer does not provide it promptly.
  • Ask what percentage of the donation is used to support the causes described in the
    solicitation, and what percentage is used for administrative costs.
  • Call the charity to find out if it’s aware of the solicitation and has authorized the
    use of its name.
  • If the telemarketer claims that the charity will support local organizations, call the local groups to verify.
  • Discuss the donation with a trusted family member or friend before committing the funds.
  • Don’t provide any credit card or bank account information until you have reviewed all
    information from the charity and made the decision to donate.
  • Ask for a receipt showing the amount of the contribution and stating that it is tax
    deductible.
  • Understand that contributions made to a “tax exempt” organization are not necessarily tax deductible.
  • Avoid cash gifts. They can be lost or stolen. For security and tax record purposes, it’s best to pay by check – made payable to the beneficiary, not the solicitor.

The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on wise giving, visit www.ftc.gov/charityfraud or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261.

Rules

Rules

WORKPLACE SAFETY PROGRAM

Table of Contents

Section I – Management Commitment and Involvement 1
Section II – Safety and Health Training 2
Section III – Safety Meetings 3
Section IV – Safety Committee 4
Section V – Safety Inspections 5
Section VI – First Aid Procedures 6
Section VII – Accident Investigations 7
Section VIII – Workplace Safety RulesSection IX – On Property Safety 814

 

Be Safe Out There!

Be Safe Out There!

ATTACHMENTS

 

Tour Guide Procedures Class

Gate Operation, Tour Back Up & Guest Relations Class

Animal Emergency Procedures Class

Human First Aid Procedures Class

 

Section I.

 

Management Commitment and Involvement Policy Statement

The management of Big Cat Rescue is committed to providing employees with a safe and healthful workplace. It is the policy of this organization that employees report unsafe conditions and do not perform work tasks if the work is considered unsafe. Employees must report all accidents, injuries, and unsafe conditions to their supervisors. No such report will result in retaliation, penalty, or other disincentive.

Employee recommendations to improve safety and health conditions will be given thorough consideration by the management team. Management will give top priority to and provide the financial resources for the correction of unsafe conditions. Violation of workplace safety rules may result in disciplinary action. This action may include verbal or written reprimands and may result in termination of employment.

The primary responsibility for the coordination, implementation, and maintenance of our Workplace Safety Program has been assigned to the following individual who, in addition to any other title held, will be our Safety Program Coordinator:

Name: Gale Ingham

Title: Operations Manager

Telephone: 813.850.7052

Because we work with dangerous animals, safety is of absolutely paramount concern. But we must not let our focus on the animals allow us to fail to be aware of the safety issues that arise in any workplace, such as use of tools, equipment, ladders and safety issues inherent in the office environment. This manual is intended to cover these as well as some of the animal care safety issues that are covered in detail in our training programs.

This policy statement serves to express management’s commitment to and involvement in providing our employees a safe and healthful workplace. This Workplace Safety Program will be incorporated as the standard of practice for this organization. Compliance with the safety rules will be required of all employees as a condition of employment.

If at any time you feel that a safety issue you have raised to anyone other than myself has not been promptly or properly addressed, I want you to know that it is part of our policy and the commitment you make in signing this document that you will bring it directly to my attention.

Carole Baskin, Founder and CEO

I have received a copy of this Workplace Safety Program and in signing below I acknowledge that I:

  • have read it completely
  • have understood the contents or have had an opportunity to ask questions and if I have asked questions I have received answers that I understood
  • understand that compliance with these rules and others that I may be informed about from time to time is a condition of employment, and
  • agree to abide by the safety rules of Big Cat Rescue. 

 

___________________________________

Employee Signature

___________________________________

Print Name Legibly

 

Section II.

 

Safety and Health Training

 

Safety and Health Orientation

 

Workplace safety and health orientation begins on the first day of initial employment or job transfer. Each employee will be given a personal copy of this Workplace Safety Program containing our workplace safety rules, policies and procedures. Supervisors will answer the employee’s questions to ensure knowledge and understanding of safety rules, policies, and job-specific procedures described in this manual.

Supervisors will instruct all employees that compliance with the safety rules described in the workplace safety manual is required.

 

Job Specific Training

 

  • Supervisors will initially train employees on how to perform assigned job tasks safely.
  • Supervisors will carefully review with each employee the specific safety rules, policies, and procedures that are applicable and that are described in the workplace safety manual.
  • Supervisors will give employees verbal instructions and specific directions on how to do the work safely.
  • Supervisors will observe employees performing the work. If necessary, the supervisor will provide a demonstration using safe work practices, or remedial instruction to correct training deficiencies before an employee is permitted to do the work without supervision.
  • All employees will receive safe operating instructions on seldom-used or new equipment before using the equipment.
  • Supervisors will review safe work practices with employees before permitting the performance of new, non-routine, or specialized procedures.

 

Periodic Retraining of Employees

 

All employees will be retrained when changes are made to the workplace safety manual.

Individual employees will be retrained after the occurrence of a work related injury caused by an unsafe act or work practice, and when a supervisor observes an employee displaying unsafe acts, practices, or behaviors.

 

Section III.

 

Safety Meetings

 

The Safety Coordinator will conduct a monthly safety meeting with the employees covering one or more topics. In addition to the safety topic, supervisors may discuss other items such as recent accidents and injuries, results of safety inspections, and revisions of safety policies and procedures. Safety Meetings may be part of the monthly Volunteer Meeting so Volunteers obtain the benefit of them as well.

