Big Cat Rescue Wants to be the Only Big Cat Sanctuary

Big Cat Rescue Wants to be the Only Big Cat Sanctuary

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That is the lie that animal abusers tell everyone to try and change the subject from protecting exotic cats to a message of mere competition.

Lion vs Tiger

 

They trot out their modified version of our 20 year plan to back up their ridiculous claims, but they leave out the most important part of the plan, which is that there no longer be big cats suffering in captivity, and thus no longer a need for sanctuaries, including Big Cat Rescue’s sanctuary.

As the public becomes better educated about why it is so wrong to breed wild cats for life in cages, they will cease to support industries that breed them as pay to play props, for circuses and other abusive purposes.  There will temporarily be an increased need for real sanctuaries, which are those who meet the following standards.

1.  Real sanctuaries do not breed exotic cats for life in cages.

2.  Real sanctuaries do not buy wild cats.

3.  Real sanctuaries do not sell their wildlife.

4.  Real sanctuaries do not let the public, nor their staff or volunteers handle the big cats, other than for veterinary purposes.

5.  Real sanctuaries do not endanger the public and the big cats by taking them off site for exhibition.

 

Big Cat Rescue LOVES real sanctuaries and helps them by:

 

1.  Providing guidance on best practices to help the sanctuary qualify for and obtain accreditation through the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries.

2. Hosting workshops and conferences for those who want to do the right thing for wild animals.

3.  Training volunteers and international interns in understanding that each animal is an individual who is to be respected and treated with dignity.

4.  Sending work groups of our own volunteers out to help after disasters and when other sanctuaries are short handed.

5.  Sharing the secrets of our success with those who demonstrate clearly that they are putting the animals first.

 

Those who exploit wild animals for their own gain hate us because they don’t want the public to know that:

 

1.  There is no reason to breed big cats in cages, as none of them in private hands can ever be set free.

2.  There is no captive breeding program that benefits conservation, other than AZA administered SSP programs.

3.  Paying to play with a cub or see one on display actually harms conservation efforts.

4.  Tigers could disappear from the wild because of the smoke screen caused by their legal breeding of generic tigers.

5.  A ban on private possession is the first step toward saving tigers in the wild.

Exploiters claim that if the Big Cats & Public Safety Act were to pass that they would be put out of business and wouldn’t be able to help “rescue” lions, tigers, leopards, ligers and other exotic cats, but that isn’t true.  Big Cat Rescue is one of the most successful sanctuaries in the world and we do it by being open, honest and treating the cats with kindness and respect.  We want sanctuaries to thrive, and they can do that if they employ the same attitudes and behaviors that we have in being a real sanctuary.

Any real sanctuary, who is doing their work for the animals and not their own sense of satisfaction, will share our goal of a world where all wild cats live free.

Now at Big Cat Rescue Oct 3 2014

Now at Big Cat Rescue Oct 3 2014

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Genie the Sandcat is rushed to the vet when her keepers note that she is acting weird.

Vet-Genie-Sandcat_1094

Genie Sandcat was sedated in a glass box used for domestic cats.

 

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This was to make sedation easier on her since she is only 3.3 pounds and 14 years old.

 

Vet-Genie-Sandcat_1103

Dr. Wynn keeps a close eye on her vitals.

 

Vet-Genie-Sandcat_1104

The monitors are just all over the place, so she has to rely on feel, sound and instincts.

 

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For such an old and tiny cat, Genie Sandcat has some fearsome teeth!

 

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The tiniest mask straps are too big, so Carole holds the gas mask in place.

 

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Sandcats are the softest of the exotic cat species.

 

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No spinal issues and her lungs don’t look terrible, but she has a case of bronchitis.

 

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This is good news, because Genie Sandcat is given a long lasting antibiotic shot and has a good chance at recovery.

 

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Dr. Wynn gives her fluids, steroids and antibiotics to help tiny little Genie fight off her symptoms.

 

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Genie Sandcat’s paw is the size of the tip of Jamie Veronica’s finger.

 

Vet-Genie-Sandcat-paws_1102

 

Sandcat paws are fully furred on the bottom for running on desert sands.

 

Violations at Big Cat Facilities 2011-2014

 

The USDA site doesn’t work most of the time and when it does it is so slow that most browsers will time out and quit before you can download the information you are looking for.  This information is current as of Oct. 3, 2014.

USDA Facilities with big cats who have had citations

USDA Facilities with big cats who have had repeat violations

USDA Facilities with repeat violations for all animal species

 

 

Now at Big Cat Rescue May 2 2014

Now at Big Cat Rescue May 2 2014

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Wildcat Walkabout 2014 05 01

 

 

Shere Khan Tiger is still mourning the loss of China Doll.  Jade & Armani Leopards pose for the camera.  Thuston and Lovey Bobcats cuddle up in their tree house.  Gilligan watches Skipper the Canada Lynx get caught and taken to the vet, a water moccasin threatens Gale and Pharaoh the white serval, JoJo the Caravel is up on this platform and Rusty and Sassy Caracals are snuggled in the bush.  Ginger Serval is on the prowl.

