Today at Big Cat Rescue Feb 4 2013

USDA Cracks Down on Traveling Acts

Here’s the great part about the following article:

If cub petting displays have to identify their cubs by name, sex, age, species and identifying markings AND has to reveal who the real owners of the cubs are, then it will be easier for USDA to catch them when cubs disappear and it will be easier for USDA to see that they are using the cubs too young (under 8 weeks according to the USDA Big Cat FAQ) and too old (according to USDA court cases where they found 12 weeks to be the oldest allowed.)

 

USDA Publishes Final Rule to Help Ensure Health of Animals While Traveling

cub petting

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has amended the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) regulations to require traveling exhibitors to submit itineraries to the agency 48 hours in advance of travel so that inspectors will know where regulated animals are located.

“This rule will help APHIS ensure animals are receiving humane care and treatment while they are away from their main facility,” APHIS Acting Administrator Kevin Shea.

In the final rule, APHIS has clarified that only those exhibitors traveling overnight or longer away from the main facility would need to provide itinerary information. The itineraries must include:

  • the name and license/registration number under the AWA of the person who will exhibit the animals, and the name of the person who owns the animals if any animals are leased, borrowed or loaned;
  • the name, identification number or identifying characteristics, species (common or scientific name), sex and age of each animal;
  • the dates and locations where the animals will travel, be housed, and be exhibited, and including all anticipated dates and locations for any stops and layovers.

Exhibitors can choose to submit their itineraries via fax, USPS mail, or e-mail.

Questions and Answers regarding this rule and an optional itinerary form are accessible from the Animal Welfare web site.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/Itinerary_Submission_final_rule.shtml

 

There are less than 100 USDA inspectors (closer to 50 in 2013 who actually deal with wild animals) to try and keep track of all of these cub petting schemes, but it is a start in the right direction.  What USDA needs to do, in order to protect the animals and the public is to ban public contact with exotic cats altogether.  We believe that they can do so under their current authority and along with the Big Cat Coalition have submitted a formal 70 page petition spelling that out for them.

 

Apache Bobcat Loves Spice Bag

See more great videos at BigCatTV.com

 

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Feb 2 2013

Big Cats Need a Vacation!

 

Tigers, Lions, Leopards and more are all waiting to go on vacation!
Please donate here: http://www.razoo.com/story/Bigcatvacation

You may be wondering: How will Big Cat Rescue’s cats be able to go on vacation? Well, we have recently received zoning approval to build a huge 2.5 acre enclosure on the Southwest end of our 55-acre property. It’s been our dream for years to be able to construct a special enclosure that can be used to rotate cats in and out of their permanent enclosures. Once construction is complete, the cats will enjoy two-week vacations in the new surroundings of our Vacation Rotation enclosure!

It will cost approximately $200,000 to build this 111,600 square-foot dream enclosure for our cats. We have already begun to erect the poles for the perimeter and assemble the materials we will require. To wrap our heads around how HUGE 111,000 square feet actually is, we’ve listed suggested donation amounts as they relate to rooms in a typical home. Your donations now will allow us to continue to move forward with this project, which we estimate will take six months to complete.

WEBSITE: http://bigcatrescue.org
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/bigcatrescue
GOOGLE+:https://plus.google.com/115333849859181638977/posts
TWITTER: http://twitter.com/BigCatRescue
BIG CAT SHOP: http://www.bigcatrescue.biz/

THANK YOU!

Today at Big Cat Rescue Feb 2 2013

 

Alexander Crispin Killed by Tiger During Circus Act

 

http://youtu.be/BD90B1kqGR4

 

Police say that Alexander Crispin, 35, died after being attacked by his tiger inside the Suarez circus tent.  Crispin, who was originally from the United States and worked as a tiger tamer, was bitten on the neck by the enraged animal in the middle of the show.  Crispin was taken by ambulance to the Red Cross hospital Huatabampo, Sonora where he died while receiving medical care, as a result of hypovolemic shock.  Hysterical spectators ran out of the scene during the attack.  It is believed that the tiger was killed during the struggle when beating him did not cause him to release Crispin.

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 31 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 31 2013

Servals need your voice!

