Cat Laws

Cat Laws

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Action YOU Can Take to Save Big Cats and their Cubs

Due to the government web forms that receive our data, only people who are constituents of certain representatives can contact their legislators.  Please do not use a fake address to game the system as it renders your real identity as useless when there are matters that you really can speak out about.  We try to only email you with actions you can really take, but if you put in a false address, then you won’t get the action alerts that affect you most.  There is something on this page that everyone can do, so please pick your battles wisely.

Salsa is our service provider that makes it possible for you to find the right people to contact by just typing in your zip code.  Don’t worry, we hate spam too and we will not share or sell your personal info outside of the specific targets you are contacting.

 

U.S. Residents Only

Most Important Action You Can Take for Big Cats and their Cubs

Stop Big Cat Abuse (US ONLY)

Visit, Call or Send an Email to your Congressional Representative asking them to champion the Big Cat Public Safety Act here:  http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=16017

 

Prevent Animal Cruelty & Torture (US ONLY)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=14519

 

Everyone

Protect the Florida Panther

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=18256

Ban Cougar Trophy Hunting in Wyoming (EVERYONE)

https://hq.salsalabs.com/salsa/hq/p/dia/action3/common/hq/edit?object=action&key=16920

Ban Trophy Hunting in New Jersey (EVERYONE)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=16628

Pledge to Never Go to the Circus! (EVERYONE)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=13749

Cub Abuse at Colossalcon Kalahari Resort (EVERYONE)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=13822

 

 

By State

KS

Oppose Bill to Overturn Big Cat Protections

Kansas Residents Only! Senate Bill 97 seeks to overturn protections for big cats and YOU!  Please ask your Senator to vote NO on this bill. We make it easy here: http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=17808

 

MO

No Circus Exemption (MO ONLY)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=13899

NY

Ban Cat Declawing

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=17422

OK

Ban Contact w/ Big Cats (OK ONLY)

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=13901

 

USFWS Rescinds Generic Tiger Loophole

USFWS Rescinds Generic Tiger Loophole

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Strengthens Protections for Captive Tigers under the Endangered Species Act

April 5, 2016

In an effort to strengthen protections for certain captive tigers under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a rule declaring that captive “generic” tigers — tigers of unknown genetic background or crosses between two different subspecies of tigers — are no longer exempt from certain permitting requirements.

Anyone selling tigers across state lines must now first obtain an interstate commerce permit or register under the Captive-bred Wildlife Registration program regardless of whether it is a generic tiger or a pure subspecies.

“Removing the loophole that enabled some tigers to be sold for purposes that do not benefit tigers in the wild will strengthen protections for these magnificent creatures and help reduce the trade in tigers that is so detrimental to wild populations,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “This will be a positive driver for tiger conservation.”

The wild tiger is under severe threat from habitat loss and the demand for tiger parts in traditional Asian medicine. Once abundant throughout Asia, today the species numbers only 3,000-5,000 animals in small fragmented groups. As a result, tigers are protected as endangered under the ESA and under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) – the highest levels of international protection. Tigers readily breed in captivity, however, and the number of captive tigers in the United States alone likely exceeds the numbers found in the wild, although the exact number is currently unknown.

The Service has worked with international partners to implement measures that ensure wild tigers survive in their native habitats and that captive tigers do not contribute to the illegal trade in tiger parts.

While this new rule does not prevent individuals from owning generic tigers, extending the permitting or registration requirement to all tigers strengthens the Service’s efforts in addressing the illegal wildlife trade, both domestically and internationally. This rule results in a uniform policy that applies to all tigers and will help Service law enforcement agents enforce the ESA.

The final rule will publish in the Federal Register on April 6, 2016, and will go into effect 30 days after publication on May 6, 2016.

For a copy of the final rule, please go to http://www.fws.gov/policy/frsystem/default.cfm and click on 2016 Final Rules for Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants.

