Purr-sonality

Purr-sonality

hear big catsPurr-sonality

Female Serval
DOB 1/1/95

As with many of the servals we have at Big Cat Rescue, PURRsonality seems to enjoy the daily attention she gets from her volunteer keepers. She eagerly plays with any enrichment items that are given to her to break up the monotony of life in captivity. She can be seen batting spice bags around and rubbing and rubbing them until the scent has completely disappeared.

As with most of our servals, this is the type of playful, non-threatening behavior you’ll see from them during the daytime. But, feeding time is a whole different story. The minute food is involved; these diminutive little cats become dangerous carnivores. PURRsonality is no exception.

Though servals are often touted as great exotic pets, nothing could be farther from the truth. Ask many of our keepers and they will all say the same thing: they’d much prefer feeding the larger tigers than these little wildcats like PURRsonality. Looks can be very deceiving!

Sponsor PurrSonality http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

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See More About PurrSonality:

See a video of PurrSonality shredding toilet paper – https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=agVnhrFD3ww

Most of our servals were rescued from people who got them as pets and were not prepared for the fact that male or female, altered or not, they all spray buckets of urine when they become adults. Some were being sold at auction where taxidermists would buy them and club them to death in the parking lot, but a few were born here in the early days when we were ignorant of the truth and were being told by the breeders and dealers that these cats should be bred for “conservation.” Once we learned that there are NO captive breeding programs that actually contribute to conservation in the wild we began neutering and spaying our cats in the mid 1990’s.  Knowing what we do about the intelligence and magnificence of these creatures we do not believe that exotic cats should be bred for lives in cages. Read more about our Evolution of Thought HERE

Little Dove

Little Dove

hear big catsLittle Dove

Female Bobcat

DOB   5/12/93

Rescued 5/27/93

 

Little Dove came with the original group of 56 who were rescued from a fur farm by Big Cat Rescue. She is a “Blue” Bobcat and turns silver in the winter. Although she was raised along side Little Feather and Raindance, two of our friendliest Bobcats, she has never been very trusting of humans and remains quite shy.

She now has a 2400 square foot Cat-A-Tat all to herself. When she was younger one of the cats she lived with mistakenly bit her eye while playing. It has healed completely and her vision is fine, however her eye is two colors, divided directly down the center, one side is golden and the other side is dark brown.

Sponsor Little Dove http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most of our bobcats were rescues from fur farms.  The deal Our Co-Founder made with the three fur farms we discovered in the U.S. was that he would pay top dollar for every cat and kitten they had as long as the fur farmer would agree to never buy and breed cats again for slaughter.  It came at a time that the public outcry was against the fur industry.  Many of these animals were purchased at auctions where the uncaring owners were dumping the cats with no concern about their welfare.  There is much controversy over whether we did the right thing by paying the ransom for these cats.  We still accept many unwanted cats each year, but do not pay for them and typically require that their owner surrender their license, in an attempt to keep people from just trading in their cats each year for a newer, cuter model.  We have to turn away more than 100 cats each year due to a lack of space and funds and the lack of regulation of the exotic pet trade. Read more about our Evolution of Thought HERE

 

Thurston

Thurston

hear big catsThurston AKA Mr. Howell

Male bobcat
Appx. 1/1/2008
Rescued 5/5/13

 

Mr. Howell is approximately five years old and was Lovey’s mate. He is declawed on all four paws and his left ear is folded over most likely the result of a past injury.

 

The two of them shared a cramped cage about 5’x13′. Their only shelter was a small plastic dog house that they managed to cram themselves into to escape the cold weather. The also had a tiny child’s play table to perch on.

Mr. Howell was not neutered and it is most likely that Lovey has not been spayed as their previous owner was a breeder. So the two of them were separated upon their arrival at Big Cat Rescue until they could be neutered and spayed.

Mr. Howell has a strange coat pattern and coloring, and had almost no fur on arrival, so it was believed that he may be some sort of bobcat wildcat hybrid, but now that he is healthy and fully furred he looks like a pure bobcat.

Mr. Howell loves his large rock cave and spends most of his time on top of this mountain observing his surroundings. Mr. Howell also loves spice bag enrichment! Big Cat Rescuers were in awe to see his reaction to the first enrichment he has probably ever received. Mr. Howell rolled around on the ground, rubbing his face on the bag, and pawing at the fun new toy.

 

Sponsor Mr Howell/Thurston Bobcat here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

 

Read more about the rescue and see photos and videos http://bigcatrescue.org/most-daring-rescue-ever/

See More About Thurston, AKA Mr. Howell

Thurston and Lovey Bobcats cuddle up in their tree house in this Wildcat Walkabout Video on May 1, 2014 – http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-may-2-2014/

 

 

 

Why tigers belong on the US-China agenda

Why tigers belong on the US-China agenda

President Barack Obama
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20500 USA
20th September 2015

Re: Why tigers belong on the U.S.-China agenda

Dear President Obama,

We, the undersigned, write to respectfully ask you to raise the issue of tiger trade with President Xi Jinping during his visit to the United States in September 2015.

