Nala Serval

Nala Serval

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hear big catsNala

Female Serval
DOB appx 1/1/10
Rescued 1/5/13

Nala-Serval_562550340569609007_o

A man called on Dec. 13 and I called him back the same day and told him we would take his father’s serval if he would contract to never own another exotic cat.

On the first call he said that his dad was in the hospital and not expected to survive. I told him all of the rules for us taking the cat and he agreed, but then I didn’t hear from him for 20 days.

Meanwhile, on Dec 18 we were asked by USDA to take 2 bobcats from a Donna White, but I never have been able to connect with her. Also, on Jan 1, one of our supporters asked us to rescue a rehab bobcat in CA. We contacted the rehabber there and offered to assist, but they had been misquoted in the press and the bobcat was doing fine.

On Jan 2 he called and said his dad had died and that he wanted us to take Nala. I told he we would need a health certificate and would have to ask the FWC for an import permit, which can take 2 weeks.

Nala ServalOn Jan 3 his vet called and asked what we needed him to do as far as a health certificate because no one could handle her. I told him that the vet only has to look at the cat and say it is breathing for the purpose of the certificate. He said his wife was a vet who had worked at Jeff Kozlowski’s big cat place in WI and that he had done some exotic cat work, but that he was very happy he didn’t have to handle her. He said that he knew her vaccines were not up to date; that he thought she was declawed and thought she might have been spayed. Jason faxed me the health certificate that night and the next morning I applied to the FWC for the import permit.

On Jan 4 the son called and asked me, again, what airline to try and I told him Delta might do it, but that it was hit or miss with them. He asked if they would come get her and I assured him they would not and that he would have to catch her, put her in a dog kennel and then at the airport he’d have to show the health certificate and even then they might not take her. I told him a couple hours in the air would be a lot less stress for her than riding all day in the back of a van, but that if the airline wouldn’t accept her, we would come get her. Much to my surprise the FWC issued the import permit the same day and faxed it to me.

I emailed the son and told him the import permit had arrived. He called me late that night and said that Nala had cost him a lot more already than he thought she would to send and that he was going to ask his brother to help pay her 360.00 airfare.

On Jan 5 the son sent an email saying Nala was “paradise bound”, was in the air and would be here by 3PM. We picked her and released her into her newly renovated Cat-a-tat and video will follow soon.

 

Sponsor Nala http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

 

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Nala Serval Airport Nala_03

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More About Nala

** January 2013 Advocat Newsletter – Nala Arrives – Nala arrived on Sunday, January 5th at Tampa International Airport.  She was met at the cargo warehouse by BCR CEO Carole Baskin, President Jamie Veronica, and volunteer veterinarian Dr. Justin Boorstein.  After a short car ride she was exploring her 2,000 square foot enclosure;  her new home at Big Cat Rescue. http://bigcatrescue.org/advocat-2013-01/

** Today at Big Cat Rescue February 8, 2013 – See several photos including some of Nala. http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-feb-8-2013/

** Walk About Video from March 9, 2014 – See a cute clip of Nala Serval chasing her tail in front of a private tour. http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-march-9-2014/

** Big Cat Walkabout Oct 2013 Video has several of the cats in it as well as, Nala.  http://bigcatrescue.org/today-big-cat-rescue-oct-21-2013/

** January 15, 2013 – What is a typical day at Big Cat Rescue like? http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-jan-15-2013/

 

 

Narla

Narla

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Narla

NarlaCougarAngelFemale Cougar
DOB 1/1/97 – 2/3/16
Rescued 1/8/2010

 

Rescue of Narla the Cougar:

This is a letter from someone who knew the Loppi’s.  This person below, wanted us to know that Rob was well intended and I post it here as an example of how even the best intentions usually end up bad for the exotic animal.

According to a number of emails I got after the fact, Rob’s wife was looking to euthanize the cat, but Rob’s friends, family and the media were on her case and she couldn’t  do it without looking like a monster when we were standing by, ready to take her. It is only because of supporters, like you, that we can help cats like Narla in their greatest moment of need.

You can read tributes to Narla here:  https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/narla-cougar

 

 

Eye Specialist Sees Narla Cougar

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

Narla has been pretty much blind since she arrived, but Dr. Miller came out to check on her eyes again today.

 

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

Dr. Liz Wynn has many friends in the veterinary community and calls in specialists when it is warranted.

 

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

Previous exams have shown Narla Cougar to have eye ulcerations that have been treated with eye drops.

 

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

This exam reveals that the back side of her eyes are degenerating and Dr. Miller suspects it was from her first 14 years of insufficient nutrition before coming to Big Cat Rescue.

 

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

Dr. Tammy Miller says Narla is one of her favorite patients.

 

Dr. Tammy Miller and Dr. Liz Wynn check out Narla Cougar

When big cats are pulled from their mothers to be hand reared as pets, like Narla had been, they never get a sufficient diet on kitten or puppy milk replacer. This causes a life time of debilitation.

More from Narla’s Rescue:

Dear Big Cat Rescue:

 

I am very happy that you are giving Narla a new home. Since her owner, Rob Loppi’s, death last May, I can’t tell you how many people worried and wondered what would become of Narla.  My reason for writing to you is not just to thank you for taking care of Narla, but because I wanted to give you some background information.  I feel it is important for you to know how Narla came to Rhode Island in the first place.  Since the story of Narla’s rescue broke, I have read and heard many negative comments about Rob Loppi having this animal in the first place. There have been many comments in the newspapers that are just not accurate. Since Rob is no longer with us, and can’t defend himself, I would like the real story known. He didn’t just wake up one morning and decide on a whim that it would be great to have a cougar.  I was there, and would like the true story to be told.

 

Rob got Narla when she was a baby, not 5 months old as was inaccurately reported.  She was no bigger than a puppy, still had her baby fuzz and spots and was still being bottle fed.  She was obtained by a person that Rob knew casually.  This friend purchased her from a breeder in Virginia, thinking that it would be cool to have a mountain lion as a pet.  When he got her home, his fiancé, correctly, would not allow him to keep her, so he brought her to Rob. People were always bringing unwanted animals to Rob…cats, dogs, goats, pigs…whatever.

 

Initially, Rob did not want to take her, but he was afraid that if he refused she would end up in a bad situation.  Rob took her in and set about trying to find her a home.  Since she was an illegal exotic at that point, this was not an easy task.  He contacted the Dept. of Environmental Management in RI anonymously and was informed that they would confiscate the cat and most likely she would be destroyed – unbelievable, but true.  They said that it was not their policy to find homes for dangerous animals, just to protect the environment and maintain public safety.  He then contacted Roger Williams Zoo and asked them to take her – they refused because a). they do not take animals from private parties, only other zoos, and b). she came from a breeder and was bottle fed.  They said that other cats would not take to her and would possibly harm or kill her.  After many more such calls…you get the picture.  No one would help.  You should also keep in mind that this time period was before the internet was a household item, so trying to get information was much more difficult.

 

Feeling like he had no other options, he contacted the breeder in Virginia and asked to bring her back.  He drove her to Virginia and was appalled at the conditions.  Virginia’s laws on exotics are (or, at that time, were) very lenient and this guy would obviously sell to anyone as long as the price was right.  He just couldn’t leave her there.  He knew that she would be re-sold and probably end up in a traveling carnival or roadside “zoo” with her teeth filed down, being whipped into submission, living in deplorable conditions and spending most of her life in a crate.  He knew that he could do better by her, so he made the decision that he would have to keep her to make sure that she was cared for and safe.  Unfortunately, this would mean having her declawed for safety.  This wasn’t something he wanted to do, but he did it in an effort to try to maintain her.