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 31 2013The Osceola County Fair in Kissimmee, FL will run from Feb. 8-17. The fair is scheduled to have an “exotic petting zoo” where visitors can pet animals, include servals. There is also a “Great Little Bear Show” during which an adult bear is forced to perform. Would you please contact the fair’s General Manager, Dawn Rowe, to let her know that animal lovers do NOT want to see exotic cats and bears exploited as entertainment and used to make money!

 

Dawn Rowe 321-697-3050 kvls@osceolacountyfair.com

 

You can also politely post comments on the Osceola County Fair Facebook page at

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Osceola-County-Fair-KVLS/148131945227058?fref=ts

 

And on the Facebook page of the fair’s major sponsor,Southern Ford Dealers, at https://www.facebook.com/YourSouthernFordDealers?fref=ts

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 31 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 28 2013

Putting an E-collar on Santino Serval

 

 

Dr Justin, Jamie and Gale Putting an ecollar on Santino Serval at Big Cat Rescue to keep him from licking at the injection site on his back where he was treated for liver inflammation.  Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 28 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 27 2013

 

Santino Serval Goes to Vet

 

 

Santino Serval has been on Marin for the past year and eagerly takes his meds in meat each night, so when he didn’t want to get up for Angie last night, she called Gale, who called Dr Wynn, resulting in a request to bring him in to Ehrlich Animal Hospital. Gale easily netted him as he felt to bad to put up a fight and she and Chris scooted him into the squeeze cage.

Upon arrival, Santino was sedated by Dr Danielson so that all would be ready to roll as Dr Wynn arrived. Heather Wade drew blood, did X-rays and helped with the sonogram. The liver and one kidney were enlarged so he is being treated with antibiotics until his pathology slide results come in, which probably won’t be until Wednesday. During the sonogram Dr Wynn found fluid filled cysts in the liver and was able to aspirate some of the fluid for testing.

He had a temperature of 103 so it looks like his body is trying to fight this, which is a good indicator that it won’t be cancer. That is what we are hoping, anyway.

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 25 2013

Gerrard Larriett Announces Partnership with Charles the Monarch

to Raise Funds for Big Cat Rescue

New York, NY (January 24, 2013), Gerrard Larriett Aromatherapy Pet Care announces their partnership with Charles the Monarch to raise funds for Big Cat Rescue. The partnership aims to raise $10,000 for Big Cat Rescue by donating 10% of the proceeds from the sale of Gerrard Larriett products. In addition, customers will receive 25% off of the purchase of Gerrard Larriett grooming products from their website www.gerrardlarriett.com with promo code “Charles.” 

“We were very excited to be partnering together with our wonderful friends at Gerrard Larriett Aromatherapy Pet Care, Charles Painter and the now world renown Charles the Monarch,” said Jeff Kremer, Big Cat Rescue’s Director of Donor Appreciation. “The sanctuary envisions a world where the animals we share it with are treated with compassion and respect and it is only by working “hand in hand” with like-minded friends that Big Cat Rescue is able to continue to make a positive difference in both the animal as well as human world we share”.

Charles the Monarch is the now world-famous dog, whose owner Charles Painter had him groomed to resemble the Old Dominion University mascot, a lion. The Labrador-poodle mix recently made headlines when several people in his home town of Norfolk, Virginia mistook him for an actual lion resulting in numerous 911 calls.

Big Cat Rescue is the world’s largest accredited sanctuary dedicated entirely to abused and abandoned big cats. Many of these cats are endangered and would stand no chance in the wild. Currently Big Cat rescue is caring for over 100 lions, tigers, bobcats, cougars and other species that have been abandoned, abused, orphaned or saved from poachers. Since 1992, Big Cat Rescue has been the lifeline for these at risk cats and now Gerrard Larriett and Charles the Monarch have stepped up to strengthen that lifeline.

Gerrard Larriett Aromatherapy Pet Care is an in home spa experience for pets that therapeutically tackles the odors that come along with pet ownership. The line includes pet shampoo and pet conditioner, pet freshening and shining spray and handmade deodorizing soy candles for the home. The scents have been personally chosen and each grooming product is designed to be adored by even the most demanding cat, dog or pet parent. Larriett explains, “The collection is presented as an array of top quality fragrances that span pet shampoo & conditioner, pet freshening and shining spray and handmade deodorizing soy candles for the home. Now your pet and you can share a soothing aromatherapy experience with each bath, touch-up spray or candle burn.”

