CPR

CPR

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ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION & HEART MASSAGE

 

If the cat has stopped breathing and the heart has stopped beating there are two methods of resuscitation. Chest compression stimulates the heart to beat and if done correctly, can force air in and out of the lungs. If you cannot hear the intake and exhale of air, you should add mouth to nose forced respiration.

1. Feel for the heartbeat and watch closely to see if the chest is moving.

2. Open the mouth, wipe away fluids and check for something stuck in the mouth. If there is something stuck too far down use the Heimlich Maneuver, by laying the cat down on his right side. Place one hand on the belly and one on the back, just behind the back rib and exert four quick thrust. Repeat until the object is dislodged.

3. Lay the cat down on a flat surface with his right side down.

Natasha the Siberian Lynx

 

 

4. Pinch the cat with one hand, from the belly side, just behind the elbows and squeeze the chest sharply from side to side. Release quickly. Repeat six times and then wait five seconds to see if he takes a breath. Repeat until the cat begins breathing on his own.

5. If this is not causing the cat to breathe, pull his tongue forward and hold his mouth shut . Be careful not to pierce his tongue with his teeth.

6. Place your mouth over the cat’s nose and blow in until the chest rises, then release to allow the air back out. Do not blow too hard or the lungs could burst. Continue with the heart massage and blowing in the nose until the cat is breathing on his own or until all life signs have stopped for over five minutes.

This procedure can be used even on stillborn kittens with great success.

Prevention being the best remedy, you should know that some causes of a cessation of life signs are:

· Coma

· Prolonged Seizures

· Head Injury

· Poisoning

· Electric Shock

· Shock

· Choking

· Sudden Death

Don’t leave electrical cords plugged in or exposed. Don’t allow your cat to play with things that could be chewed up and choked on. Don’t allow your cat in contact with insecticides or toxins. They will chew through the bottle to get to something that will hurt them. Don’t allow your cat into an area from which he can escape, and make sure all of the exits from your home or his cage have safety entrances installed. If you can keep him safe from all of the above, the time will still come when he will find that window of opportunity to get into trouble, but you can limit his exposure to risk.

 

Note: I am not a veterinarian. Please consult a licensed veterinarian for the care of your exotic cat.

 

 

Note: I am not a medical doctor. Please consult a professional for human first aid.

 

Accidents

Accidents

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Accidents and Animal Injury

  • place animal in carrying case as quickly and gently as possible
  • notify  Director keep the animal warm, quiet, and isolated give water if dehydrated

ANIMAL HANDLING

Snow Leopard at Big Cat Rescue

Snow Leopard at Big Cat Rescue

The animals that you will be caring for at Big Cat Rescue will be cared for in a HANDS OFF fashion because they are wild animals. All of the animals possess effective means for defending themselves when they feel it is necessary, including teeth, claws, odor, etc. Remember, any animal can and will bite if sufficiently provoked or frightened – even the family dog. However, by following common sense rules and using your knowledge of the individual animal and its natural behaviors, no person is likely to be hurt.

You will be responsible for making the time to get thoroughly acquainted with the animals (also allowing them to become familiar with you). All of them have personalities; all have natural behaviors characteristic of the species. Your personal knowledge of the individual animal will be your greatest insurance against mishaps. The confidence you gain through experience will be sensed by the animal and will minimize the stress associated with being handled.

HANDLING ANIMALS FOR MEDICAL PURPOSES ONLY

 

  • use common sense, always work with animals in a calm, controlled, but confident manner
  • when approaching an animal, signal your presence by talking to the animal and make your movements toward it slow and deliberate
  • handle animals gently but firmly, be in control
  • during handling, provide reassurance to the animal through verbal and tactile (touch) communication
  • be receptive to the animal’s comfort/feelings; problems can be avoided through knowledge, sensitivity, and prevention
  • the keys to success in working with and training animals are patience, determination, and repetition

 

EMERGENCIES

 

Human First Aid

 

 

 

Note: I am not a medical doctor. Please consult a professional for human first aid.

 

IF YOU ARE BITTEN

  • don’t panic
  • enlist help from  Director, another Volunteer, or responsible group member
  • if necessary, replace animal in carrying case as calmly and quickly as possible
  • wash bite thoroughly, get first aid if needed
  • report injury to Operations Manager, help fill out accident report
  • report to closest hospital if necessary.