 

He then set about getting Narla legal.  Since he already knew DEM’s position, he went to the Federal level.  USDA told him what he needed to do in order to get a license to keep an exotic (again, at that time, their rules were much less stringent).  He built the double cage (making it bigger and stronger than the required size and pipe diameter) with natural materials and different levels and perches for climbing, set up an account with a chicken farm so he could feed her properly, contacted a veterinarian who had the qualifications to provide medical care for Narla and set about learning everything he needed to know about the care and husbandry of mountain lions.  USDA inspected and found him to be a suitable owner and he was granted a license.  Once he had the USDA license in hand, DEM could not confiscate and destroy her, so he was then able to begin application for a RI license.  He hired an attorney and, after getting through all the paperwork and red tape, he received the license. RI DEM inspected regularly, including random and surprise visits, always finding Narla in good care and condition.

 

Rob NEVER tried to domesticate Narla.  He was very well aware that she was a wild animal.  While he did have an amazing connection with her, she was always treated as a mountain lion, not as a house cat, which has been implied in the media.  Narla has been characterized as “gentle and affectionate” and she was…with Rob.  This, as you know, is the case with big cats…they bond to one person and can be jealous and aggressive with others.  Visitors and friends were not allowed to just hang out in the living room with her.  She didn’t just wander freely around the house or yard.  Even Rob’s closest friends were not allowed direct contact.  This wasn’t Siegfried and Roy.  She is a predator and certainly capable of attacking and killing.  He knew that, and safety was always the first priority, not just our safety, but Narla’s too. People can be foolish and cruel, which is why Rob didn’t want the general public to know about her.  That was another reason for the double cage, not just to keep Narla in, but to keep people out.  There was only one other person, Rob’s friend Mike, who was allowed to care for Narla and did so during Rob’s illness.  Mike was trained in Narla’s care and feeding and did a great job.  Rob was so grateful to Mike.  With all he was going through, many rounds of chemotherapy treatments, numerous infections and finally a bone marrow transplant, at least he knew Narla was in good hands.

 

Rob didn’t use Narla as a gimmick or sideshow attraction.  Sure, people knew about her and would be curious to see her, but he never profited from her.  He allowed “ordinary” people to come to see her in her cage, but never allowed media attention.  He wouldn’t give interviews, allow media photos or any exploitation of her in any way.  He didn’t want to glorify having a big cat in his yard.  He didn’t want people to think that it is ok to try to keep a mountain lion as a pet.  Rob knew that keeping her was not an ideal situation, but at that time, he felt he was doing what was best for her.  When he made the decision to keep Narla, he took on a huge financial burden…food, supplements, veterinary care, etc. and he could have very easily used this beautiful animal as a way to make money, but that was never his way.  He just wanted to give her the best life he could and keep her safe.

 

So, now you know Narla’s story.  I felt that it was important for you to know that, while she may have been raised in someone’s backyard, she wasn’t just a passing fancy, she wasn’t a “pet“ in the conventional sense of the word.  She was a lifelong responsibility taken on by a guy who made a hard decision based on limited options.  Had she not been born to a breeder in Virginia who sells these animals to anyone with enough money to buy them, without any thought or concern for where they will live or how they will be treated, she would not have been in Rhode Island.  If Rob hadn’t “rescued” her first, Big Cat Rescue may have found Narla in a horrible situation, if she had survived at all.

 

Thank you again for all that you do for these animals and, especially for Narla.  She is always loved and surely missed.

 

Sincerely,

 

Julie A. Aldrich

 

Sassyfrass Cougar

Sassyfrass Cougar

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Male Cougar
DOB  1/1/1998
Rescued  11/17/2010

 

Sponsor Sassyfrass http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Sassyfrass the Mountain Lion

 

If only they could speak to us in a language that we understand.  Then we might know the horrors they have survived and be more inclined to protect others from enduring their fate.

I’ll share with you what I do know and hope that will inspire you to help these cougars and to do all you can to end the trade in exotic cats.

Back in the 90s, farmers Al and Kathy Abell, decided to start a breeding facility called Cougar Bluff Enterprises. They set up cages in their back yard in Elizabethtown, IL and filled them with a couple of cougars (Freddy & Sassy) a lion cub named Simba, some wolves and wolf hybrids. It was their plan to breed and sell and be surrounded by the kinds of wild animals they loved. The more they saw of what breeders and dealers were doing to animals, like the former owner who had beaten Sassy with a shovel, the more they realized that there was just no good reason to be breeding and selling exotics, so they never bred the big cats.

Having raised Simba the lion from a cub, they may have been complacent about the dangers of such interactions. Simba wasn’t even full grown before killing Al Abel. On that tragic day, Feb. 12, 2004 Kathy Abel came home to find the lion on the front porch of their home, her dog dead in the yard and no sign of her husband.

Sheriff’s deputies arrived on the scene as dark was closing in and the lion was on the edge of the 277,000 ac Shawnee National Forest. Kathy could not locate darts for her dart gun and the deputies were ordered to shoot Simba the lion rather than risk him killing someone in the park. It wasn’t until after Simba, body riddled by bullets, lay dying that Kathy discovered her husband dead on the floor of Simba’s cage. It had only taken one bite to the leg to cause him to bleed to death.

Fast forward six years and on Nov. 8, 2010 Chris Poole, of Big Cat Rescue came across a Facebook post saying that Kathy Abell had killed herself and left two cougars and an array of other domestic pets and farm animals with no one for miles around to care for them. We responded right away that we would come get the two cougars, Freddy and Sassy. It took a long 9 days to get the health certificate and import permit and to wait for Kathy’s family to bury her before we would be allowed to arrive on the scene. Meanwhile, Robin Parks, Field Volunteer for the Mountain Lion Foundation had coordinated with Kathy’s sister Kimberly Rapp and a local rehabber, Bev Shofstall to insure that the cats were being fed and cared for.

Sassy the Mountain LionBig Cat Rescuers; President, Jamie Veronica Murdock, Operations Manager, Gale Ingham and Chris Poole hit the road on Nov. 17th driving straight through the night to Cave In Rock, IL which was the nearest lodge to the cougars. While en-route, Bev the rehabber emailed asking us to hurry as she wasn’t sure Freddy, the 14 year old and very frail cougar, could make it another day. Rescuers made the trip in record time but arrived well after dark. They coordinated with Kimberly Rapp to pick up the cats at first light on the morning of the 18th.

This is where YOU come in.

These cats have witnessed things that no one should ever have to see. It is only through your help that we can make sure their last years are the best years of their lives. Your voice in letters to your lawmakers asking for a ban on the private possession of big cats, at CatLaws.com is what will stop the future breeding, trading and discarding of big cats that led to this sad situation. Your donations are what make it possible for us to commit to an emergency rescue like this.

 

To donate visit: http://bigcatrescue.org/donate

For PayPal send to CustomerService@BigCatRescue.org

 

 

Cougar Rescue Video

 

 

Time Line of a Mountain Lion Rescue

 

On Nov. 8, 2010 Big Cat Rescue videographer, Chris Poole came across this post on Facebook:

 

Mr. Robin Parks
Special Agent, NCIS (Ret)
Field Volunteer, Mountain Lion Foundation (MLF)
San Diego, California

Images courtesy of Bev Shofstall

 

This is a long shot, but….Late last night I received word that an acquaintance of mine (Kathy Abell) in southern Illinois apparently killed herself sometime last Thursday (11/4/2010). In addition to a number of pets and farm animals, she left behind two elderly cougars.I have known these cats for nearly 10 years. This is the weekend and I’ve been unable to contact any key player out there, but I did notify the USDA inspector from Indiana who occasionally monitors the cats. Cougar RescueA  family member told me that someone from the Illinois Dept of Natural Resources is trying to care for the cats, but I’ve not yet confirmed this. The sheriff’s office that responded to the scene has been less than helpful as the matter of the care and disposition of the cats is not their concern. I’ll be working the phones hot & heavy tomorrow morning.The USDA inspector has already suggested the cats may have to be put down, and I fully realize there just may not be any other solution. Both cats are fragile and stress easily, and one is terrified of men as he was beaten with a shovel by a man when he was a cub. I’m hoping that I will be given at least a few days to place these cats before someone makes a decision to shoot them.Do any of you know any accredited facility in Illinois or elsewhere in the Midwest that might be able to assume custody???Do any of you know any person in that area who might be able to lend some personal expertise as to the feeding and care of the animals. I’m sure the DNR person, will do her best, but won’t have a clue.  Any other ideas??For whatever good it will do, I may be headed out there in the next few days to see if I can help, even if it’s only to ensure the cats are put down humanely. I may know more about the cats than any one else.