The Safety Coordinator will follow the below plan of action to ensure successful safety meetings are conducted.

  1. Preparing for the Meeting
  • The Safety Coordinator in the course of his duties as Operations Manager will observe and inspect the various areas and work practices and note any unsafe acts being performed or unsafe conditions that need to be corrected.
  • If any unsafe acts or conditions are discovered during the inspections, the Safety Coordinator will select an unsafe act or condition to be used as a Safety Meeting topic for the benefit of all. A Safety Meeting can help identify and eliminate hazards before accidents occur.

 

  1. Conduct the Meeting
  • The Safety Coordinator will discuss one topic per meeting unless he feels there are more than one that require attention.
  • Allow employees to discuss why the situation occurs if it has occurred.
  • Reach an agreement with employees on how to eliminate or control the situation if it has occurred.

 

  1. Keep a Record of the Meeting
  • Documentation will be maintained of each employee safety meeting. It should contain the subject(s) discussed as well as an attendance sheet. 

 

Section IV.

 

Safety Committee

 

Safety Committee Organization

 

A Safety Committee has been established as a management tool to recommend improvements to our Workplace Safety Program and to identify corrective measures needed to eliminate or control recognized safety and health hazards. The Safety Committee shall be composed of all of the members of the Volunteer Committee.

 

Responsibilities

 

The Safety Committee will be responsible for:

  • Assisting management in communicating procedures for evaluating the effectiveness of control measures used to protect employees from safety and health hazards in the workplace.
  • Assisting management in reviewing and updating workplace safety rules based on accident investigation findings, any inspection findings, and employee reports of unsafe conditions or work practices; and accepting and addressing anonymous complaints and suggestions from employees.
  • Assisting management in updating the Workplace Safety Program by evaluating employee injury and accident records, identifying trends and patterns, and formulating corrective measures to prevent recurrence.
  • Assisting management in evaluating employee accident and illness prevention programs, and promoting safety and health awareness and co-worker participation through continuous improvements to the Workplace Safety Program.
  • Participating in safety training and for assisting management in monitoring workplace safety education and training to ensure that it is in place, that it is effective, and that it is documented.

 

 

Meetings

 

Safety issues will be addressed at the meetings of the Volunteer Committee and the discussions reflected in the notes of the meeting. If any employee has raised a safety concern to be addressed by the committee, the employee shall be given a response in writing. If the discussion results in any change in rules or procedures, the Workplace Safety Program shall be revised to reflect these changes and all employees given copies of the revised pages to place in their personal copies of the program.

 

Section V.

 

Safety Inspections and Preventative Maintenance

 

Inspections provide an opportunity to survey the work place to detect potential hazards and correct them before an accident occurs. Typically, inspections are made to identify physical hazards at the work site, however, the work practices of employees will also be observed during the inspections. Supervisors and the Safety Coordinator will observe employees to determine if they are performing their jobs in accordance with safe job procedures. They will also inspect equipment and tools regularly to determine if maintenance is required to keep them in safe operating condition, and arrange for such maintenance if it is determined to be necessary.

 

Continuous Monitoring

 

Safety is the responsibility of each and every employee. Continuous, informal inspections should be conducted by employees, supervisors, and maintenance personnel as part of their regular job responsibilities. These are the personnel who are most familiar with work site operations and machinery. Our employees are a valuable source of information on work place hazards and we look to them for assistance in formulating practical workplace controls.

Supervisors must continually monitor their work areas. On a daily basis they will check that:

  • Employees are following safe work procedures
  • Machinery and tools are in good condition
  • Machine guards are in position
  • Material is stored properly
  • Aisles, walkways, and exit passageways are clear and accessible

 

Section VI.

 

First Aid Procedures

Emergency Phone Numbers

 

Safety Coordinator: 813.850.7052

Founder: 813-493-4564

Ambulance: 911

Walk In Clinic: Fast Track Walk-In Clinic

Phone: 813-925-1903

Address: 11969 Sheldon Rd., Tampa, FL  33626

South of Citrus Park Drive on Westwind

Hospital Emergency Room: Town & Country Hospital

Phone: 813-882-7130

Address: 6001 Webb Road, Tampa, FL 33615

Poison Control: 1-800-222-1222

Fire Department: 911

Police: 911

 

Please Note:

In all cases requiring emergency medical treatment, immediately call, or have a co-worker call, to request medical assistance.

 

Minor First Aid Treatment

If you sustain an injury or are involved in an accident requiring minor first aid treatment:

  • Inform your supervisor.
  • Administer first aid treatment to the injury or wound.
  • If a first aid kit is used, indicate usage on the accident investigation report.
  • Access to a first aid kit is not intended to be a substitute for medical attention.
  • Provide details for the completion of the accident investigation report.

 

Non-Emergency Medical Treatment

For non-emergency work-related injuries requiring professional medical assistance.

  • Inform your supervisor.
  • Proceed to the posted medical facility. Your supervisor will assist with transportation, if necessary.
  • Provide details for the completion of the accident investigation report.
  • Management will report the injury to the insurance company within 24 hours. Travelers 800-832-7839.

 

Emergency Medical Treatment

If you sustain a severe injury requiring emergency treatment:

  • Call for help and seek assistance from a co-worker.
  • Request assistance and transportation to the local hospital emergency room or call 911 for an ambulance as appropriate.
  • Provide details for the completion of the accident investigation report.
  • Management will report the injury to the insurance within 24 hours. Travelers 800-832-7839.