Note: Big Cat Rescue has been pressuring the USFWS since at least 2007 to rescind this loophole and on 8/22/11 after a meeting with the USFWS the Generic Tiger issue was published to the Federal Register for public comment and got over 15,000 comments in support of our request to ban the breeding of non purebred tigers. Carole Baskin emailed those in charge, at least every six months, during this 9 year process, always asking when they would finally take action.  According to their Q&A it sounds like the USFWS may still rubber stamp activities that really don’t help tiger conservation, but it’s a step. Regulations can’t work, because USDA and USFWS don’t have the resources nor apparently the will to enforce the weak rules they have, so that is why we need an all out ban on the private possession of big cats.  You can help get that done at http://BigCatAct.com

Questions and Answers

U.S. Captive-bred Inter-subspecific Crossed or Generic Tigers

Final Rule

What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking?

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a rule that strengthens protections for certain captive tigers under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final rule declares that captive “generic tigers” (Panthera tigris) (i.e., specimens not identified or identifiable as members of Bengal, Sumatran, Siberian or Indochinese subspecies (P. t. tigris, P. t. sumatrae, P. t. altaica and P. t. corbetti, respectively)) are no longer exempt from certain permitting requirements.

Anyone selling tigers across state lines must now first obtain an interstate commerce permit or register under the Captive-bred Wildlife Registration (CBW) program, regardless of whether it is a generic tiger or a pure subspecies.

What is a generic tiger?

Inter-subspecific crossed or “generic” tigers are of unknown genetic origin and are typically not maintained in a manner to ensure that inbreeding or other inappropriate matings of animals do not occur.

What is the CBW program?

In 1979, the Service established Captive-bred Wildlife (CBW) regulations to reduce federal permitting requirements and facilitate the breeding of endangered and threatened species for conservation purposes. Under the CBW program, otherwise prohibited activities, such as interstate commerce, are authorized, but only when the activities can be shown to enhance the propagation or survival of the species. Registrants of the CBW program must provide a written annual report with information on activities including births, deaths and transfers of specimens.

Why were generic tigers exempted from the CBW?

In 1998, the Service amended the CBW regulations to delete the requirement to register under the program for holders of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers. This exemption was based on the alleged lack of conservation value of these specimens due to their mixed or unknown genetic composition, and the belief there was conservation value in exhibition designed to educate the public about the ecological role and conservation needs of the species. The intention behind the exemption was for the Service to focus its oversight on populations of “purebred” animals of the various tiger subspecies to further their conservation in the wild. Despite this exemption, inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers are still protected under the ESA. Tigers have been listed under the ESA as endangered since 1970.

Why should generic tigers now be included under CBW registration?

By exempting holders of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers from the CBW registration process in 1998, the Service may have inadvertently suggested that the breeding of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers qualifies as conservation. By removing the CBW exemption, the Service can reinforce the value of conservation breeding of individual tiger subspecies and discourage the breeding of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers. The Service has finalized this change to the regulations to ensure the agency can maintain strict oversight of captive tigers in the United States.

Withdrawing the CBW exemption for generic tigers would also close a loophole in current federal and state regulations that could allow for the use of captive U.S. tigers in trade in a manner inconsistent with conservation of the species. It places the United States in a stronger position in international negotiations regarding commercial tiger breeding farms in Asia and trade in tiger parts.

How will removal of the generic tiger exemption from the CBW regulations impact current owners of generic tigers?

Removing the CBW exemption for generic tigers will not result in control of private ownership, and will not impact sale of generic tigers within their state of residence (intrastate commerce) or non-commercial movement across state lines. However, other activities, such as the sale of animals across state lines (interstate commerce), would require authorization from the Service before such actions could be taken.

While this new rule does not prevent individuals from owning generic tigers, the permitting or registration requirement for all tigers strengthens the Service’s efforts in addressing the illegal wildlife trade, both domestically and internationally. Tigers are listed under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which includes species threatened with extinction. Trade in specimens of these species is permitted only in exceptional circumstances.

This final rule results in a uniform policy that applies to all tigers and will help Service law enforcement agents enforce the ESA.

Would all private owners have to apply for a permit before breeding their tigers?

Private owners would still be able to breed generic tigers without a permit for sale or commercial purposes within their state or for non-commercial movement across state lines, provided that you meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act.

I own a male and female tiger and would like to breed them so that I can give a cub to my daughter. Would I need to apply for a permit under this new regulation?