There are some great vocalizations by Running Bear and Little White Dove in this one, as well as some cats you don’t see very often due to their shy nature.

 

Great article about why it is bad to breed white tigers and Big Cat Rescue is quoted and linked.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/the-truth-about-white-tigers-and-why-their-breeding-needs-to-stop/

 

Shere Khan Tiger 2014 May 2

Today at Big Cat Rescue Dec 24 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Dec 24 2013

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Christmas Eve at Big Cat Rescue

 

 

Amur Leopard Video

 

 

This made my day!

 

Office Makeovers at Big Cat Rescue

 

Office-Makeover-2013-Chelsea

Chelsea’s new office

Office-Makeover-2013-Gale

Gale’s new office

Office-Makeover-2013-Jeff

Jeff and Tigger’s office

Office-Makeover-2013-Willow

Willow’s new office

When the floor began to give way in our office trailer, Scott Haller had to rip out the floors and start from scratch.  He found a wood floor product that is cheaper than vinyl and looks a lot nicer, so all of the offices and main conferencing areas and kitchen have new floors.  That inspired a lot of redecorating and spring cleaning and the images above are the results.

 

Bobcat Kitten Call!

 

Because we never want a bobcat to suffer needlessly, my phone number is easily accessible to anyone and everyone who thinks they have seen a Florida Panther or a Bobcat.  That means I am awakened at all hours of the day and night to take these calls.  This one woke me up yesterday morning; but thankfully they had photos to send, so I didn’t have to drive hours to find out if it was truly an orphaned bobcat kitten.

 

Bobcat-kitten-1-not

Probably not a bobcat, but check the next photo

Bobcat-kitten-2-not

Probably not a bobcat, but check the next photo

Bobcat-kitten-3-not

Probably not a bobcat, but check the next photo

Bobcat-kitten-4-not

Definitely not a bobcat, so I sent the caller the following image with an explanation of how to tell a bobcat from a domestic cat kitten.  ie:  Note the short tail and look for white patches on the backs of the ears.

 

Bobcat-kitten-5-YES

How amazing that we have such tools at our disposal that a person can trap a feral cat, text me a photo and I can text them right back with an image snagged from the Internet to demonstrate what to look for?  It’s easy to see why they make have thought these kittens were bobcats, because the spotting looks just like a bobcat.

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Dec 24 2013

 

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Oct 21 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Oct 21 2013

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Big Cat Walkabout Oct 2013

 

 

Come along with Carole Baskin as I show you our recently completed Kitten Cabana for foster kittens, see Vern, Chuck and Scott talk about finishing the Vacation Rotation “curtain” that makes the 2.5 enclosure cat safe for just about any species of exotic cat.

See Babbs planting some beautiful plants around the property with volunteers.

Watch Gale lead a project building a rehab cage for Fencer along w/ interns and volunteers. See Jen doing enrichment with some of the volunteers and a lot of the cats.

Then walk around to visit with Bobcats: Angelica, Angie, Lil White Dove, Little Dove, Levi, Precious, Mary Ann, Thurston, Lovey, Tommie Girl, Moses, Bailey, Andi, Sierra, Cherokee. Leopards: Cheetaro, Jade, Armani, Jumanji, Simba and Nyla. Canada Lynx: Gilligan. Siberian Lynx: Natasha. Caracal: Rusty. Hybrids: JoJo and King Tut. Geoffroy Cat: Nico takes a long bath. Ocelots: Amazing Grace and Nirvana. Tigers: Zabu and TJ. Cougars: Cody, Tobi and Aspen Echo. Lion: Cameron. Sand Cat: Canyon. Servals: Ginger, Nala, Frosty, Kalihari, Zouletta and Zimba… and a whole lot more.

 

AnimalLoverDreamVacationAmyMarioGodwin

Animal Lovers Dream Vacation Winners Amy and Mario Godwin

Rose

Rose

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hear big cats

 

ROSE

Female Caracal

DOB 3/28/97 – 7/31/13

Rose is such a friendly caracal that she was featured in Jack Hanna’s show “Wild Adventures” for a demonstration of photo tour techniques.

Guests love looking at the characteristic black tufted ears of this little caracal.

Rose, like many other wild cats that were raised to become pets, did not learn proper grooming techniques from her mother when she was young.  This explains the matted sections of fur she so often has on her coat.

 

 

On July 13, 2013 it was noted by keepers that Rose had not finished her meal.  Over the next three weeks her appetite seemed sporadic, so keepers began cutting up her food and offering it on a stick.  When that stopped working she was taken in for blood work on July 31, 2013.

Her test results read off the charts for kidney failure and she had ulcers in our mouth and on her tongue. She was in the final stages of the renal failure and so while she was under sedation we made the decision to euthanize her.

We have had 7 caracals in the past, the oldest of which was 17 years old when she passed away.  Rose was 16 years old.