 

Nov. 8:  I called Robin Parks and told him we could provide permanent care for the cougars and could come pick them up.

 

Robin said Bev Shofstall was going out to check on the cats and that she should be the main contact person for those coming in.  Bev is a private citizen, not a DNR employee, who operates the Free Again Wildlife Rehab center in Carterville, Illinois. Shofstall has a cougar at her facility and has the basic skills and knowledge to keep the lid on this matter until some better solution can be reached.

 

Robin described the cats as:

 

Freddy the cougar1. Freddy, male, maybe 160 lbs, about 14 yrs old, declawed, the usual joint and arthritis stuff but not bad for his age, easily stressed by noise and strangers, easily managed by the threat of spraying him with a garden hose at one end while offering chicken at the other. He is probably already very stressed by what has happened.

 

2. Sassy, male, maybe 12, maybe 120 lbs, afraid of men as a result of a son-of-a-bitch beating him with a shovel handle when he was a cub, not bad with women, no real physical probs that I know of.

 

Nov. 9: Robin reported, “Freddy, the older cat, is not eating so well and is obviously grieved about Kathie not being there. He tends to lose weight kinda quickly when he does this, but usually bounces back ok.”  He went on to say, “Kathie’s will passed nearly everything to a son, Neil Evans, by a earlier relationship, and that son (in Indiana or MI @ obit) has passed authority to Kimberly Rapp (sister) to handle all matters regarding property and animals and whatever.  I once helped transfer Freddie from one enclosure to another. He didn’t want to cooperate, but gave in when the garden hose came out. It was done without any tranq’ing. Sassy might be a bit more problematic, but my feeling is no darting will be needed with him either. Can’t recall if I mentioned it earlier but…Freddie is declawed, but I think Sassy is still packin’. Both have plenty of teeth.”

 

The address for the site in Hardin County where the animals are is listed as Rt 2, Elizabethtown, Illinois, near Cave-in-Rock. The site is very close to a tourist area known as “The Garden of the Gods” in Karbers Ridge, Illinois, and is also a mile from a very small camp ground area called “Camp Cadiz”.

 

Nov. 9Just so you know what we are up against when we try to rescue a big cat.  The exploiters would rather the cats die or go to some backyard jail cell than see us make case after case for why the private possession of these cats should be banned.  Robin said 6 people he didn’t know called him with comments that characterized us as “the anti-Christ”, “pagan sacrifices”, “gold digging slut”, and said “her facilities are pig sties”, better the cats be dead than with her, she’s only a “hoarder”, she’s only trying to advance her own personal agenda at the expense of the others trying to help, and worse. He also said he knew BS when he smelled it.

 

Sassy the cougar's penNov. 10: Robin reports: “Bev Shofstall did visit the cats yesterday.  Things are as good as can be expected, but Freddy is not eating, and it’s taking a toll. He appears a bit weaker and all the stress has probably made worse whatever joint/bone/age problems he has. I have seen him go thru this before, so we shouldn’t write him off just yet, but for SURE he’ll need some TLC and handling with kid gloves. Bev brought some very fresh venison for him, but he showed no interest. She will visit the cats again tomorrow (Thursday, the day of the memorial service).  Sassy, on the other hand, appears to be doing ok, still has a good appetite, and his usual cranky disposition. He just may not be a problem to transfer at all.”

 

Nov. 1: Kathy G. Abell, age 56, died at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 5, 2010, at her residence and was cremated and memorialized today.

 

Nov. 12, 2010 Robin let me know that Ann Marie Houser took over from Elizabeth Taylor as the USDA agent involved.  He said Bev had returned to visit the cats the day before and that “I talked with Bev Shofstall a few minutes ago. She was at the site yesterday, and Freddy seems to be doing a bit better. He’s eaten some venison and other goodies and appears a bit more alive. He has issues, but it’s likely he’s mostly been reacting to the loss of his Kathie and all the strangers being around. Sassy, the other cat, seems to be doing fine.”

 

I told Kimberly Rapp I would need her to fax me a health certificate for the cats so I could apply for a FL import permit.

 

Nov. 13:  A vet came out to inspect the cats for transport and Kimberly faxed it to me.  I filled out the FWC permit application, attached the health certificate and faxed to the Florida Wildlife Commission.  Our “friend” at the FWC, Capt. John West has retired, so I was worried about how long the permit would take as they claim to be running two weeks behind on them.

 

Nov. 15: I called the FWC to see if they got my fax over the weekend and they had, but complained that Precious was on vacation and that Capt. Linda Harrison was overloaded with permit applications.  I explained the dire situation again, as I had in the application, and asked that they give Freddy and Sassy priority.  I then contacted Capt. Harrison and asked her to sort through the pile to find our application.

 

I asked Kimberly Rapp if she wanted us to pay for Great Dane carriers locally that she could put in the cages for the cats to get used to, but she said there was no way to get them through the gates.

 

Nov. 16: The FWC issued our import permit.  I let Kimberly Rapp and Robin Parks know that we were awaiting Kimberly’s directive on when we should arrive.  We sat on pins and needle all day waiting for a response.  Finally around 9pm Kimberly called and asked if we could be there the day after.  She and Bev had gone to the cats and because the weather had been in the 20s and 30s.  All the cats had for shelter was a dog-loo on a hard floor so she had wanted to put a rug in for Freddy, but he wouldn’t have it, so she removed it.  They had been working in the freezing rain and she had contacted us as soon as she got in.

 

I called Jamie and let her know that Kimberly was taking Thursday off to be there and wanted our crew to be there before noon.  That meant our crew would have to leave first thing Wed. the morning of the 17th.  Jamie contacted Chris and Gale and let them know to pack their bags and bring their lunch.

 

Nov. 17: By 7am the Big Cat Rescuers were on their way to Cave In Rock, IL.  They took turns driving and sleeping and by 6pm they were in Nashville and getting sandwiches to eat on the road.  One tire didn’t look too good, but everything else was going fine and they hoped to be at the lodge by midnight.

 

Bev emailed me during the day asking when we would be coming.  It seems that neither Kimberly, nor Robin told her we were already on the way.  She said that she thought Freddy was much closer to death than previously thought.  She was worried that he wouldn’t make it another night.

 

backbones of cougarDuring the course of the day I learned that Kathy Abell was not the first person to die at this facility.  Robin confided, “I first met Kathie and her husband Al sometime in the late 90?s when her place (a very small place, barely even a mom & pop operation) was called Cougar Bluff Enterprises. They had a wolf or two, some hybrids or two, a cougar or two, and (a bit later I think) one huge Barbary lion (just huge, every bit as big as a Siberian). I liked the cats, know how things were in Hardin County, and offered to work at their place doing anything they needed anytime I was back there (my parents live about 30 miles from there and I came back 2x/year). In all the years I knew them, no one before or since, has ever offered to volunteer for them.

 

Now…no doubt about it, at the time I first met them, their plan was to breed the wolves (not so much the cats, as I recall) and sell them. They pretty much saw this as a business.

 

However, also about the time I met them, they started going through a change of philosophy. Over a couple of years, they quickly learned how many neglected animals there are out there in that world, how badly they often get treated, and how so much of this terrible situation was fueled by the breeders. So….they dropped their plans and converted to the “non breeder” point of view. They never bred any animal.

 

Almost without exception, the cats they got were “throw away’s” or badly neglected animals that came from breeders or other mom & pop places. Sassy was one of those, and had been badly abused by it’s owner. The Barbary was also one of these. It’s a long story, but some butthead somewhere got hold of the lion with he was very young, kept it in the garage for about 3 weeks until the cat got big enough to eat people, and then they basically told Al & Kathie they would kill the lion if they didn’t take it from them. So, they did….and got just waaaay over their heads.

