Nairobi

Nairobi

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hear big catsNairobi

Female Serval
DOB 4/1/93
Rescued  7/7/94

Nairobi was the mascot in a pet store window until she came to live at Big Cat Rescue July 7, 1994. The pet store owner was afraid that she would bite the small children who were always taunting her and she was right.

Nairobi spends her days lounging in her huge natural Cat.a.tat and can often be found draped over her favorite log without a care in the world.

 

 

 

Sponsor Nairobi http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

 

Apache

Apache

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Apache


Male Bobcat

Date of Birth: 5/5/95

Rescued  6/6/95

 

Apache came to Big Cat Rescue on June 6,1995. His previous owner saw him urinate on the carpet and decided that having a bobcat as a pet was not the best idea. Apache shares a large Cat.a.tat with Divinity.

 

He is one of the shyest in the bunch and is always leery of Keepers that approach his enclosure. He can be quickly won over however with a few tasty treats.

 

Apache looks very different from the other bobcats he lives with, his coat is very light and his eyes are blue-gray.

 

Sponsor Apache here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

Apache Loves Spice Bag

 

 

Apache When He Was a Kitten

 

 

See A Video of Apache Shredding Toilet Paper

 

 

Most of our bobcats were rescues from fur farms. The deal we made with the fur farms was that he would pay top dollar for every cat and kitten they had as long as the fur farmer would agree to never buy and breed cats again for slaughter. It came at a time that the public outcry was against the fur industry.

Some of our cats were purchased at auctions where the uncaring owners were dumping the cats with no concern about their welfare. We still accept many unwanted cats each year, but do not pay for them and now require that their owner surrender their license, in an attempt to keep people from just trading in their cats each year for a newer, cuter model.

The only way to end the abuse caused by the trade in wild cats is to pass a federal ban on the private possession of exotic cats.

Read more about our Evolution of Thought HERE

 

Kalahari

Kalahari

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hear big catsKalahari

Female Serval
DOB 9/16/96
Kalahari and Serengeti were pets that became unwanted after a divorce. Even people with the best intentions are not usually prepared for the life time commitment involved in owning an exotic cat. Kalahari is smaller than her sister Serengeti, and she has a chronic heart condition for which she must be given medication every day. Several of the cats at Big Cat Rescue have chronic conditions that require medications on an ongoing basis. Sometimes it can be quite difficult to get a wild cat to eat their medication. Kalahari’s keepers have found that she really likes whole prey like the day old chicks that are purchased frozen from a wholesaler. The chick is thawed out and then keepers put Kalahari’s pill down the chick’s throat. Kalahari gets really excited when she gets her special chick each day and quickly devours the treat unaware that she has just been medicated.

Sponsor Kalahari http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

Most of our servals were rescued from people who got them as pets and were not prepared for the fact that male or female, altered or not, they all spray buckets of urine when they become adults. Some were being sold at auction where taxidermists would buy them and club them to death in the parking lot, but a few were born here in the early days when we were ignorant of the truth and were being told by the breeders and dealers that these cats should be bred for “conservation.” Once we learned that there are NO captive breeding programs that actually contribute to conservation in the wild we began neutering and spaying our cats in the mid 1990’s.  Knowing what we do about the intelligence and magnificence of these creatures we do not believe that exotic cats should be bred for lives in cages. Read more about our Evolution of Thought

 

 

More about Kalahari

Kalahari and Serengetti are two sister servals who were born here back in 1996 and are now part of the reason that we no longer breed exotic cats.  At the time they were born we had two volunteers who were married to each other and who were a couple of the most dedicated volunteers we had at the time.  Their names were John and Penny and they were people we could always depend on for cleaning cages, feeding the cats, giving tours and doing outreach.  There didn’t want children and were wholly committed to helping protect exotic cats in any way they knew how.  I could not have asked for a more dynamic team.

When Kalahari and Serengetti were born, John and Penny made their pitch for why they would be be the best home possible for the two youngsters.  Their intention was to raise them with the kind of doting love and attention that two full time parents could give.  They would be so confidant and socialized that they would be comfortable going out to schools and civic events as “ambassadors” to teach people about why we need to protect wild cats and wild places.  Back then we didn’t realise that such “ambassadors” only cause people to want them as pets and are thus counter productive to the mission.

John would rave to us about all of the new tricks he had taught “their girls” and the rest of us kind of lived vicariously through his stories because he never actually brought “the girls” out for us to visit any more.  They never did, to my recollection, take “the girls” out into the public as intended, but I believed they were loved and cherished and that was good enough for me.  The two servals were raised until they were two or three years old;  about the time that they became mature and were no longer fun and handleable as pets.

Then John and Penny divorced.  They quit volunteering.  Neither felt the other was an appropriate parent to “the girls” so they asked if I would take them back.  Of course we did, but the only family they had ever known was John and Penny so they were not friendly to our keepers initially and didn’t enjoy visitors.  That is why they aren’t on the tour path and why a lot of you have probably never even met them.