 

ANIMAL ESCAPE

  • avoid panic, maintain group control; instruct people to go to the nearest building or cage that they can be safely lock into
  • attempt to recapture animal, enlist assistance of another Volunteer or  Operations Manager
  • report incident to Director  and local authorities

 

Juliet Simms

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JULIET SIMMS CHANNELS HER INNER WILD CHILD DURING

HER VISIT TO BIG CAT RESCUE SANCTUARY

 

Juliet-Simms-Wild-Child

THE EVENT IS TAKING PLACE APRIL 19TH

AT THE BIG CAT RESCUE SANCTUARY,

LOCATED AT 12802 EASY STREET TAMPA FL 33625

STARTING AT 3:30PM

 

April 9, 2013, Los Angeles, CA; Big Cat Rescue invites Republic Records recording artist Juliet Simms to Big Cat Rescue’s sanctuary located in Tampa, Florida on April 19th to honor her efforts in the fight against animal cruelty. In March, Florida-native Simms partnered with Closets for Causes, donating beloved pieces from her personal closet to be sold in an online auction with proceeds benefitting Big Cat Rescue.

 

“I’m humbled to have the opportunity to work with an organization like Big Cat Rescue, whose work with cats is so important to me as a massive animal lover. Cats specifically have always held a special place in my heart and life and I’m hopeful that the funds raised through our partnership with Closets for Causes will help them continue doing the great work they do!” says Juliet about her auction and upcoming visit.

 

“In honor of the great success of the auction and campaign, we are pleased to announce the press day at Big Cat Rescue. Juliet’s visit to the sanctuary she helped benefit will be a great moment for all parties.

The press day will be a unique chance for Juliet to interact with the staff and witness, first-hand, both the daily activities that take place at the sanctuary and the ways in which her funds are benefitting Big Cat Rescue” says Talia Bella, Founder and CEO at Closets for Causes.

 

Hosted by Director of Donor Appreciation Jeff Kremer, the event will see Juliet expressing her passion for helping the cats in a day filled with meet and greets and photo-ops. The generous team from Big Cat Rescue will arrange for senior animal keepers to demonstrate how they care for the magnificent creatures that call the sanctuary home.

 

“We are very excited to be partnering together with Ms. Juliet Simms and our wonderful friends at Closets for Causes” said Jeff Kremer, Big Cat Rescue’s Director of Donor Appreciation. “The sanctuary envisions a world where the animals we share it with are treated with compassion and respect and it is only by working ‘hand in hand’ with such like-minded friends that Big Cat Rescue is able to continue to make a positive difference in both the animal as well as human world that we share in.”

 

Juliet will also be honored with a commemorative ceramic donor recognition tile featuring her favorite big cat species.

 

Big Cat Rescue is the largest accredited sanctuary in the world dedicated entirely to abused and abandoned big cats. They are home to over 100 lions, tigers, bobcats, cougars and other species most of whom have been abandoned, abused, orphaned, saved from being turned into fur coats, or retired from performing acts. Their dual mission is to provide the best home they can for the cats in their care and educate the public about the plight of these majestic animals, both in captivity and in the wild, to end abuse and avoid extinction.

 

ABOUT CLOSETS FOR CAUSES www.closetsforcauses.com

Closets for Causes is a unique cause-marketing agency dedicated to cleaning out celebrity closets, liquidating their items at online public auction and donating the proceeds to the charity of their choice. The results are brand loyalty, nonprofit enthusiasm and good celebrity buzz– all while raising serious money for causes that make a difference.

Twitter: @closets4causess

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Closets-For-Causes

Instagram: closetsforcauses

 

ABOUT JULIET SIMMS

Wild child, rock star, fashion muse, and protégé to the infamous CeeLo Green, Juliet Simms is a multifaceted singer/songwriter currently signed to Republic Records. Following a runner-up finish on Season 2 of NBC’s hit show THE VOICE, she is set to release her debut solo album this summer. A commanding vocalist who’s been singing since she could walk, Juliet channels her emotions into her music through carefully chosen lyrics and is known for her signature raspy growl. Emerging as a modern day Joan Jett, Juliet is now evolving her career and building on her rocker roots as the former lead vocalist for the rock band Automatic Loveletter, where she established her presence among the rock world. The first single, “Wild Child” – an unapologetic ode to living life on the edge– is now available at iTunes. Juliet can be seen this summer touring nationwide on the VANS Warped Tour.