 

First Aid Training

Each employee will read the Human First Aid Procedures Class attached to this Safety Program and take the class as soon as possible.

 

Section VII.

 

Accident Investigation

 

Accident Investigation Procedures

 

The supervisor at the location where the accident occurred will perform an accident investigation. The safety coordinator is responsible for seeing that the accident investigation reports are being filled out completely and that the recommendations generated as a result of the investigation are being addressed. Supervisors will investigate all accidents resulting in an employee injury using the following investigation procedures.

  • Review the equipment, operations, and processes to gain an understanding of the accident situation.
  • Identify and interview each witness and any other person who might provide clues to the accident’s causes.
  • Investigate causal conditions and unsafe acts; make conclusions based on existing facts.
  • Complete the accident investigation report.
  • Provide recommendations for corrective actions.
  • Implement temporary control measures to prevent any further injuries to employees.
  • Indicate the need for additional or remedial safety training. 

Accident investigation reports must be completed and submitted to the safety coordinator within 24 hours of the accident.

 

Accident Record Keeping Procedures

 

The safety coordinator will control and maintain all employee accident and injury records. Records are maintained for a minimum of three (3) years and include:

  • Accident Investigation Reports.
  • Worker’s Compensation First Report of Injury or Illness form. 

 

Section VIII.

 

Workplace Safety Rules

 

The safety rules contained on these pages have been prepared to protect you in your daily work. Employees are to follow these rules, review them often and use good common sense in carrying out assigned duties.

 

General Employee Work Rules

 

 

Housekeeping

  • Do not place trash in walkways and passageways.
  • Do not kick objects out of your pathway; pick them up or push them aside and out of the way.
  • Do not throw matches, cigarettes or other smoking materials into trash bins.
  • Do not store or leave items on stairways.
  • Do not block or obstruct stairwells, exits or accesses to safety and emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers or fire alarms.

 

Ladder and Step Ladder Safety

  • Do not use ladders that have loose rungs, cracked or split side rails, missing rubber foot pads or are otherwise visibly damaged.
  • Keep ladder rungs clean of grease. Remove build up of material such as plaster, dirt or mud.
  • Secure the ladder in place firmly; have another employee hold it when possible.
  • Face the ladder when climbing up or down.

 

Performing Work from a Ladder

  • One person shall be on the ladder at a time.
  • Face the ladder and do not lean backwards or sideways from the ladder.
  • Do not stand on the top two rungs of any ladder.
  • Do not use a ladder that wobbles or that leans to the left or right.
  • Do not try to ‘walk’ a ladder by rocking it. Climb down the ladder and then move it.

 

Office Personnel

 

Office Safety

  • Store sharp objects such as pens, pencils, letter openers, or scissors in drawers or with the points down in a container.
  • Carry pencils, scissors and other sharp objects with the points down.
  • Do not jump from ramps, platforms, ladders, or step stools.
  • Do not run on stairs or take more than one step at a time.
  • Use the handrails when ascending or descending stairs or ramps.
  • Obey all posted safety and danger signs.

 

Furniture Use

  • Open one file cabinet drawer at a time.
  • Close drawers and doors immediately after use.
  • Use the handle when closing doors, drawers, and files.
  • Put heavy files in the bottom drawers of file cabinets.
  • Do not tilt the chair you are sitting in on its two back legs.
  • Do not stand on furniture to reach high places. Use a ladder or step stool to retrieve or store items that are located above your head.

 

Handling Supplies

  • Do not block your view by carrying large bulky items; use a dolly or hand truck or get assistance from a fellow employee.
  • Cut in the direction away from your body when using knives or cutters.

 

Equipment Use

  • Use a staple remover, not your fingers, for removing staples.
  • Turn off and unplug machines before adjusting, lubricating, or cleaning them.
  • Do not use fans that have excessive vibration, frayed cords, or missing guards.
  • Turn the power switch of the equipment to ‘off’ when it is not being used.

 

General Labor Personnel

 

Housekeeping

  • Do not leave loose tools or other items on a ledge or lying around the floor. Return tools to their storage places after use.
  • Keep walking surfaces of elevated working platforms, such as scaffolds and equipment, clear of tools and materials that are being used.
  • Do not use gasoline for cleaning purposes.
  • Sweep up scraps and debris from wallboard installation such as screws, mesh and tape by using a broom and dust pan.

 

Lifting Safety

  • Plan the move before lifting; remove obstructions from your chosen pathway.
  • Test the weight of the load before lifting by pushing the load along its resting surface.
  • If the load is too heavy or bulky, use lifting and carrying aids such as hand trucks, dollies, pallet jacks and carts or get assistance from a co-worker.
  • If assistance is required to perform a lift, coordinate and communicate your movements with those of your co-worker.
  • Never lift anything if your hands are greasy or wet.
  • Wear protective gloves approved by your supervisor when lifting objects with sharp corners or jagged edges.
  • Do not lift an object from the floor to a level above your waist in one motion. Set the load down on a table or bench and then adjust your grip before lifting it higher.

 

Job Site Safety

  • Do not walk under partially demolished walls or floors.
  • Stop working outdoors and seek shelter during lightning storms.
  • Do not begin working until barricades, warning signs or other protective devices have been installed to isolate the work area.
  • Do not throw away or toss debris outside barricaded areas.
  • Stay clear of all trucks, forklifts, cranes, and other heavy equipment when in operation.
  • Do not approach any heavy equipment until the operator has seen you and has signaled to you that it is safe to approach.
  • Keep shirts on to avoid dehydration and sunburn.