 

It was that lion, somewhere around 2003 (it was 2004) that ended up killing Al. It’s a long story and there’s some fine points that are still not known, but Al apparently went into the cage ALONE to do some cleaning, and apparently didn’t secure the outer perimeter lock. The cat maybe knocked thru a inner perimeter lock, bit Al just one on the leg, then strolled out of the compound. Again, long story, but Al bled out before anybody got there several hours later. Hardin County cops came and killed the lion, who by that time was waiting at the porch for Kathie to get home. Sad.

 

So….that’s kinda the story here. This thing did indeed start out as a “breeding” story, but they did totally convert their thinking many years before the sad recent events. In some respects, it’s a redemption story.”

 

These were the two news articles that ran about the death of Al Abell in 2004

 

Man killed by pet African lion

 

Associated Press  02/13/2004

 

ELIZABETHTOWN, Ill. (AP) — A Hardin County man who kept exotic animals was apparently attacked and killed Thursday by a pet African lion, authorities said.

 

Al Abell was apparently changing the bedding of the lion’s pen when he was attacked, Sheriff Carl Cox told The Paducah Sun.

 

According to Cox, Abell’s wife returned to the couple’s home near Elizabethtown in southeastern Illinois shortly before 6 p.m., saw the lion out of its pen and called the sheriff’s office. Deputies killed the lion and then discovered Abell lying nearby, according to the newspaper.

 

Abell was taken to Hardin County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 8:37 p.m., Coroner Roger Little said. An autopsy was scheduled for Friday, he said.

 

Cox said he visited the property about three years ago with state officials to make sure the Abells had the proper permits for the tigers, wolves and other exotic animals the couple kept on the property. He said he believed the lion that attacked Abell was a cub at the time of that visit.

 

Jeffrey Bonner, the president of the St. Louis Zoo, said Abell’s death illustrates just how dangerous wild animals can be.

 

“Even after centuries of breeding, you still can’t eradicate behavior that’s natural for them,” he said. “Lions hunt for their meat and kill it; it’s what they do. To think that an owner of any big cat, even after several years, can really domesticate them is, of course,  naive.”

 

Error with lion led to farmer’s death

 

By James Janega, Tribune staff reporter.

 

The two had raised Simba since he was a cub, and Al Abell must have felt comfortable around the almost full-grown male lion, Kathie Abell said.

 

Among the things the government oversees with animal exhibitors is how powerful animals like lions and other big cats are enclosed.

 

Big cats are expected to have two pens: A larger one with shelter in which to live and a smaller “shift pen” into which the animal can be moved while the larger enclosure is cleaned. The gate between the two must have a lock, and anyone who works around the animals must be trained in how to safely move the animals from one pen to the other. Typically, experts say, the maneuver is done by at least two people.

 

But on Feb. 12, 2004, Al Abell was alone when he moved the lion from its enclosure and into the shifting pen, and “did not lock [the] shift pen while cleaning shelter and surrounding area,” the animal care inspection report noted later.

 

“He never cleaned any large-field enclosure by himself till this tragic event occurred,” the report said.

 

Police reports, as well as interviews with Kathie Abell and southern Illinois law enforcement officials shortly after Al Abell died revealed the tense twilight standoff that day between nervous police officers and an agitated lion on the edge of Shawnee National Forest’s 277,000 acres.

 

It took a half-hour for police officers to fly up the gravel road to the farm after Kathie Abell’s call.

 

In that time, a frantic Kathie Abell had found a tranquilizer gun, but not the darts.
When Hardin County sheriff’s deputies arrived, she knew her dog had been killed, but couldn’t find her husband.

 

Freddy cougar penThe Abells’ menagerie of wildcats, lorded over by a limping 8-year-old cougar named Freddy, paced and cowered in their pens. The wolves and several huskies cried from cages at the tree line below.

 

Standing in the Abells’ fenced yard with his back to Freddy’s cage, Hardin County Sheriff’s Deputy Brian Reed aimed an AK-47 at Simba.

 

Deputy Chad Vinyard and Cave In Rock Police Officers Mike and Terry Dutton ran up behind him, Vinyard on a radio to the county’s chief deputy, Bill Stark, asking for ideas.

 

Stark was speeding in a car with Sheriff Carl Cox, who said he and Stark peered into the failing February light at the dense forest rushing past their car and made a decision.

 

“We didn’t want the animal loose,” Cox said.

 

Stark told them that if they had a clear shot, to take it. “Just make it a kill shot,” he told them over the radio.
The police officers turned to Abell. Fifteen years of raising big cats came to a single tearful nod. Vinyard counted to three.

 

At the first volley, Simba jumped 10 feet, two wounds in his head. Slinking toward a shed, the lion was hit again by Dutton and Reed. Officers came to within a few paces as the lion finally collapsed, and two more shots rang out. Simba stopped breathing.

 

Vinyard’s voice crackled over the radio.

 

“The lion’s down,” he said.

 

That was when Kathie Abell found her husband, noted Reed and Dutton. “We heard Kathie Abell screaming approximately 50 yards away,” Dutton wrote.

 

Paramedics tried CPR, then evacuated Al Abell by air without ever hearing a sound from his lungs. His skin was cold, dry and pale. The coroner determined he had died in minutes, his life pouring out the bite wound in his left thigh.

 

Kathie Abell gave the lion’s carcass to zoology students at Southern Illinois University, where the heaping, frozen body was thawed and dissected two months later.

 

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2005-10-14/news/0510140304_1_big-cats-exotic-animals-wolves/2

 

Deadly Lion Attack

HARDIN CO., IL — Authorities say an Illinois man who kept exotic animals was attacked and killed Thursday by a pet African lion.

Sheriff Carl Cox says Al Abell was apparently changing the bedding of thelion’s pen when he was attacked. Cox says Abell’s wife returned to the couple’s home near Elizabethtown in southeastern Illinois, shortly before 6 p-m. She saw the lion out of its pen and called the sheriff’s office.

Deputies killed the lion and then discovered Abell lying nearby. Coroner Roger Little says he was taken to Hardin County Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 8:37 p.m.

An autopsy is scheduled for today. Jeffrey Bonner, the president of the St. Louis Zoo, says Abell’s death illustrates just how dangerous wild animals can be.

http://www.kfvs12.com/Global/story.asp?S=1644398&pass=1

 

 

Nov. 17: 8:45pm Big Cat Rescuers arrive at the Cave In Rock Lodge.  It is a tiny, yet historic lodge nestled in the Shawnee National Park.  Cave In Rock Park is named for the 55-foot-wide cave that was carved out of the limestone rock by water thousands of years ago. Following the Revolutionary War, this immense recess came to serve as the ideal lair for outlaws, bandits and river pirates who preyed on the people traveling along the Ohio River.Sassy the cougar now at Big Cat RescueOne of the most ambitious of these ruthless malefactors was Samuel Mason. Once an officer in George Washington’s Revolutionary Army, in 1797 he converted the cavern into a tavern which he called the Cave-In-Rock.  From this apparently innocent and inviting position, Mason would dispatch his cohorts upriver to befriend unwary and bewildered travelers with offers of help and guidance. As they neared the cave, these henchmen would disable their boats or force them toward the yawning hollow, where the hapless pilgrims would be robbed, or worse. Few victims lived to tell their story.

 

By the early 1800s, following the demise of the Mason Gang, the cave sheltered the even more notorious Harpe Brothers, a pair of killers fleeing execution in Kentucky. They continued their personal reign of thievery and murder in Illinois, using the cave as hideout and headquarters until they too were killed.

 

It’s interesting to note that the cave served as a backdrop for a scene in the movie “How The West Was Won.” The scene was a near-accurate portrayal of how, in the 18th and 19th centuries, ruthless bandits used the cave to lure unsuspecting travelers to an untimely end.