If you plan to give the cub away as opposed to selling it, you would not need to apply for a permit, regardless of the recipient’s state, provided that you meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act if the cub is going across state lines. If you have additional cubs in the litter, you could sell them within your state to someone else who resides in the same state or donate them to sanctuaries or others, either inside or outside of your state. Again, you would need to meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act if moving tigers across state lines.

I’m a private owner of tigers and I often display them at fairs and festivals in other states. Would the new regulation prohibit me from doing this?

The new regulation would still allow generic tigers to cross state lines for exhibition purposes, as long as the tigers are not to be sold or offered for sale.

How can I meet the standard to get a permit or register under the CBW regulations to sell a generic tiger across state lines if the Service is saying that generic tigers have no any conservation value?

The CBW registration was set up to allow institutions that were breeding listed species for conservation purposes to sell animals across state lines to other registered facilities. While it is true that breeding these animals would not provide a direct conservation benefit to the species in the wild and therefore the Service probably would not register a facility with generic tigers, it is still possible to obtain an individual permit authorizing interstate commerce with a generic tiger if the applicant meets the issuance criteria established in our regulations, i.e., if the parties involved in the sale are carrying out activities that enhance the propagation or survival of the species. While it is unlikely that such a commercial transaction would provide a direct benefit to the species, such as reintroduction, there may be indirect benefits that could be obtained from the transaction. It should also be noted that the requirement to show this benefit could be met through an individual or institution, or a group of individuals or institutions together, working to provide a benefit to the species in the wild.

For example, if one or more zoological institutions were purchasing inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers for educational and display purposes, they could provide support (e.g., via the solicitation of donations

from visitors) to carry out on-the-ground conservation efforts in the tiger’s native range. The Service prefers a clear on-going commitment of several years on the part of the applicant for such conservation or research support. This on-going commitment could be fulfilled by a group of institutions working together to maximize their resources for the benefit of tigers in the wild.

What will the economic impact be on the public and small businesses?

The Service does not have data on how many businesses are involved in the interstate commerce of generic tigers, the number of businesses for which an interstate commerce permit or registration in the CBW program will be a viable option, and the economic impacts if prospective applicants are unable to either secure an interstate commerce permit or registration in the CBW program. Nonetheless, the Service believes that the regulatory change is not major in scope and would create only a modest financial or paperwork burden on the affected members of the general public.

This rule would not have a significant economic effect. If individuals or breeding operations wish to carry out an otherwise prohibited activity, such as interstate commerce, it would require that a permit application be submitted to the Service at a cost of $100-$200 per application. Submission of an application, however, would not be a guarantee that authorization will be granted.

LawEnforcement

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Law Enforcement should not be confronted with dangerous lions and tigers

Federal legislation will end this problem.

This bill will save lives, big cats, tax dollars and law enforcement resources.

For more information about this important issue or to submit an endorsement from your office, please contact Jennifer Leon at 813.393.6066 or Jennifer.Leon@BigCatRescue.org.

PURPOSE

HR 3546 / S 2541 is a common sense and urgently needed solution to the problem of dangerous big cats kept in unsafe and abusive circumstances in the United States. Tigers, lions, and other exotic cats kept in people’s homes, backyards, and roadside zoos pose a serious and completely unnecessary risk to public safety, law enforcement and first responders.

The bill amends the Captive Wildlife Safety Act to prohibit breeding and phase out the private possession of lions, tigers and other big cats in the exotic pet trade. It is narrowly focused on privately owned big cats and includes exemptions for zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), sanctuaries, universities and traveling circuses. Current owners are grandfathered in and simply required to register their animals with the USDA.

BACKGROUND

• An estimated 10,000 to 20,000 big cats are owned as pets or maintained in ill-equipped roadside zoos and traveling exhibits in the United States. Nobody knows for sure how many because no government agency tracks the animals.

• Since 1990 there have been over 740 dangerous incidents involving big cats – tigers, lions, cougars and others. Five children and 16 adults have been killed and scores of people have been mauled. Big cats pose a serious threat to public safety and the safety of law enforcement officials who must come face to face with these dangerous cats when they escape or attack.