We congratulate you on your leadership in the global fight against the poaching and trafficking crisis that is sweeping across Africa, threatening the survival of an estimated 420,000 elephants and 25,000 rhinos. Given that there are fewer than 3,200 wild tigers remaining across Asia, we appeal to you to ensure that they too urgently receive the highest levels of political and financial investment to end the
demand that is making them worth more dead than alive.

Tigers are killed for the skins, bones and organs

Tigers Killed for their bones, teeth, claws, penis and fur

One of the most critical threats to the survival of wild tigers is trade in their meat, skin and bones to satisfy demand driven by wealth, rather than health − for high-status food, drink, home décor and even investment assets. This demand is fuelled by a marked increase in tiger farms in China, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand, where tigers are intensively bred for trade in their parts and products. China alone claims to house more than 5,000 tigers on farms.

China is the main consumer market for tiger parts and products, and China’s State Forestry Administration has grown demand by supporting the expansion of tiger farms, allowing legal trade in skins from farmed tigers and approving farm wineries that make tiger-bone wine. Those actions have stimulated consumer interest in tiger products from all sources, undermining law enforcement, incentivizing poaching, and facilitating trafficking by organized criminal networks. Tiger-farm investors continue to push hard for full legalization of trade in tiger bones – the very trade China banned in 1993 because it threatened the survival of wild tigers. If trade were legalized, it would unleash a devastating demand that could quickly wipe out the last wild tigers, as the bones of wild tigers are far more valuable than those from captive tigers.

In order to ensure that tiger conservation remains a priority for the international community and to end tiger farming and tiger trade, we appeal to you to raise these issues with President Xi when he is your guest in Washington.

We also request the United States to take the following steps to compel China to take vital action:

1. Destroy all stockpiles of tiger parts and products and ensure deceased captive-bred tigers are incinerated so their parts cannot enter the black market;

2. Review the current certification of China under the Pelly Amendment to the Fisherman’s Act and urge China to phase out tiger farms, as per Decision 14.69 of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES);

3. Encourage introduction and adoption of the Big Cats and Public Safety Act, so that the keeping and breeding of the more than 5,000 captive tigers in the United States can be phased down to include only the small number needed by legitimate zoos and conservation breeding programs, to set an example of best practice;

4. Ask China and Laos to address the trafficking and sale of tiger parts and products, ivory, rhino horn and other endangered species in and through Laos by Chinese and Laotian nationals; and

5. Encourage adoption of legislation that increases the capacity of the United States to assist in the international effort to combat illegal wildlife trade, ensuring that tigers are emphasized, along with elephants, rhinos and other species.

Zero poaching of tigers can only be achieved when there is zero demand. Therefore, we ask you to continue your leadership in tackling illegal wildlife trade by seeking an end to tiger farming in Asia and the keeping of thousands of unregistered captive tigers in the United States.

We thank you for your time and consideration.

Most respectfully,

Carole Baskin, Big Cat Rescue
Adam Roberts, Born Free USA and Born Free Foundation
Debi Goenka, Conservation Action Trust
Kedar Gore, The Corbett Foundation
Sally Case, David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
Debbie Banks, Environmental Investigation Agency
Iris Ho, Humane Society International / The Humane Society of the United States
Sean Carnell, National Tigers For Tigers Coalition
Kishore Rithe, Satpuda Foundation
Simon Clinton, Save Wild Tigers
Harshwardhan Dhanwatey, Tiger Research and Conservation Trust
Vicky Flynn, TigerTime
Belinda Wright, Wildlife Protection Society of India
Biswajit Mohanty, Wildlife Society of Orissa

For Return Correspondence

By Email: debbiebanks@eia-international.org cc JudithMills@eia-international.org
By Post: Judith Mills c/o Environmental Investigation Agency, PO Box 53343, Washington, DC 20009 USA
By Telephone: Judith Mills, (202) 674 4588

Twitter handles that might be useful:

@POTUS
President Obama

@PressSec
Josh Earnest
White House Press Secretary

@SecretaryJewell
Sally Jewell, Secretary of the @Interior

@JohnKerry
Secretary of @StateDept

@WhiteHouseCEQ
Christina Goldfuss
Director, White House Office of Environmental Quality (CEQ)

@WhiteHouseOSTP
John Holdren
Assistant to the President for Science and Technology

Officials display the tiger skins seized in the northern Malaysian state of Kedah, near the Malaysia-Thai border

News on the talks between President Obama and China’s Xi

An international group of 13 wildlife experts, in a letter released Tuesday, is asking Obama to mention another topic — the threatened extinction of the 3,200 tigers that remain in the wild in Asia.

http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/2015/09/23/saving-the-few-wild-tigers-left-in-the-world-a-talking-point-for-obama-and-xi/

How many tigers are in the US

How many tigers are in the US

How Many Tigers are in the US?