Follow Juliet Simms on Twitter at @julietsimmsALL

Help make British animal circus ban a reality

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Help make British animal circus ban a reality

 

 

Today, the British government announced a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses, to be introduced by 1 December 2015. Finally, a date has been set for the ban that was promised over a year ago.

 

Following a campaign of nearly 25 years, this is an historic and hard fought victory in a campaign that has been driven by the evidence ADI has collected during our investigations of British circuses.

 

It has been a long and difficult journey, but every time we hit a stumbling block we came back with yet another

 

1


Anne the elephant – saved from the circus and her owner brought to justice, following ADI’s expose

investigation exposing the cruel reality for animals in the circus, forcing the issue back onto the political agenda.  We have repeatedly shown not only the violence but also the deprivation and confinement these animals routinely endure. ADI’s studies showed that, given the circumstances of constant travel in lightweight, mobile and collapsible facilities, travelling circuses simply cannot provide the facilities the animals need to maintain optimum physical and psychological health.

 

It is not the end of the road yet.  The law could be amended before it is actually introduced to Parliament and then we must get it passed.  Nevertheless we believe we are on the road to victory.

 

Also this week a Bill to ban the use of all animals in circuses in Colombia goes before their Senate having already been passed by Colombia’s House of representatives.  ADI is campaigning intensely to the last to make this a reality for animals.

 

Over 20 countries have now introduced national legislation prohibiting the use of animals in circuses andhundreds of towns and cities around the world, all over Europe, South America and Asia, have looked at the evidence and decided to stop animal circuses from visiting their communities.

 

We urgently need your support to continue our investigations and campaigns. We are making a difference and saving animals, but we cannot continue without your support.  Please donate today and help us make the British ban a reality.

 

Make a donation to ADI

Contact your MP today and ask them to vote for the circus ban

Animal Defenderse International, Millbank Tower, Millbank, LONDON, SW1P 4QP, UK.
Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340

Kittens and Cubs

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KITTENS AND CUBS

 

Big Cat Rescue has evolved since its inception in 1992. By 1997 we had seen enough of the abuse and abandonment caused by the pet trade that we had previously engaged in to know that there was no reason to breed exotic animals for lives in cages. As a result we increased our efforts through spaying, neutering and cage building to ensure that we would no longer be a part of the problem. As we have continued to learn about the causes of so much suffering we have become active in stopping the exotic pet trade through education and legislation.  The following is provided only for those who have already made the mistake of supporting the pet trade so that the animal in your care does not suffer even more after being ripped from his mother. With more than 25 years experience, with every sort of exotic cat, I can assure you that there is nothing you can do to raise up an exotic cat to be a housepet.  It just isn’t possible.  No matter how young you neuter or spay the cats, both male and female, ALWAYS spray when they become adults.  The suggestions below are just so that you don’t become another one of the 98% who kill their exotic pet in the first two years.

 

 

If you have never raised an exotic cat up from a kitten, then nothing you have ever done will prepare you for the heartaches and headaches that you will experience during this most crucial time. There is no substitute for their mother’s love and if you have decided to try and be a surrogate mother you have taken on the responsibility of a lifetime of care. This is not a position to take lightly and we cannot emphasize strongly enough how much hard work and dedication will be required of you. Once the cub has reached sexual maturity you will not be able to trust this relationship but this will make the stress of life in captivity around humans a little less onerous for the animal.

 

Most breeder leave kittens with their mothers for a minimum of ten days, or until the eyes open, for several reasons. The mother’s first milk in the first 48 hours contains the colostrum necessary for the kitten to initiate it’s own immune system. Without this colostrum, which is not available to the public in synthetic form, the cub will have no natural immunities and will be in severe danger until after the second booster shot, which will be given at eight weeks. This is a long time to hold your breath. Even with novice mothers and potentially dangerous ones, it is still better to let the kitten get that first milk. The eyes usually open at ten days and if the kitten can be left with the mother until then there is less likelihood of eye infection, if she is properly cleaning and grooming her young. If your kitten was taken from his mother before then you are probably fighting a losing battle to keep him alive.