 

Electrical Safety

  • Assume all electrical wires as live wires.
  • Do not wear watches, rings, or other metallic objects which could act as conductors of electricity around electrical circuits.
  • Wear the dielectric gloves when working on electric current.

 

Electrical Powered Tools

  • Do not use power equipment or tools on which you have not been trained.
  • Do not carry plugged in equipment or tools with your finger on the switch.
  • Do not leave tools that are ‘on’ unattended.
  • Do not handle or operate electrical tools when your hands are wet or when you are standing on wet floors.
  • Do not operate a power hand tool or portable appliance:
  • That has frayed, worn, cut, improperly spliced, or damaged cord.
  • That has two-pronged adapter or a two-conductor extension cord.
  • If a prong from the three pronged power plug is missing or has been removed.
  • Disconnect the tool from the outlet by pulling on the plug, not the cord.
  • Turn the tool off before plugging or unplugging it.
  • Turn off the electrical tool and unplug it from the outlet before attempting repairs or service work. Tag the tool “Out of Service.”
  • Do not stand in water or on wet surfaces when operating power hand tools or portable electrical appliances.
  • Never operate electrical equipment barefooted. Wear rubber soled or insulated work boots.
  • Do not operate a power hand tool or portable appliance while holding a part of the metal casing or while holding the extension cord in your hand.
  • Hold all portable power tools by the plastic handgrips or other nonconductive areas designed for gripping purposes.
  • Do not use electrical tools if its housing is cracked.
  • Do not use electrical tools while working on a metal ladder unless the ladder has rubber feet.

 

Electrical Cords

  • Keep power cords away from the path of drills and wire soldering and cutting equipment.
  • Do not use cords that have splices, exposed wires or cracked or frayed ends.
  • Do not remove the ground prong from electrical cords.
  • Do not use any adapter such as a cheater plug that eliminates the ground.
  • Do not plug multiple electrical cords into a single outlet.

 

Power Saws

  • Wear safety goggles, protective gloves, a dust mask, and hearing protection when operating a power saw.
  • Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry.
  • Clean any residue from the blade or cutting head before making a new cut with the power saw.
  • Do not use a power saw that has cracked, broken, or loose guards or other visible damage.
  • Keep your hands away from the exposed blade.
  • Operate the saw at full cutting speed, with a sharp blade, to prevent kickbacks.
  • Do not alter the anti kickback device or blade guard.
  • Do not perform cutting operations with the power saw while standing on a wet or slippery floor.
  • When using the power saw, do not reach across the cutting operation.
  • Cut away from your body and below shoulder level when you are using a power saw.
  • If the saw becomes jammed, turn the power switch off before pulling out the incomplete cut.

 

Pneumatic Tools

  • Do not point a compressed air hose at bystanders or use it to clean your clothing.
  • Do not use tools that have handles with burrs or cracks.
  • Do not use compressors if their belt guards are missing. Replace belt guards before use.
  • Turn the tool off and allow it to come to a complete stop before leaving it unattended.
  • Disconnect the tool from the air line before making any adjustments or repairs to the tool.
  • Engage positive locks on hoses and attachments before use.
  • Shut off pressure valve and disconnect air line when not in use.
  • Tag damaged of defective pneumatic tools “Out of Service” to prevent usage of the tool by other employees.

 

Hand Tool Safety

  • Use tied off containers to keep tools from falling off of elevated work platforms.
  • Do not use a tool if its handle has splinters, burrs, cracks, splits or if the head of the tools is loose.
  • Do not use tools while your hands are oily, greasy or wet.
  • When handing a tool to another person, direct sharp points and cutting edges away from yourself and the other person.
  • Do not carry sharp pointed hand tools such as screwdrivers in your pocket unless the tool or your pocket is sheathed.
  • Do not perform ‘makeshift’ repairs to tools.
  • Do not throw tools from one location to another, from one employee to another, from scaffolds or other elevated platforms.
  • Do not carry tools in your hand when climbing. Carry tools in tool belts or hoist the tools to the work area with a hand line.
  • Transport hand tools only in toolboxes or tool belts. Do not carry tools in your clothing.
  • When you are performing electrical work, use the tools with the blue rubber sleeves covering the handle, these are insulated.

 

Saws

  • Keep control of saws by releasing downward pressure at the end of the stroke.
  • Keep your hands and fingers away from the saw blade while you are using the saw.
  • When using a hand saw, hold your panel firmly against the worktable.
  • Do not use a saw that has dull saw blades.
  • Do not carry a saw by the blade.
  • Oil saw blades after each use of the saw.

 

Snips

  • Wear safety glasses or safety goggles when using snips to cut materials such as lath or corner beads.
  • Wear your work gloves when cutting materials with snips.
  • Do not use straight cut snips to cut curves.
  • Keep the blade aligned by tightening the nuts and bolts on the snips.
  • Do not use snips as a hammer, screwdriver, or pry bar.
  • Engage the locking clip on the snips after use.