I am frequently asked that question and the answer is that no one really knows.  Here’s why:

1.  There are two kinds of tiger owners in the U.S.  Pet owners and commercial owners.  To be a commercial owner you have to obtain a USDA license.  It is a one page form that asks for name, address and phone.  The cost is $30 (up to $750 depending on the number of animals you hold).  The Big Cat Q & A sheet that USDA compiled in 2004 suggests that you have to have some experience, but doesn’t require any documentation other than just saying you do.

2.  USDA did a census, once in 2004, where they asked USDA licensees how many tigers they held.  It was a voluntary survey, but based on what licensees admitted, there were roughly 5,000 tigers and about 200 of those were in AZA accredited zoos.  USDA doesn’t regulate pet owners so they were not surveyed.  Here is a list of the places we know have tigers, but no census has ever been done for lions, ligers, leopards, etc., and no private owners are listed here; just USDA facilities for the most part.  https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-rQZK2lBPese4Lyq4mcS_g75Zjc_l0YxYo5wD6f_IOo/edit?usp=sharing

 

Tiger Cub Found Wandering in California

Hemet CA Tiger Cub FoundAnd then there are stories like this one, that aired on Sept. 4, 2015 when a 3 month old tiger was found wandering the streets of Hemet, CA before being turned in to the Ramona Humane Society for care.

The cub was sent to Forever Wild Exotic Animal Sanctuary which is not accredited.  It is a mystery as to why the cub was not originally sent to one of the accredited facilities in California, but within a few days authorities did send the cub to Lions, Tigers and Bears in Alpine, CA which is accredited.

The cub is doing well despite obvious signs of being inbred, not well nourished and having been illegally declawed by his former owners.

 

 

Tigers in the U.S.

This video was posted in Oct 2010 and still the USFWS has not rescinded the generic tiger loophole, the USDA has still not banned contact with cubs, which we believe is a clear violation of the Animal Welfare Act, and Congress has still not banned the private possession of big cats. The Big Cat Coalition estimates there are 200 cubs a year bred for pay to play schemes, so five years of government inaction means more than 1000 big cats have been added to the crisis. This year has to be the year that we just don’t let up until all three take action to end the abuse.

Do your part at StopBigCatAbuse.com

 

One way to educate the public about how paying to play with cute little lion cubs and tiger cubs causes lives of misery and deprivation is to check out the Tiger Selfie App at TigerSelfieApp.com

Gilligan

Gilligan

hear big catsGilligan

Male Canada lynx
Appx. 1/1/07
Rescued 5/5/13

 

 

Gilligan’s age is unknown. He was purchased along with Skipper at an auction.

Gilligan had the tiniest cage measuring 5′ x 7′. It was also the dirtiest of all of the cages. The mud floor was not mud, but feces covered with a sprinkling of straw. It appeared as though Gilligan had tried to keep much of his waste confined to one area on top of his plastic dog house. He had perched atop the house day after day to defecate. The large pile of feces cascaded out of the side of his cage. It was clear that his cage had not been cleaned in several months.

Strewn about the cage were bits of meat, bones and fur. The dog house was too small for Gilligan to fit in and other than a small child’s play picnic table he had nowhere to escape the weather. He was forced to sleep in the open and surrounded by filth.

Because Gilligan’s cage was so small there was not enough room for Big Cat Rescuers to enter it with nets and a crate. So using wire that they had brought, they constructed a secondary enclosure to the door of his and inside placed the crate filled with soft dry hay. Gilligan was unsure about this new crate and despite its appeal of warmth and dryness he refused to enter it. He was left to contemplate entering the crate on his own while Big Cat Rescuers moved on to try and catch Skipper.

After Skipper was captured and carried to the Big Cat Rescue trailer, Gilligan had still refused to enter the crate. With no other options he was sedated with a blow dart. He quickly fell asleep and Dr. Justin did a full exam. After the exam he was gently placed in the crate and given the reversal agent for the tranquilizer.

Canada-Lynx-Gilligan_1709

When he awoke he was in a soft bed of hay being loaded into the trailer for his long trip back to Tampa.

Gilligan seems absolutely blissful in his new enclosure. In his first days he constantly sniffed all around soaking in the fresh air. He was also quite amazed with the wildlife that abounds at the sanctuary from cardinals, to lizards, to squirrels, he is very observant and intently watches as they flit and scurry about.

 

Sponsor Gilligan the Canada Lynx:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

 

Read more about the rescue and see photos and videos http://bigcatrescue.org/most-daring-rescue-ever/

See More About Gilligan:

Gilligan watches Skipper the Canada Lynx get caught and taken to the vet in this Wildcat Walkabout Video on May 1, 2014 – http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-may-2-2014/

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Gilligan Moves to an A/C Den

 

 

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2015 Gilligan Goes to the Vet