 

Freddy cougar and Jamie at Big Cat RescueAlthough other desperadoes continued to take advantage of the secrecy and seclusion afforded by Cave-In-Rock, by the mid-1830s the quickening westward expansion of civilization and the steady growth in the local population and commerce had destroyed or driven out the “river rats” and the cave began to serve as temporary shelter for other pioneers on their way west.

 

Nov. 19: 3:52 am the Big Cat Rescue team and Freddy and Sassy the cougars arrived at Big Cat Rescue, but it was too dark to safely let them out, so everyone slept for a couple of hours and waited for dawn.

 

6:30 am The staff, volunteer committe and board were invited to see the release, but it had been sent out so late that only Chelsea, Howard and I came to watch Jamie, Gale, Chris & Chelsea release Freddy and Sassy into their new, spacious, lakeside homes.  Video will be coming soon; once Chris has some time to sleep, get married, renew his driver’s license and piece together the footage and interviews.  Meanwhile, a picture (or two) is worth a thousand words.

 

6:30 pm Jamie hand fed Freddy and Sassy from a stick tonight to get a good look at their teeth and to begin a bonding process with them.  Our main diet is a prepared ground diet of muscle meat, organs, bones and vitamins but it will be a gradual process to move these cats to the healthier fare.  She gave them a few balls on the end of the stick and they weren’t crazy about it.  They each ate a chicken leg quarter, a plate of necks, and several chunks of beef.  Jamie said they would have eaten more, but she didn’t want to overload their systems, so she left some more of the ground diet, so that they wouldn’t go to bed hungry.  The ground diet comes in three fat content levels, so we may try them on the higher content to get them liking it and then scale back once they are in good condition again.  Both cats have been very calm and acting like they have known us forever, so all is well tonight at Big Cat Rescue.

 

 

Big Cat Rescue is an educational sanctuary and a home for more than 100 big cats  12802 Easy St. Tampa, FL 33625 813.920.4130

 

Sassyfrass Vet Visit 2014

Vet-Sassyfrass-Cougar-2014

Sassyfrass the cougar didn’t come out to eat last night, so we knew something was up and set an appointment to see the vet.

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Sassyfrass the cougar has failing kidneys, and is incontinent, so he pees on himself in his sleep and then lays in it.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

He is old and arthritic, so he can’t groom himself any more and his fur gets matted.

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

We have to shave him once a year so we decide to do it while he is at the vet’s office under sedation.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Volunteers load up Sassyfrass the cougar and take him into our on site cat hospital to await transfer to the van.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

He will be weighed so we know how much sedation to give at the vet’s office.  He weighs 134 lbs.

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

We will check his blood again to see how much his kidney failure has progressed.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

His transport cage is supported by long poles so the keepers don’t get their hands near him.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Every time we go to the vet we try to choose an Intern or Volunteer to go with us for their education.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Gale put Michael to work, helping her shave Sassyfrass while the vet and vet techs did their work up on him.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Sassyfrass’ breath would knock you over, and they thought there must be bad teeth, but after cleaning and X-rays, they saw that none needed to be pulled.

 

Vet Sassyfrass Cougar 2014

Sassyfrass does have one eye with blood in the chamber, so he is being treated for that and he had ulcerations on his tongue; but no obvious cause.  The rest of his blood work was sent out for further testing.

Valentine15_Sassy022 Valentine15_Sassy021-FB Valentine15_Sassy020 Valentine15_Sassy019 Valentine15_Sassy018 Valentine15_Sassy017 Valentine15_Sassy014 Valentine15_Sassy013 Valentine15_Sassy012 Valentine15_Sassy006 Valentine15_Sassy004 Valentine15_Sassy003

Phoenix Rehab

Phoenix Rehab

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Phoenix and Captiva

(Warning to chicken lovers, there is a photo on the page of the bobcat eating a chick.  These chicks arrive frozen and are the byproduct of the egg industry.  All male chicks are usually disposed of at birth.  We buy them to feed our cats because whole prey is the most wholesome for the cats.) 

Rehab Bobcat Kitten Adult Phoenix

We have cameras on the outdoor enclosures, but not enough band width to open it up for public access.  Here is a screen capture:

Bobcat Kittens

Donate to big cats

 

This is just one section of their 5 section rehab run.

Rehab Bobcat Kittens 2015

Phoenix and Captiva ~ Rescued June 2015

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten
There are two more mouths to feed at Big Cat Rescue! Phoenix and Captiva are two little Florida bobcat kittens who both lost their moms recently in very different, but equally awful ways.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

Big Cat Rescue is a licensed bobcat rehabber here in Florida We plan to raise these guys at our sanctuary with as little human interaction as possible so they retain their wildness. When they are full grown, we will teach the kittens to hunt and release them back to the wild in a rural area of Florida.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

If you’d like to donate to the care and upbringing of these amazing kittens, click HERE.

 

Phoenix

Phoenix managed to live through a forest fire last week in Lee County, Florida.  Officials hoped to reunite the kitten with his mother, by leaving him near where he was found after an initial assessment that he seemed ok. But three days later, the kitten was dehydrated and still calling frantically for his mother, so he was sent on June 1 to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). Staff at CROW evaluated Phoenix and helped him recover well before delivering both kittens to Big Cat Rescue on June 25, 2015 for the next phase of their rehab for release.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

We think there could be no more appropriate name than Phoenix, the mythological symbol who raises from the ashes to be reborn.

Here is a compilation of news stories about Phoenix:

 

June 1, 2015: The baby bobcat rescued from a massive brush fire in Lee County last week just underwent a physical at CROW – Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc. Staff says recovery is going well for the kitten. Click here to read more about the rescue: http://bit.ly/1GiR4xE

News updates http://www.nbc-2.com/story/29221676/bobcat-kitten-improves-despite-burns#.VXCyd1xVhBc

http://www.wptv.com/news/state/florida-bobcat-kitten-on-the-mend-after-rescue

 

Captiva

Rehab-BobcatThe larger kitten doesn’t have a name, and I am just using Captiva here as a holding space.

Captiva’s story is every bit as heart rending, but didn’t make the news.  She was the one Big Cat Rescue agreed to take first.  Gareth Johnson, the CROW Hospital Manager, worked with us a few years ago when we rehabbed and released bobcat Copter.  Gareth called Big Cat Rescue on June 1 to report that some people had trapped a bobcat kitten and then left it in the trap without food or water for a couple days before deciding they should feed her something.  Of course, they had no idea what to feed a 4-week-old nursing bobcat kitten, so what they fed her made her sick. Lucky for Captiva, they finally made a good decision and dropped her off at CROW.  The kitten was stabilized, despite the fact that she arrived in such bad shape no one thought that was possible.

CROW has state of the art medical facilities, but is not set up for bobcat rehab. Raising and rehabilitation a bobcat requires a lot of space and infrastructure.  Gareth called and asked if we would be able to take the little one.  I told him that I’d be happy to drive the 5-hour round trip to pick up the little darling.  Gareth wanted to do a SNAP test first and said he’d call me to come get her as soon as that was done.

Meanwhile Phoenix, the bobcat kitten who survived the forest fire, was directed by the Florida Wildlife Commission to be sent to CROW and he arrived that same evening, June 1.

 

More photos of Phoenix and Captiva

 

Phoenix-Rehab

Rehab-Bobcat_5427113543011086466_o Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-5 Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-4 Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-1
Phoenix and Captive Bobcats get two new friends!

http://bigcatrescue.org/4-bobcat-kittens/

 

 

 

Cubs

Cubs

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Be a Big Cat Friendly Tourist!

Big Cat Ban Save the CubsDid you know that big cats and cubs are exploited and even abused at tourist attractions here in the U.S. and in dozens of countries around the world?

What can you do to make sure you don’t unwittingly participate in tourist activities that exploit big cats and other wild animals?