 

Toolboxes/ Chest/ Cabinet

  • Tape over or file off sharp edges on toolboxes, chests, or cabinets.
  • Do not stand on toolbox, chest, or cabinet to gain extra height.
  • Lock the wheels on large toolboxes, chest, and cabinets to prevent from rolling.
  • Push large toolboxes, chest and cabinets; do not pull.
  • Do not open more than 1 drawer of a toolbox at a time.
  • Close and lock all drawers and doors before moving the toolbox to a new location.
  • Do not use toolbox or chest as a workbench.
  • Do not move a toolbox, chest or cabinet if it has loose parts or parts on the top.

 

Knives/ Sharp Instruments

  • When handling knife blades and other cutting tools, direct sharp points and edges away from you.
  • Always cut in the direction away from your body when using knives.
  • Carry all sharp tools in a sheath or holster. Stores knives in knife blocks or in sheaths after using them.
  • Use the knife that has been sharpened; do not use knives that have dull blades.
  • Do not use knives as screwdrivers.
  • Do not pick up knives by their blades.
  • Carry knives with tips pointed towards the floor.

 

Forklift Safety Rules

  • Do not exceed the lift capacity of the forklift. Read the lift capacity plate on the forklift if you are unsure.
  • Follow the manufacturer guidelines concerning changes in the lift capacity before adding an attachment, such as wedges, to a forklift.
  • Lift the load an inch or two to test for stability: if the rear wheels are not in firm contact with the floor, take a lighter load or use a forklift with a higher lift capacity.
  • Do not raise or lower a load while you are en-route. Wait until you are in the loading area and have stopped before raising or lowering the load.
  • After picking up a load, adjust the forks so that the load is tilted slightly backward for added stability.
  • Drive with the load at a ground clearance height of 4-6 inches at the tips and 2 inches at the heels in order to clear most uneven surfaces and debris.
  • Drive at a walking pace and apply brakes slowly to stop when driving on slippery surfaces such as icy or wet floors.
  • Do not drive over objects in your pathway.
  • Steer wide when making turns.
  • Do not drive up to anyone standing or working in front of a fixed object such as a wall.
  • Do not drive along the edge of an unguarded elevated surface such as a loading dock or staging platform.
  • Obey all traffic rules and signs.
  • Sound horn when approaching blind corners, doorways, or aisles to alert other operators and pedestrians.
  • Do not exceed a safe working speed of five miles per hour. Slow down in congested areas.
  • Stay a minimum distance of three truck lengths from other operating mobile equipment.
  • Drive in reverse and use a signal person when your vision is blocked by the load.
  • Look in the direction that you are driving; proceed when you have a clear path.
  • Drive loaded forklifts forward up ramps.
  • Raise the forks an additional two inches to avoid hitting or scraping the ramp surface as you approach the ramp.
  • Drive loaded forklifts in reverse when driving down a ramp.
  • Drive unloaded forklifts in reverse going up a ramp and forward going down a ramp.
  • Do not attempt to turn around on a ramp.
  • Do not use ‘reverse’ to brake.
  • Lower the mast completely, turn off the engine and set the parking brake before leaving your forklift.

 

Loading Docks

  • Keep the forklift clear of the dock edge while vehicles are backing up to the dock.
  • Do not begin loading or unloading until the supply truck has come to a complete stop, the engine has been turned off, the dock lock has been engaged and the wheels have been locked.
  • Attach the bridge or dock plate before driving the forklift into the truck.
  • Do not drive the forklift into a truck bed that has soft or loose decking or other unstable flooring.
  • Drive straight across the bridge plates when entering or exiting the trailer.
  • Use dock lights or headlights when working in a dark trailer.

 

Warehouse Safety

 

General

  • When manually stocking shelves, position the materials to be shelved slightly in front of you so you do not have to twist when lifting and stacking materials.
  • Visually inspect for sharp objects or other hazards before putting hands, legs or other body parts into containers such as garbage cans, boxes, bags, or sinks.
  • Remove or bend nails and staples from crates before unpacking.
  • When cutting shrink-wrap with a blade, always cut away from you and your co-workers.
  • Do not try to kick objects out of pathways. Push or carry them out of the way.
  • Do not let items overhang from shelves into walkways.
  • Move slowly when approaching blind corners.
  • Remove one object at a time from shelves.
  • Place items on shelves so that they lie flat and do not lean against each other.

 

Hand Truck Operations

  • Tip the load slightly forward so that the tongue of the hand truck goes under the load.
  • Push the tongue of the hand truck all the way under the load to be moved.
  • Keep the center of gravity of the load as low as possible by placing heavier objects below the lighter objects.
  • When loading hand trucks, keep your feet clear of the wheels.
  • Push the load so that the weight will be carried by the axle and not the handles.
  • Place the load so that it will not slip, shift or fall. Use straps, if provided, to secure the load.
  • If your view is obstructed, use a spotter to assist in guiding the load.
  • For extremely bulky or pressurized items such as gas cylinders, strap or chain the items to the hand truck.
  • Do not walk backward with the hand truck, unless going up stairs or ramps.
  • When going down an incline, keep the hand truck in front of you so that it can be controlled at all times.
  • Move hand trucks at a walking pace.
  • Store hand trucks with the tongue under a pallet, shelf, or table.
  • Do not exceed the manufacturer’s load rated capacity. Read the capacity plate on the hand truck if you are unsure.

 

Pallet Jack Use

  • Only employer authorized personnel may operate pallet jacks.
  • Do not exceed the manufacturer’s load rated capacity. Read the lift capacity plate on the pallet jack if you are unsure.
  • Do not ride on pallet jacks.
  • Start and stop gradually to prevent the load from slipping.
  • Pull manual pallet jacks; push when going down an incline or passing close to walls or obstacles.
  • If your view is obstructed, use a spotter to assist in guiding the load.
  • Stop the pallet jack if anyone gets in your way.
  • Do not place your feet under the pallet jack when it is moving.
  • Keep your feet and other body parts clear of pallet before releasing the load.