• Private possession and breeding of big cats contributes to illegal international wildlife trafficking. The illegal trade in big cat parts like bones and skins is big business and there is no way to know how many U.S.-born cats are disposed of or when their parts enter the black market trade.

• Big cats cannot be domesticated. Unlike companion animals that have been domesticated over centuries, big cats retain their natural instinct to hunt and attack.

• Private owners are not able to control and manage dangerous big cats. The cats are frequently housed in dilapidated cages that are unlikely to hold them during natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and tornadoes. Law enforcement officers and the public would unnecessarily be put at risk when such disasters strike.

• This is a problem that requires a federal solution. The regulatory patchwork of laws in our states currently fails to protect public safety, law enforcement and animal welfare.

The Big Cat Public Safety Act (HR 3546 / S2541) will ensure big cats only live in secure facilities that can properly provide for them and do not diminish public safety.

For more information about this important issue or to submit an endorsement from your office, please contact Jennifer Leon at 813.393.6066 or Jennifer.Leon@BigCatRescue.org.

Important Resources

BCPSA-Fact-Sheet-HR3546-S2541

Cougar-Escape-Dayton-Ohio-Tim-Harrison-2011

FACA-Endorsement-Signed-2015

Hurricane-Ike-Texas-2008

NACA-2015-Endorsement

Sheriff-Lutz-letter -Feb-2016

Zanesville-2011

USDA Cracks Down on Abuse of Tiger Cubs

USDA Cracks Down on Abuse of Tiger Cubs

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United States Department of Agriculture Cracks Down on Abuse of Tiger Cubs by Roadside Menageries

In response to a 2012 legal petition filed by The Humane Society of the United States, World Wildlife Fund, Detroit Zoological Society, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Born Free USA, Big Cat Rescue, Fund for Animals and Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, the U.S. Department of Agriculture issued guidance making clear that exhibitors violate the Animal Welfare Act by allowing members of the public to handle or feed infant exotic cats like tigers, lions, cheetahs, jaguars or leopards.

“We applaud USDA for taking this first step to put roadside zoos and the public on notice that federal law prohibits using infant cubs for photographic opportunities and interactive experiences,” said Anna Frostic, senior attorney for wildlife & animal research at The Humane Society of the United States, “but it is imperative that the agency take additional action to prohibit public contact with big cats, bears and nonhuman primates of any age.”

As documented in the petition, dozens of facilities across the country routinely breed and acquire exotic feline species – all of which are listed under the Endangered Species Act – to produce an ample supply of cubs for profit. “Both animals and people are put in harm’s way when big cats are used for public contact exhibition – young cubs are particularly susceptible to disease, especially when deprived of necessary maternal care, and cubs quickly grow into dangerous predators that can cause serious injury to adults and children,” said Jeff Flocken, North America regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

Big Cat Coalition Logos

In contrast to zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, “there are thousands of big cats in private menageries in the U.S., and these facilities do not have the resources or expertise to safely and responsibly care for dangerous wild animals,” said Ron Kagan, executive director and CEO of the Detroit Zoological Society. Conservation professionals agree that endangered and threatened species like tigers, lions, and apes should not be bred for commercial purposes.

“The insatiable demand for cubs and baby primates used at interactive exhibits fuels a vicious cycle of breeding and exploitation. It is standard in this horrific industry to separate babies from their mothers, and then discard them when they grow too big for handling,” explained Adam Roberts, CEO of Born Free USA.

The mass propagation of tigers in the U.S. has resulted in a captive population that is nearly twice the number of tigers that exist in the wild. “Cubs used for petting, if they survive, typically spend many years living in substandard facilities and the few who are lucky enough to eventually end up at good sanctuaries typically arrive with medical issues caused by deficient care,” said Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue.

In addition to these animal welfare, public safety and conservation concerns, “the surplus of exotic animals in roadside zoos and other substandard facilities puts an enormous financial burden on the accredited sanctuaries that provide lifetime care for abandoned and seized animals,” according to Michael Markarian, president of The Fund for Animals.

Investigations have revealed that using tiger cubs for photo ops and play sessions can yield over $20,000 per month for a roadside zoo, fueling demand for more and more cubs – but once the cats mature, their future is uncertain. “There is just not enough space or resources at accredited sanctuaries to support the demand created by this irresponsible breeding,” said Kellie Heckman, executive director of Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries.