Easy ways YOU and your family can be responsible tourists:
• Never pay to touch or have your photo taken with a tiger or lion cub
• Don’t attend circuses, fairs, or attractions that feature wild animal shows
• Don’t purchase items made from wild animals, such as furs and rugs
• Don’t partake in local “delicacies” made from wild animals, such as tiger bone wine
• Only visit sanctuaries that are accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (www.sanctuaryfederation.org).

Sign up here to be kept in the loop when your voice is needed to protect big cats and their cubs: Sign up for big cat alerts and as an added benefit you will be entered for a chance to win our Animal Lover’s Dream Vacation.

 

As an animal lover, if someone were to make you this offer, would you accept?

You can pet, play with and bottle feed this cub and we’ll take a picture of you so you can share it with your friends – BUT, it means one of the following will happen to this cub once he/she is too big for this anymore:

  • This cub will suffer the rest of his/her life in a cage without proper food or care.
  • This cub will be shipped off to a hunting ranch to be shot for a price.
  • This cub will be slaughtered for the exotic meat market.
  • This cub will be sold off at auction to the highest bidder, fate unknown.
  • This cub will be killed for parts and bones for the medicinal market.
  • This cub will be lost in the illegal black market trade of exotic animals.

We know you’d never say “yes” to any of these. You love animals. That’s why you want this experience. But, that’s exactly what you agree to when you say “yes” to this thrill-of-a-lifetime offer.

It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about tourist attractions in South Africa, Mexico, or the United States. Sadly, this is the fate for so many cubs bred for money-making ventures like these. An exhibitor in Oklahoma, that Big Cat Rescue sued, said he could make $27,000 each week offering animal interactions like this. It’s obvious, money is what drives the industry – and the breeding.

Download Cub Handling Factsheet

Sign the petition

But someone is surely regulating this, right?

In the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) feels there should be no contact with cubs under the age of eight weeks since that’s when they receive their first disease-preventing injections. They also feel there should be no contact with cubs over 12 weeks old since they can be dangerous even at that young age. But these are just guidelines, not regulations. If breeders/exhibitors were to follow these guidelines, it means a cub used for public contact would have a “shelf life” of only four weeks! What does this encourage? Rampant breeding and not following these guidelines. Where do they all go when they’re too old and can no longer be used for public contact? Refer to the list above.

Don’t inspectors make sure everything’s ok for these cubs?

In 2011 in the United States, there were only 105 USDA inspectors to monitor almost 8,000 facilities, ranging from slaughterhouses, pet stores, pet breeders and dealers, farm, laboratories and other animal-related businesses. That’s nearly one inspector for every 80 facilities! When traveling exhibitors often move these cubs all over the country to fairs, festivals, and malls, relying on inspectors to ensure quality of care for them is unrealistic. And even when cubs are being exhibited when they’re too young or too old, violators aren’t cited unless an inspector is there to personally see serious harm to the cub – screaming and squirming isn’t enough.

Doesn’t touching a tiger or lion help promote conservation since we’re losing them in the wild?

As more and more of these cub petting attractions spring up everywhere, guess what? Tigers and lions in the wild are endangered and becoming nearly extinct. In fact, touching a cub does nothing to conserve their cousins in the wild.

Tragically, it may be doing the opposite. If you can visit a facility to pet a tiger cub, then why protect them half a world away where you may never see them? Studies have shown that public interaction with captive wild animals has done very little to cause the public to donate to conservation in the wild. And there’s been no successful release of a captive-born tiger or lion to date. When a cub needs to be with its mother for at least two years to learn survival skills, this simply isn’t something humans can duplicate. So, the answer is “no,” touching a lion or tiger cub in no way helps save them in the wild.

Big Cat Friendly Tourist

What can we do?

  • GiveCubAbuseAsk your member of Congress to champion the Big Cat Public Safety Act!  This would put an end to the private possession and backyard breeding of big cats.  Get the factsheet.
  • Contact the USDA by emailing them at: aceast@aphis.usda.gov . Let them know you want to see an end to physical contact with big cats, to prohibit public handling of young or immature big cats, and to stop the separation of cubs from their mothers before the species-typical age of weaning.
  • Never, ever give in to the temptation of public contact with a wild cat. It’s dangerous for you and sentences these big cats to life in a cage – or far worse.
  • Educate friends, family, and media about the reality of this cruel practice. So few know this is an insidious form of animal abuse,  but now you do. Share it through social media channels too.
  • The next time you see a cub in your town or at some of the tourist attractions you visit while on vacation, we hope you’ll remember the truth and you’ll help raise awareness. When the demand ends, so will those who profit by supplying these experiences.

Together, let’s be their voice and assure no more cubs suffer an awful fate.  (Article by Julie Hanan for One Green Planet)

Why Petting Cubs Leads to Abuse

 

Here our radio ad to educate parents about swimming with cubs:

Hear the highlights from this page:

 

 

The Truth About Tiger Cub Petting Displays in Malls

By Howard Baskin, JD, MBA, Advisory Board Chairman of Big Cat Rescue, Tampa, FL

 

Breeders who charge the public to pet and take photos with young tiger cubs tell venues and customers some or all of the following lies:

1) That the exhibitors are “rescuers” and operate “sanctuaries”

2) That the cubs have a good life while being used to make money:

a) they enjoy being carted around the country in a semi and repeatedly awakened and handled by dozens of people all day

b) that blowing in the cubs face “calms” them down

c) that dangling them by holding under their front arms and bouncing them up and down “resets” them

cubs at the mall

Cubs at the mall always = cub abuse

d) that close up photos with flash does not harm the cubs

3) that it is safe for the cubs and for humans, and legal, to allow contact with cubs from when they are only a few weeks old to when they are six months or more old.

4) that the exhibitor must keep constantly breeding and using the cubs to make money because that is the only way he can support the adult animals he keeps.

5) that the exhibitor is doing this to promote conservation in the wild.

6) that the exhibitor is teaching people not to have exotic animals as pets

And the biggest lie of all:

7) that the cubs will have good homes after they get too big to be used to make money from petting

 

THE FACTS ARE

 

1) Breeders/Exhibitors are not sanctuaries.

Most sanctuaries are not accredited

Most sanctuaries are not accredited

True rescuers and sanctuaries do not breed.  Breeding more tigers simply adds to the number of big cats that end up living in deplorable conditions or being destroyed to supply the illegal trade in tiger parts.  The Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) is the most highly respected body that defines what a true sanctuary is and sets standards of animal care and practices that sanctuaries must meet in order to be accredited. Facilities that breed or subject the animals to the stress of being carted around to exhibit definition are not sanctuaries.  For more about the difference between real and “pseudo” sanctuaries, visit the GFAS website at http://www.sanctuaryfederation.org/gfas/for-public/truth-about-sanctuaries/

In addition to not being a sanctuary because they breed and do offsite exhibits, these people who claim to love animals so much typically operate facilities where the animal care, while it may comply with USDA’s minimal standards, is far below the standards set by GFAS as humane, and in many cases is deplorable.

 

2) Life on the road means being torn from mother, denied natural behaviors, and mistreated.

Tiger-Cubs-US-Tabby-TigersThe cubs used for petting exhibits are torn from their mothers shortly after birth, causing emotional pain to both the cubs and the mothers.  Imagine what that mother tiger experiences after enduring the long pregnancy and finally giving birth, filled with the instincts to nurture her cubs, and then having them snatched away.  The breeders take them away and have people handle them so the cubs will “imprint” on the people instead of doing what is natural and imprinting on their mothers.

And what is life like during the months they are used to make money for their owners?  Cubs this age want roam, explore, test their young muscles to develop coordination, and sleep for extended periods of time without interruption. Watch what happens during these exhibits.  The cubs are repeatedly awakened so a customer can pet them instead of being allowed the sleep their young bodies need.  When they try to wander they are repeatedly yanked back.  And where are they when not on exhibit?  They spend endless hours in small cages in trucks, hardly a suitable environment for inquisitive, active young cubs.

While used for petting by the public or held for photos with the public, the cubs squirm and try to get away.  What do the exhibitors do to control them?