 

Storeroom/ Stockroom

  • Use long handled snips when cutting strapping bands away from a shipping container.
  • Wear safety glasses when cutting strapping bands, uncrating materials and driving nails.
  • Stand to the side of the strapping band when cutting it.
  • Do not use pallets or skids that are cracked or split or have other visible damage.
  • Stack heavy or bulky storage containers on middle and lower shelves of the storage rack.
  • Do not lift slippery or wet objects; use a hand truck.
  • Follow the safe handling instructions listed on the label of the container or listed on the corresponding Material Safety Data Sheet when handling each chemical stored in the stockroom.
  • Do not smoke while handling chemicals labeled flammable.
  • Do not store chemicals labeled flammable near sources of ignition such as space heaters and sparking tools.
  • Do not handle or load any containers of chemicals if their containers are cracked or leaking.
  • Do not leave pallet jack unattended with the load suspended.
  • Obey all safety and danger signs posted in the workplace.

 

Carts

  • Do not exceed the rated load capacity noted on the manufacturer’s label on the cart.
  • Use a spotter to help guide carts around corners and through narrow aisles.
  • Do not stand on a cart or use it as a work platform.

 

Section IX.

 

On Property Safety

 

General:

  • At no time, under any circumstances, will any part of your person come into direct contact with any animal at Big Cat Rescue unless under direct instruction and supervision of at least two of the following: The Founder, the President, the Operations Manager or the Attending Veterinarian.
  • An approved radio must be carried on your person at all times while on the property. You are responsible for keeping the radio in good working order.
  • No running or horseplay on the property.
  • Smoking is permitted in designated “smoking areas” only.

  • Absolutely no alcohol or drugs are allowed on the property at any time. No person shall enter the premises for eight hours after having consumed any alcoholic beverage or narcotics. Any person believed to be impaired due to alcohol or drugs will be removed from the property.

 

Property Access:

  • Do not operate the front gate nor allow access to the property to anyone with out proper training. If you do not recognize someone on the property, as a volunteer or staff member, politely ask if you can help him or her. Explain that they must be escorted by a volunteer or staff member. Lead them to the guest sign in and alert a Coordinator, Staff or Committee Member.
  • No person shall enter the property without having completed a “Release & Hold Harmless Agreement”.
  • If you have been entrusted with the gate code or keys, do not share these with anyone.

  • Make sure the gate is completely shut behind you as you enter and exit the property.
  • Employee parking is located in between the Education Center and the cell tower.
  • Easy Street is a privately owned road (not by Big Cat Rescue) and the people that live on the road are not affiliated with Big Cat Rescue. It is very important that we respect these people and drive no faster than 10 mph as well as yield to outbound traffic.

Safety Classes:

  • Follow all rules in the Tour Guide Procedures Class and Gate Operation, Tour Back Up & Guest Relations Class attached to this Safety Program. Take these volunteer classes as soon as possible after employment.

  • If you also volunteer at Big Cat Rescue, it is your responsibility to take the appropriate volunteer classes related to activities you engage in as a Volunteer and follow the rules contained therein and any other rules provided to you verbally or in writing separately from those classes.

As of June 2013.  See Staff for potential changes since this time.

Cages

Cages

Big Cat Rescue Enclosures

 

Big Cat Rescue doesn’t believe big cats should be bred for life in cages, but for those who had the misfortune of being bred in captivity, we offer the best habitats (or cat-a-tats as we like to call them) in the world.  Our cat-a-tats are large (ranging from 1200 square feet to 2.5 acres) and full of natural foliage and man made platforms and dens that were built to satisfy a curious cat’s every desire.  Most of our enclosures are roofed and are built with curving walls that provide the structural strength so it can be hard, from a single vantage point, to see how large our enclosures really are.  All of our tigers have pools that are kept fresh via our spring fed lake.

Volunteer-Marie-Cleaning-Tigers-Across-Lake

19 of our enclosures front on Tiger Lake.  Intern housing at far left and 8 cages along the bank under the arrow.

Each enclosure consists of two or more sections that are connected by a guillotine door that is left open, unless we have to lock a cat out of an area to go in and clean.  Each section will have a lockout for feeding and water, a den, and a place where the cat can perch.  Each enclosure has a safety entrance that consists of a double door system and keyed padlocks on both the inner and outer doors.  All guillotine doors can be operated from outside.  Our newer cages have been built with double galvanized, 5 gauge, 4×4  panels that do not require painting.  Our earlier cages were built of galvanized, 6 gauge, 4×4  panels that do require painting every so often.  The paint we use is Rustoleum, which is a rust brown colored paint, so close examination shows the cages to be in excellent condition, despite the color.

This video shows you how the cats easily navigate their mazes of connected enclosures and tunnels.

 

This video shows how our open air enclosures are built.  All open air enclosures have roofed sections attached in case of high winds.

 

Big Cat Enclosures

Big Cats Like This Lion Do NOT Belong in Cages

Big Cats Don’t Belong in Cages

No big cat belongs in a cage, but until we have better laws to protect exotic cats from being bred for lives of captivity and deprivation, we need to give them as much space and privacy as possible.  In their wild their territories would measure in square miles, not square feet, so even at its best a cage is nothing more than a jail cell.