Serval Sisters

Serval Sisters

Kalahari has a heart problem and has to be given two types of meds every day and has had to be tended to by our current vet care staff for the past 10-11 years.  The people who had vowed to be there for her and Serengetti aren’t there any more, but current Big Cat Rescuers are.  Their story is just one of hundreds that we tell about why even the smaller exotic cats never work out as pets.

No one had more time invested in caring for servals that John and Penny did at the time of their adoption.  They had seen lots of other servals go from being cute and cuddly kittens who grew up into spitting, hissing servals.  They thought they were different.  They thought they could do it better and I believed it too. I really thought the love and attention they would give these two would be far above what I could offer here, with volunteers who come and go, and I thought that they would have a forever home.

There were a lot of cats here, mostly those who were rescued from fur farms, some who were born here, that I put into what I thought were loving and forever homes, but almost all of those cats have come home to us.  It is the family that makes up Big Cat Rescue who turn out to be the safety net for these cats and for those we rescue.  As I watch huge sanctuaries get in over their heads and fail, I am ever reminded that we have to be smarter, more diligent and more accountable to each other than ever before if we are to be able to provide the forever home that is Big Cat Rescue.

Levi

Levi

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Levi

Male Bobcat
4/30/95 – 8/21/15

Levi came to live at Big Cat Rescue in 1995 along with 10 other Bobcats who were destined to be the next year’s fur coat harvest. Our Co-Founder had stumbled upon a facility in Omaha Nebraska that was raising Bobcats and Canadian Lynx for the purpose of harvesting the cats for their fur.

In order to spare these cats, all of them were purchased from the breeder and brought to live at the sanctuary.

Levi was neutered and lived with Tiger Lilly.

Aug 21, 2015  Levi Bobcat was euthanized by Dr. Boorstein tonight.  He was dramatically losing weight, suffered from high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism, and advanced kidney disease.  Upon necropsy it was found that his kidneys were completely shriveled.  This was not apparent in our previous blood work because the medications he was on masked the extent of his kidney failure.  He was becoming increasingly anemic and dehydrated, despite being given sub q fluids repeated and injections to both stimulate his appetite and reduce his nausea.  Tonight Levi made it clear that he was ready to go, so Jamie and Dr. Justin helped ease him over to the other side.  He was twenty.  Read his tributes here:  https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/levi-bobcat

Levi Bobcat When He Was a Kitten

 

 

 

 

Sponsor Levi Bobcat here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

Levi Bobcat Gets Netted

 

 

Levi Bobcat has been treated for kidney disease for a year or more, and lately his keepers say he’s acting weird.  Levi will usually launch himself aggressively at keepers and is always quick to come for food, treats and even his meds, because he wants to let you know that he’s the boss.  We decided to draw some blood and urine and see how his disease is progressing and if there is anything we can do to give him relief.

We tried catching him in his lockout, but that didn’t work, so Plan B is to net him, which no one wants to do because he is so scary.

Desiree

Desiree

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hear big catsDesiree

Female Serval
DOB unknown
Rescued  10/11/2009

 

Serval Rescue! An African Serval was limping along in the Arizona desert until she collapsed alongside a road.

 

She had almost completely given up the will to live. She was probably a pet or perhaps used in the hybrid breeding scheme that has become all the rage where Servals are bred to domestic house cats to produce Savannah Cat hybrids. The domestic cats are often killed in the process. The kittens sell for thousands of dollars, but when they mature they typically spray and bite and make awful pets. The hybrids are usually discarded by the time they are two or three years old.

 

This Serval was obviously abandoned and was placed by authorities at the Tucson Wildlife Center, a non-profit sanctuary dedicated to native wildlife. Lisa Bates-Lininger the founding president of the Tucson Wildlife Center said, “She was dehydrated and tired and just ready to give up. She may have died last night, but luckily we got her in. We got her emergency treatment, fluids for shock, and she’s also missing a rear leg.”

 

Despite 18 media posts including TV news in Tucson and a post on Craig’s list looking for the owner no one admits to having abandoned this Serval to die in the desert.  Thanks to some very generous supporters the serval was flown to her new permanent home at Big Cat Rescue where she is recovering well.  Servals can live into their late teens and proper care is thousands of dollars each year. Her new 1,200 square foot Cat-a-tat had to be specially modified to accommodate her three legged hopping. It seems that she only recently lost her leg as she has a very difficult time keeping her balance.  We are writing vets in the Tucson area to find out if any of them know what tragedy caused her to lose a limb and to see if there is any way to prosecute those who exposed her to such danger.

 

Sponsor Desiree http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

 

Arizona

Arizona

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hear big catsArizona

Female Serval
DOB 4/1/89 – 5/15/2015
Rescued  6/17/97

 

Arizona arrived at Big Cat Rescue 6/17/97 and is thought to be quite old.

She is fully clawed and very aggressive at feeding time.

Arizona loves enrichment time, her favorite thing is a food puzzle made out of a cardboard tube stuffed with treats and feathers.

Other than when she is being fed Arizona keeps to her self hidden in the thick foliage provided by several palmetto bushes.

Arizona is the oldest serval living at Big Cat Rescue and probably in the world.

Read tributes to Arizona Serval here:  https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/arizona-serval