One technique used by exhibitors to get the cubs to stop squirming is blowing in the cub’s face.   Contrary to what the exhibitors say, this does not “calm” the cub.  The cub does not like this any more than you would.  This blowing in the face is a way mother tigers discipline their cubs.  It is a punishment.  The cub becomes inactive temporarily not because the cub is calm.  The cub becomes inactive hoping that not moving will cause the exhibitor to stop blowing in its face.

The other technique is to dangle the cub from under their front armpits and toss them up and down in the air.  One notorious exhibitor tells customers this is to “reset” the cubs.  Another tells customers that this is how the mother tiger holds the cubs, which is equally ridiculous.  Being held under the arms and tossed up in the air is just another unnatural and unpleasant experience that causes the cub stress, making them temporarily stop doing the behavior that is natural, i.e. trying to squirm away from being held.

What happens when the cubs are sick?  The video at www.TigerCubAbuse.com shows cubs with severe diarrhea kept on display.  The keepers simply follow them around wiping diarrhea off the floor, and then use the same towel to wipe the cubs’ irritated rear ends as the poor cubs scream in pain.

How would you feel if you were their mother and knew this was the life they had been torn from you to endure?

 

3) Cubs are routinely used to make money both below and above the legal age.

 

Most big cats endure squalid conditions

Most big cats endure squalid conditions

While cub displays are inherently cruel for the reasons given in this fact sheet, USDA regulations do allow them, but only for a few weeks.  USDA has ruled that there should be no public contact with the cubs until they are at least 8 weeks old because that is when they receive their first injections to prevent disease.  USDA has ruled that there should be no public contact after the cubs are 12 weeks old because they are large enough to be dangerous.  So, the only time it is “legal” to have the public pet cubs is when they are between the ages of 8 weeks and 12 weeks.

However, because enforcement resources are limited, exhibitors flagrantly violate these rules, putting the cubs and the public at risk.  Videos at www.TigerCubAbuse.com and www.TigerCubAbuse2.com show exhibitors freely admitting on camera that the cubs are under 8 weeks old.  The video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE8CXQLKfq0 shows people playing with 5 and 7 month old cubs at G.W. Exotic Animal Park, home base for Joe Schreibvogel and Beth Corley, who operate the most notorious mall exhibit road show.  Twenty-three of this exhibitor’s cubs died in 2010.

 

4) Abusing cubs is not a necessary or justifiable way to make money to support adult cats.

 

The exhibitors often claim they have no choice, that they must breed and exploit cubs to make money to support their other animals.  Joe Schreibvogel posts on Facebook “I don’t think none of us like to be forced to be in the entertainment of animals (sic).”  But the truth is that true sanctuaries all over the country support their animals without abusing some in order to make money to feed the others.  They do this by providing a great home for the animals that far exceeds the minimal legal requirements and then learning how to attract donors who appreciate the excellent home they are providing. Lacking the ability to do this is not an excuse for abusing tiger cubs to make money. People who are not capable of operating a real sanctuary simply should not own animals.  No true animal lover could justify abusing some animals to provide financial support for others.

 

5) Paying to pet tigers does not support conservation in the wild.

 

Skins from poached tigers

Captive breeding causes more poaching

No money the public spends to pet or take photos with tiger cubs ever goes to support conservation in the wild.  In fact, the opposite is true.  There is a huge and growing market for tiger parts like the skins pictured here, and tiger “derivatives”, i.e. products made out of tiger parts like tiger bone wine.  A dead tiger is worth up to $50,000 for its parts. Breeding what US Fish and Wildlife Service calls “generic” tigers like the ones used in the mall exhibits is not tracked.  So there is no way to know how many U.S. born tigers are killed to have their parts illegally sold into this trade.  And, the more that trade expands, the more incentive the poachers have to kill tigers in the wild.

 

6) Petting cubs sends the wrong message about exotic animals as pets.

 

Exhibitors often claim that they are teaching people that exotic animals should not be pets.  But what example do they set as they handle the animals and let others do so?  Saying that exotic animals do not make good pets while charging people to pet them is a little bit like someone telling people not to use heroin while having a needle sticking in their arm.  “Do as I say, not as I do” is not a message that works.  The websites of these exhibitors frequently show photos or videos of the exhibitor handling, hugging or kissing adult tigers. This encourages other people to want to be “special” like the exhibitor.

The way to encourage people not to want exotic animals as pets is to set an example by never having physical contact with them.  This is what true sanctuaries, people who truly care about the animals, do.  Meantime, exhibitors like Joe Schreibvogel actively support of private ownership of exotic animals as pets.  He has conducted a fundraiser for an organization devoted to, “fighting for the rights of everyday people….to keep, house and maintain exotic animals”.  Schreibvogel’s 2010 fund raising event was attended by people who brought their pet primates. He created an “association” whose website has a page offering baby white tigers for sale. Many of the followers on the “Joe Exotic” Facebook page are obviously exotic pet owners.  The G.W. Exotic website actively rails against the steady trend of laws banning private ownership to protect the public and stop abuse of the animals.

Private ownership of exotic animals results in widespread abuse as cute young animals mature and end up being kept in deplorable conditions. While some exhibitors claim they are teaching people not to get exotic animals as pets, others actively promote the trade.   But all of them, by their behavior, encourage people to own exotic animals in order to be one of the “special” people who can have contact with these animals.

 

7) The cubs are destined for a horrible existence after they are too big to use to make money.

 

Big cats are often kept in concrete & steel jail cells

Big cats are often kept in concrete & steel jail cells

This is the single biggest reason not to permit cub displays.  If asked, exhibitors tell venues and patrons that the cubs will end up in some wonderful home, either at their facilities or elsewhere.  Current USDA rules allow an owner to keep a tiger in a concrete floored, chain link jail cell not much bigger than a parking space, often with nothing to do but walk in circles or stare out.  Enforcement of the rules that do exist is limited because it would be economically unfeasible to have enough inspectors to adequately monitor the thousands of tigers owned by people licensed by USDA to exhibit animals.   These are animals built to live in the wild, roaming and hunting.   They are very intelligent and they experience a broad range of emotions.

We treat criminals in prison far better than the way most owners end up treating captive tigers, whose only crime was being bred by a breeder/exhibitor to make money.  Attached are photos that are not exceptions.  They are typical of the conditions in which the cubs that are bred by private owners will end up.

 

8) There is potential for disease and liability.

 

A May 2011 statement from the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV) recommends that the public be prohibited from direct contact with tigers due to the risk of illness to humans stating” …ringworm in 23 persons and multiple animal species was traced to a Microsporum canis infection in a hand-reared zoo tiger cub.”  Zoonotic diseases — those that jump to humans — account for three quarters of all emerging infectious threats, the Center for Disease Control says. Five of the six diseases the agency regards as top threats to national security are zoonotic.  The Journal of Internal Medicine this month estimated that 50 million people worldwide have been infected with zoonotic diseases since 2000 and as many as 78,000 have died.

 

Cub petting has been an evil practice for far too long

Cub petting has been an evil practice for far too long

 

PUBLIC IMAGE ISSUE FOR VENUES

 

Changes in values in our society do not happen suddenly.  It took decades of educating and changing people’s minds before women finally got the right to vote, something we take for granted today.  A similar progression occurred in the area of civil rights.  The same shift is taking place at an accelerating rate with respect to our society’s view of private ownership of big cats.

Compelling evidence of this is found in the trend in state laws.  Just since 2005, nine more states have banned private ownership of big cats, generally recognizing that such ownership is dangerous to people and results in the animals being kept in deplorable conditions.

The public doesn't see how most big cats are kept

The public doesn’t see how most big cats are kept

Many people innocently support the abuse by patronizing the cub displays.  The cubs are adorable, and the exhibitors are skilled at telling their lies.  But, increasingly numbers of people are aware of the issues presented in this fact sheet, or on their own simply see the displays and find them repellant.  As the number of people of people who find such displays objectionable grows, venues like malls increasingly make a negative impression on patrons in a way they cannot necessarily measure.  Venues like Petsmart stores, Alton Square Mall in Alton, IL, and Metro North Mall in Kansas City, MO have led by banning exotic animal displays.