Since all exotic cats, no matter how early they are neutered or spayed, spray bucket loads of urine all day you will want to provide an outdoor cage. Because we have so many cats we have many varieties of cages depending on the cats’ needs. We will begin with our favorite cages and proceed down to our minimum cages. USDA only requires that the animal be able to stand up and turn around in the pen and that it be clean. Some states have minimum size standards but they, like the USDA’s standards, are nothing short of cruel and inhumane. In Florida, a 600 pound, twelve foot long Siberian Tiger may be kept in a 10 foot by twenty four foot pen, and too many people do. Different cats have different needs, but ALL cats need the room and inspiration to be cats.

To successfully cage a cat you should understand his natural behaviors to most closely provide what he needs and to most safely confine him. Although individuals of several species may prowl by day, exotic cats are typically nocturnal. Except for Cheetahs, Lions and Tigers, the exotic feline is an exceptional climber. Servals and Caracals can climb well, but need incentive to do so. Margay, Ocelots and Leopards spend more time lounging in the trees than on the ground. Bobcats, Jungle Cats, Geoffrey Cats and all of the Lynxes are very active and are in and out of everything, all the time.

All cats swim if necessity demands it but Jaguars, Tigers, Servals and Fishing Cats live for it. Fishing cats and Servals will dive underwater for their food and although Tigers will dive, they usually prefer to “dog paddle” or just splash around in the water. Water loving cats will not be happy without a pool.

The behaviour of an exotic cat can be likened to that of the domestic cat on speed. All of this is said to prepare you to look around your home and envision the outdoor run as seen through the half crazed eyes of the exotic of your choice. The “tamed” wild cat does not discern between a tree and a hanging plant, or between vines and curtain rods. Your bubble bath or the fish tank are just as suitable “swimming holes” as a lake or stream. Exotic Cats urinate in the water, so you won’t want to leave dishes in the sink.

If you are building an enclosure for a pet that you have raised and who now is spraying everything in sight, the best option for the cat is an outdoor one that is at least 1200 square feet in size. The fencing should be twelve feet tall and made of six gauge chain welded cattle panels and completely roofed.

In these yards should be kiddie toys including wading pools, plastic forts, igloos, balls and safe shrubbery. Obviously, none of these plastic items are to be left unattended with the great cats. Except for the shrubbery everything else must be cleaned and disinfected regularly (like daily). A pool is great fun but a lot of work. It MUST be changed daily. Even the dirt will need “cleaning” and by this I mean that you will need to walk the yard daily and pick up feces, and on occasion you may need to lock the cats in the house for a few days and dust the yard with lime. Don’t return the cats to the dusted yard until after it has been washed off of the grass and leaves and into the soil.

We used to treat the cat yards twice a month for fleas, alternating between Bio-Halt Flea Nematodes and Sevin Dust 10 percent. Since our cats have been on Advantage this has not been necessary. We don’t mow the yard very often because the cats seem to really enjoy the jungle effect. Your neighbors may not share your appreciation of a Congo styled lawn scape, and this is something to consider. Keeping your neighbors happy can be what keeps you happy and this usually requires that they not be able to see, hear or smell your cats. In most cases you will be better off if they don’t even know about your cats. Having them for the purpose of showing off to your friends will probably mean that you will be asked to move or euthanize the pet one day.

For our Tigers we have a three acre pen that leads down into a spring fed lake. The fencing is 16 feet tall, six gauge (sometimes 5 gauge), four by six inch square welded wire. This pen has two eight foot square, concrete dens, and a safety pen for hurricanes, or so we can lock them up while cleaning their acreage. The safety pen is where we feed the cats so that they are accustomed to going inside. It is 900 square feet, with a top. When we clean the pen we coax them into the safety pen and shut them inside until we are finished. The safety pen must have a door that can be operated from outside. The safety pen and the safety gate are two separate enclosures. To include part of the lake in the Tiger pen we had to hire a dock and deck company to install the posts out in the water because it was fourteen feet deep in places. We hung the fence from the posts and attached shade cloth over that so that the cats would not swim out and hang on the wire. Inside the pen are stainless steel beer kegs, bowling balls (with the holes filled in) for toys and lots of shrubbery, initially… Palmettos are virtually indestructible and the yard was covered with them, but in just a few months they were trampled beyond recognition. We thought over an acre per Tiger would more than accommodate two yearling Tigers, but the foliage proves otherwise. The trees are all still standing but it was an established forest.

Most of our cages are 12 to 16 feet tall with a roof. They are built around trees so that the cats can get up into the lower branches.  Their concrete den, which is eight feet by twelve feet, by 2 feet high and is covered with concrete to look like rock and earth for insulation so that they look like hills in each cage.Our Leopards have pens that are more than 1200 square feet per cat and twelve feet high.

We were fortunate enough to fall into a once in a lifetime deal in which we were able to purchase thirty three acres of concrete platforms. These platforms stand two feet off the ground on their own legs and come in eight foot, ten foot and twelve foot widths. They are all eight feet long and can be stacked side by side. These would not be cost efficient to build, but many people pour concrete slabs on the ground with a slope to the outside and a gutter to guide waste water to a septic system.

All of the pens have at trees, shelves or logs elevated for lounging on. We suspend natural cat-walks with chain from the top of the pen, at different levels, so that the feline has much more running space and to encourage exercising by jumping from one cat-walk to another. We also hang hammocks made of natural fibers for their lounging pleasure.