Further, “the fate of captive tigers in the U.S. has serious implications for the conservation of tigers in the wild,” said Leigh Henry, senior policy advisor for Wildlife Conservation at World Wildlife Fund, “strengthened regulation of U.S. captive tigers will help ensure that captive-bred tiger parts don’t enter the black market and stimulate the demand that drives the poaching of wild tigers.”

While there is still much more work to be done to fully address the coalition’s petition to completely prohibit public contact with big cats, bears and nonhuman primates of any age, this is a significant step forward for the U.S. to improve its oversight of captive tigers and lead by example to encourage other countries, like China, to reduce the demand for tigers and tiger products.

See the 2016-USDA-Guidance-Cub-Handling

Larry Wallach Exploiting Cubs

Larry Wallach Exploiting Cubs

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This is Larry Wallach from New York.

 

Larry Wallach Exploiting Tiger CubHe has been exploiting tiger cubs and charging the public to hold them for over a decade. In 2012, USDA filed a complaint against Larry Wallach for a litany of animal welfare violations, including failure to provide vet care to the cats and stressing out his tiger cubs with the constant cub handling.

He was set up at the Cacklebery Campground in New Smyrna Beach, FL with 2 young tiger cubs but after hearing from 1,495 of you, they asked him to leave!

They say he’s moved off their property and setting up shop on Main Street.  We are trying to find out the owner of the property, so we can let them know that animal lovers hate this sort of abuse.

He’s preying upon the hundreds of thousands of visitors in the area for Bike Week. Florida Fish & Wildlife sent an investigator but unfortunately said what he’s doing is legal. But we know you agree with us that just because it’s legal does NOT make it right.

How can someone like Wallach with a long list of USDA violations dating back to 2008 STILL BE OPERATING AND EXPLOITING CUBS? How can USDA and the Florida Wildlife Commission look at the raw, oozing sore on the cub’s nose, from frantically dragging his face back and forth across the cage wire, and not treat it as a violation of the Endangered Species Act?  It’s heartbreaking. But we CAN end this abuse with the passage of the Big Cat Public Safety Act.

TAKE ACTION!

Take action here:  http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51389/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=17851

 

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IL Ban Bobcat Pelt Sales

IL Ban Bobcat Pelt Sales

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Ban the Sale of Bobcat Pelts in Illinois

We don’t know many people in IL so every single one of you makes a huge difference.

I usually try to make these things as easy as possible for our cat loving fans to do, but some states make it difficult.  Despite much opposition from people like you IL opened up bobcat hunting and trapping, so animal activists have countered with a bill to ban the sale of the pelts.

If they can’t profit from it, then it will reduce the number of bobcats who are tortured and killed.

Please save bobcats from suffering by taking the steps below:

Illinois supporters ONLY can support the bill by clicking here:

http://my.ilga.gov/WitnessSlip/Create/91620?committeeHearingId=13478&LegislationId=91620&SCommittees3%2F16%2F2016-page=1&committeeid=0&chamber=S&nodays=7&_=1457556845203

 

Here are the steps for showing support.

 

Section I IDENTIFICATION

Fill out name and address info

Use “Big Cat Rescue” for Firm/Business etc (or however you’d like supporters to identify themselves)

My Bobcat is in Rehab TEE Black

Big Cat Rescue saves bobcats who have been injured and rehabs them for release back to the wild. Every shirt sold helps fund our bobcat rehab program.

Use “Citizen” or “Individual” for Title

Fill in email and phone info

Section II REPRESENTATION

Use “myself”

Section III POSITION

Check “Proponent”

Section IV TESTIMONY

Check “Record of Appearance Only”

 

Thank you for taking the time to help save bobcats in Illinois from hunters and trappers.  To learn why so many bobcats are being trapped in the U.S. read this report on the huge numbers of our native bobcats who are being trapped and killed to be sold in Russia.  Be ware, the images are graphic, but the numbers are even more frightening.  http://bigcatrescue.org/trade-in-bobcats-and-lynx-2004-2008/