As more and more people become aware of what happens “behind the scenes” and actively object to the cub displays, more and more venues will ban the displays. In the meantime, venues who allow the displays make a negative impression on many customers who care about animals while many tiny cubs are condemned to lifelong misery.

As a venue, you can make a wonderful contribution to society by helping stop this abuse, while at the same time sending a very positive branding image to the many customers who love animals and do not want to see them being abused when they come to shop.

We hope the information in this fact sheet is useful.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Susan Bass, Director of Public Relations at Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, Florida at 813-431-2720 or Susan.Bass@BigCatRescue.org.  Venues that these exhibitors lie to in making their pitch to be allowed to display have a critical choice.  They can be part of the problem, encouraging this abuse by permitting it, or part of the solution.  We hope you will send a positive public relations image to your many animal loving patrons and help save these innocent tigers from abuse by banning such exhibits in your venue.

Get the brochure to hand out when you see cub abuse at malls, fairs, flea markets and schools.

See more video of the horrible conditions where big cats are kept

 

 

This video talks to Big Cat Experts Around the Globe About How Petting Cubs Kills Tigers in the Wild

 

 

See a cub man handled for paying guests to get their picture at the mall

Note that the handler stands on the cub to subdue him

 

How Can You Tell if a Tiger Cub is Too Young or Too Old?

It’s almost impossible for regulatory agents to determine if a cub being used on display is truly within the legal age range of 8 weeks to 12 weeks.  This photo composite shows tiger cubs at different ages and in relation to people to give you an idea of what is likely to be a legal size petting / photo op cub and what is not.  Note that we do not believe cubs should be used for petting or photo props at any age.  Cubs belong with their mothers and in the wild.

Click on the image to see it larger.

Tiger Cubs Ages 2 Weeks to 12 Weeks

Tiger Cubs Ages 2 Weeks to 12 Weeks

The American Zoological Association is the accrediting body for zoos, like the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries is the accrediting body for sanctuaries.  Only 10 % of the facilities in the U.S. that are housing wild animals are accredited.  GFAS does not condone unescorted public visitation or contact with the captive wild animals and the AZA also states the following (emphasis added):  http://www.aza.org/Education/detail.aspx?id=2451

 

V. Conservation Education Message 
As noted in the AZA Accreditation Standards, if animal demonstrations are part of an institution’s programs, an educational and conservation message must be an integral component. The Program Animal Policy should address the specific messages related to the use of program animals, as well as the need to be cautious about hidden or conflicting messages (e.g., “petting” an animal while stating verbally that it makes a poor pet). This section may include or reference the AZA Conservation Messages. Although education value and messages should be part of the general collection planning process, this aspect is so critical to the use of program animals that it deserves additional attention. In addition, it is highly recommended to encourage the use of biofacts in addition to or in place of the live animals. Whenever possible, evaluation of the effectiveness of presenting program animals should be built into education programs.  http://www.aza.org/animal-contact-policy/

At a 2002 meeting of the Tiger Species Survival Plan members it was decided that, “A second concern is the relationship between the Tiger SSP and the private sector, where many tigers (mostly of unknown origin) are kept.  During the 2002 Tiger SSP master plan meeting in Portland there was a discussion of the appropriateness of handling tigers in public places by AZA zoos. There was complete consensus of all members in attendance that such actions place the viewing public at risk of injury or death, that there is no education message of value being delivered, that such actions promote private ownership and a false sense of safe handling of exotic big cats, and that the animal itself loses its dignity as an ambassador from the wild.  As a result, the committee resolved such actions were inappropriate for AZA-accredited zoos, and that the AZA accreditation committee should make compliance of this restriction part of its accreditation process.  This opinion statement was conveyed to the executive committee of the Felid TAG for comments and action.”

Mammals: Small Carnivores 


In general, due to the potential for bites, small carnivores should be used in contact areas only with extreme caution. Due to the risk of bites, small felids are generally not used in direct contact. If they are, care must be taken that such animals are negative for infection with Toxoplasma gondii. All carnivores should be tested for and be free of zoonotic species of roundworms such asBaylascaris sp. Small carnivores (e.g., raccoons and skunks) obtained from the wild may present a greater risk of rabies and their use should be avoided in contact areas.

#ProtectOurMascots

QR-SaveTheTiger

Click the image to get the 8 x 10 poster image to post at your school, civic center, on your car, or anywhere else you can reach people who want to save tigers.

Nikita

Nikita

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hear big catsNikita

Lioness

DOB 2/3/01

Rescue 11/30/01

Nikita was found chained to the wall in a crack house during a drug bust in Tennessee. Because she had been confined to a concrete floor, she had huge swellings on her elbows that took months to heal.  She was so thin that you could carry her under one arm.  She would only eat white rabbits, so she had a plethora of nutritional issues to deal with as well.

The authorities took her to the Nashville Zoo at Grasmere, but she had been declawed and could not live with the zoo’s other lions.  They had to find a new home for her, so we received the call. Big Cat Rescue agreed to take Nikita in, as well as three other Bobcats who all arrived on 11/30/01.

Nikita has flourished under our care.  She has grown into a tall, lanky, healthy lioness.  She’s extremely playful and loves to roll on her back and grab her paws or try to do somersaults whenever she has visitors stopping by to talk with her.   Though we wish she had the freedom she deserves, we’re so happy that she survived her earlier ordeals to enjoy the blissful days we try to provide for her here.

Sponsor Nikita http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Watch Nikita Lion LIVE on explore.org

LIVE lion web cam

Here is a list of pages on our site that you can find more information, photos, and videos of Nikita Lion.

See Chris & Gale setting up Piñatas for Cameron and Nikita the lions and Zabu the white tiger in this Wildcat Walkabout Video on April 25, 2014 – http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-april-25-2014/

Pumpkin time for Nikita Lion: http://bigcatrescue.org/pumpkin-time-for-nikita-she-seems-pretty-happy-about-it-lion-pumpkin-halloween-funny/

Nikita Lioness seized in drug raid! http://bigcatrescue.org/lion-seized-in-drug-raid/ and http://bigcatrescue.org/000news/Advocat/2012-2.pdf

Nikita Lioness all grown up: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-24-lion-cage-grand-opening/

The walls start to go up on a new play yard for Nikita: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-aug-21-2/

Nikita the lioness loves her new view and can’t wait for room addition: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-jan-29-army-strong/

The last couple wall go up: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-12-iphone-5-announced/3/

Watch Nikita the Lion explore her new enclosure! http://bigcatrescue.org/new-lion-home/

Photos of Gayle talking to Nikita Lion: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-talk-like-a-pirate-day/

I wonder what Nikita is thinking while she watches the volunteers and Interns working? http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-14/

LION VS Big Yellow Ball = Lion Wins! Watch our goofy lioness Nikita take on her new yellow boomer ball! Enrichment is an important part of our cats lives at the sanctuary they will never be free and wild, so we have to keep their minds stimulated with new toys and enrichment, ensuring the best quality life in captivity. http://bigcatrescue.org/lion-vs-big-yellow-ball/

Another photo of Nikita: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-6-2/

Watch as our tigers and lions have fun destroying whole watermelons! http://bigcatrescue.org/tag/lions/page/25/

We didn’t think Nikita Lion would ever feel comfortable going into a confined space like one of our feeding lockouts, but she looks pretty content. http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-16/

RNC visits Big Cat Rescue Lioness Nikita: http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-aug-29-2/4/

See photos – Dr Justin used a bent spoon to dislodge a stick that had gotten stuck across the roof of Nikita Lioness’ mouth. http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-5-2/

Nikita Lion and her yellow ball

Nikita Lion and her yellow ball

 

 

Nikita Lion "I Haz Feets"

Nikita Lion “I Haz Feets”

Meet the rest of our exotic wild cats.