Each cage has a toy called the ” Nearly Indestructible Ball” in a size relevant to the size of the cat and a variety of large bleached cow bones. A cat can easily get stir crazy in a static environment, so it is important to always be offering something different to smell, taste or touch. Cats like having their own space and enjoy marking it and letting others know that it is theirs, but they also enjoy new things. Just like human children, they enjoy playing with the box the toy came in more than with the toy itself. Cut a few holes in the box and it’s good entertainment for a day or two. Oddly enough, the biggest thrill you can give most cats is a pile of cut branches. Check your poisonous plant list first and then your yard trimmings can provide hours of fun and exercise.

The entry door to the pen should be wide enough to accommodate your carriers or catch pens and tall enough for you to walk in without stooping. We use 4 snap hooks to keep them shut and a lock. You should also attach a safety gate to your entry gate. This is a small cage that you open the gate and walk into, and then shut the gate behind you before opening the gate to the pen. It should be large enough to accommodate two people and a large carrier or a wheel barrow, without having both doors open. At any juncture where you will be handling a latch or accessing a food or water dish, we would recommend that you cover the adjoining area with a small mesh wire. It can be very hard to fumble with a latch and keep your eyes on the cat at the same time. This is more necessary in the case where a cat has his claws. Even if the existing wire is too small for the entire paw to fit through, just one hook of their razor sharp claws could take off a finger.

We do not recommend adjoining cages that share a common wall. Often cats that like each other have been known to suffer a nasty bite for sticking their extremities through the wire. We saw a gorgeous black Leopard once whose tail had been so badly mauled that it had to be amputated.

Privacy can be as important as space. If at all possible provide lush foliage as a visual screen between animals. Space the cats as far apart as is practical. They are solitary creatures, except for the Lions, and really appreciate their own territory. Even most lions that you may end up caring for were probably single pets and will not want to be kept in cages with other lions.

Our cages are truly cat-a-tats, but because they are on the ground, the cats must be wormed monthly here and probably at least quarterly in colder climates.

For open top pens we use a double row of hot wire that is powered by a solar unit that can withstand three days of total darkness, and this has proved successful in keeping lions and tigers in place.

 

 

Big Cat Enclosures at Big Cat Rescue

 

Below are the new cage designs Vernon Stairs implemented.  They are constructed of 6 gauge, galvanized, welded wire panels, twelve feet high, with roofs and are all in excess of 900 square feet and most in excess of 1200 square feet and many in excess of 2400 square feet.  They all have safety entrances and are designed to shut off one half of the cage at a time so that the volunteers can safely clean one side with the cat locked out and then shift the cat to the other side to clean the remainder.

They all incorporate feed boxes with built in water dishes in which the cats can be shut to medicate, vaccinate or the whole unit can be removed as a transport cage to go to the vet or to evacuate in a hurricane.  The water dishes are elevated to keep the cats from relieving themselves in the drinking water (as they will do).

Each cage has a sprinkler system and an underground, plastic den.  The den is easy to clean and insulated against the elements.  Each cage is heavily landscaped and has logs, trees, toys and perches to give the cat’s a feeling of safety.

This is one of our leopard cages and it is over 2400 square feet of floor space and is over twenty feet high as it encircles this tree.  (Notice the silhouette of the black leopard, Jumanji in the center branches) This cage is typical of our leopard and cougar cages and includes all of the features outlined above.  You can see the wire in the distant back ground and the white door to his feeding area.  This photo was taken from safely outside the cage, but due to the four by four openings the shot can look as though you were inside.

The cage at right is the Snow Leopard cage when it was being built and includes a freezer box den that is air-conditioned   and cleverly disguised as snowy rock covered ledges.  The cats can lay in the cool of their dens and look out at passerby’s.  The curvature of the wire makes posts and support beam unnecessary once the cage is completed and enables the viewer to focus on the animal and not on the cage.

Across the top you can see the wire supports used to bridge the 20 feet spanning the roofs.  Note the full size ladder in the background to get a feel for the size of the cage.  The rock work is concrete over metal lathe.   In some cages the rock work has waterfalls, dripping down into fish filled ponds.

Many of our Cat-A-Tats include ponds and waterfalls.  All of our many tigers have pools, ponds and waterfalls as did the Fishing Cats.

With a donation of $10,000.00, earmarked for cage construction, you can have a sign placed on the cage telling the world that you helped build the Cat-A-Tat.  This is great advertising for your business or corporation and greatly helps these magnificent cats.

Here is where we get the only hog ring pliers that work:  http://www.reddenmarine.com/pacific-mako-9000-wf-555-0-hog-ring-pliers.html

 

By Species State Requirements Our Cages
Lions and Tigers 240 square feet 1200- 136,000 sf
Leopards, Jaguars, Cougars 200 square feet 1200-6000 square feet
Lesser cats (Lynx, etc.) 72 square feet 1200-2400 square feet
Small cats (hybrid cats, etc.) 36 square feet 1000 -2000 square feet

 

USDA only requires that the cage be large enough for the animal to stand up and turnaround in and a lot of states use the USDA standard rather than set standards of their own.

When you visit the zoo and see those magnificent million dollar enclosures, what you don’t see are all the animals in tiny, off exhibit cages.  If animals must live in captivity, the least we can do is make them comfortable.

 

 

More info on caging an exotic cat.