 

Everyone will want to see and handle the cubs, but this can be very stressful for the kits and stress can kill them as quickly as any virus. Studies on puppies have reported that interrupted sleep can lead to death. In the wild, the exotics must be especially alert, and even in captivity a cat will be aroused by the quietest approach. Keep them in a warm, dark, secured, quiet place overnight. To help accustom the new cubs to your smell, you can bed them in a soft Tee shirt that you have worn all day, as long as it does not have other cat “germs” on it. Cats will recognize you as much by your smell as any other factor and for this reason we try to keep that smell consistent by using the same laundry soap, shampoos, body soaps, etc.

 

Food: Nothing we have to offer is going to taste or feel like “mom” and if we try to introduce some foreign food and container right away the kittens are going to put up a huge fight and it gets your whole relationship off to a bad start. (Except for kits who may have been pulled due to the Dam’s inadequate milk supply. If they are restless and nursing on their feet or bedding then we will offer them something to drink right away) By early morning the kits are HUNGRY and ready (sort of) to accept anything. It’s almost always still a challenge, but it’s not an all out struggle and by the third feeding they have usually got the hang of nursing from a hard rubber nipple and a taste for that otherwise yucky stuff that makes the hungries go away. (At this point you have to wonder who you thought you were to take this baby away from his mother.  The kitten is miserable and the mother will be crying for days for her lost offspring.  If you bought a kitten to bottle raise, you supported this horrid practice.)

 

WASH your hands before and after handling the kittens and we suggest sterile aprons or hospital gowns be worn over your clothing when you handle the cubs. Handle them as needed, but resist picking them up as much as possible for the first three weeks, especially the first week of their life. We treat them as much like their mother would as possible by keeping them in a “nest” and feeding and cleaning them within this makeshift nest. The nest material will have to be replaced frequently and the kitten will have to be picked up, but try to keep it to a minimum at first.

 

At three weeks they are better able to handle being picked up and this is when you will be getting them accustomed to frequent handling. Begin laying the kit on his back in your hand or lap and rubbing his belly and under his chin. When the cat is grown you will want him to feel comfortable with this behavior because you will need to inspect, groom or pick fleas or burrs from this area. If not trained young that he can trust you to touch his most vulnerable spots, you will have a hard time trying to convince him later.

 

The bonding that you will do with your exotic kitten during these most crucial times will last a lifetime. Just pulling the kitten out every two hours, feeding him, helping him eliminate waste and putting him back in the carrier, may keep him alive, but he deserves so much more. Do not wake the kitten to play, but if you see he is awake take the time to nuzzle, snuggle and caress. If you cannot drop what you are doing every time, just the warm, loving sounds of your voice can convey the love you feel. The cub will remember these early times and will respond a lifetime to familiar words, feels and games. I have long hair that always falls down around the kits when I am tending to them and all of my adults now love hair. We have adult Bobcats and Siberian Lynxes that will jump onto a strangers shoulders and nuzzle in their hair like they have known the person all their lives.

 

These learned responses will stay with the cat throughout his life, so choose your games wisely. Our 150 pound Leopards still love to leap up on our shoulders and snuggle in our hair, and this is NOT a good thing. We have since learned that any cat, full grown, we cannot carry must be trained to keep all four on the floor. My late husband nearly had his head severed at the neck, when in play, Simba a full grown Asian Leopard leaped some twenty feet across the pen, expecting Don to catch him. The cat was smiling, a big open mouthed smile as he sailed through the air. Don caught him, breaking the impact and fall, but Simba’s upper canine raked across Don’s neck, from his ear down to the other side of his Adam’s apple. I didn’t know a person could live through such a bad injury to the neck, but it did heal in time.

 

Even though you spend all of these sleepless days and nights training your cub to know and love you like a mother, consider the reality:  In nature, by the time the cub is old enough to go out on its own (1-5 years) it must stake out its own territory and if its mother were to end up crossing the line she would be killed because nature has hardwired the exotic cats for survival of the fittest and you will never be any match for an exotic cat.