For further press information or images please contact Gerrard Larriett Aromatherapy Pet Care

press@gerrardlarriett.com; 1-888-972-7662

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 25 2013

GUYANA GOVERNMENT AND PANTHERA SIGN HISTORIC JAGUAR CONSERVATION AGREEMENT
MOU with Panthera Launches Guyana’s First Jaguar Conservation Framework
New York, NY – The jaguars of Guyana gained significant ground yesterday with the establishment of the country’s first official jaguar-focused agreement by the government of Guyana and wild cat conservation organization, Panthera.
Gathering in Georgetown, Guyana’s Minister of Natural Resources and the Environment, the Honorable Robert M. Persaud, presided over the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Mr. Joslyn McKenzie, and Panthera’s CEO, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz. Serving as Panthera’s fifth jaguar conservation agreement with a Latin American government, this MOU marks an official commitment by both parties to collaboratively undertake research and conservation initiatives that ensure the protection of Guyana’s national animal, jaguar conservation education among its people, and mitigation of human-jaguar conflicts in the country.
Launching this agreement provides a framework through which Panthera, in partnership with Guyana’s Protected Areas and National Parks Commissions, can strengthen the effectiveness of the country’s Protected Areas System for wildlife, and outline the most effective initiatives to conserve the nation’s jaguars. Several initial activities to be undertaken through the agreement include mapping of the presence and distribution of jaguars across Guyana, and implementing a human-jaguar conflict response team that helps ranchers in livestock husbandry techniques and assesses conflict hotspots to better focus mitigation efforts and reduce conflict.
At the ceremony, the Honorable Robert M. Persaud stated, “We are proud of our new partnership with Panthera to secure the continuity of our sustainable development efforts while conserving our national symbol, the jaguar.”
Panthera’s CEO and jaguar expert, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, continued, “Historically, Guyana has achieved incredible success in sustainably balancing the country’s economic development, natural resource management, the livelihoods of its people, and the preservation of its unique wildlife and wild places. The signing of this jaguar conservation agreement demonstrates the government’s continued commitment to its legacy of conservation alongside economic progress and diversification.”
Panthera’s CEO, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, with Guyana’s Minister of Natural Resources and the Environment, the Honorable Robert M. Persaud, the day of the signing of an historic jaguar conservation agreement between Panthera and the government of Guyana – Jan 2013
Unlike most other Latin American and developing nations rich in natural resources, Guyana has maintained an exemplary model of habitat preservation, assisted by sparse human populations in the southern half of the country and a strong ethic for sustainable development, aided by important regulatory frameworks. In recent years, Guyana has implemented a Low Carbon Development Strategy to protect its 16 million hectares of rainforests and adhere to the United Nations Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD). Additionally, in 2011, Guyana committed to the establishment of the national Protected Areas Act, providing a framework for the management of the country’s preserved landscapes, including those within the Jaguar Corridor.
Such dedication to environmental conservation, along with its unique placement rooted between Venezuela to the north, Brazil to the west and south, and Suriname to the east, has established Guyana’s pristine forest and savanna landscape system as a critical connecting block for jaguar populations in northern South America, and through the Jaguar Corridor. Conceptualized by Dr. Rabinowitz, the Jaguar Corridor Initiative is the backbone of Panthera’s Jaguar Program, which seeks to connect and protect jaguar populations ranging from Mexico to Argentina to ensure the species’ genetic diversity and survival.
Today, Guyana represents one of 18 Latin American countries that is home to the jaguar, and one of 13 countries in which Panthera is conducting jaguar conservation science. In fact, the signing of this MOU comes at the heels of a ten-day exploratory expedition of Guyana’s Rewa River by Panthera’s jaguar scientists, including Vice President and legendary biologist Dr. George Schaller, Northern South America Jaguar Program Regional Director Dr. Esteban Payan, and grantee, Dr. Evi Paemelaere. Along with assessing the state of biodiversity and threats facing this watershed, Panthera’s team made a milestone sighting of the notoriously elusive ‘forest jaguar’ during the trip, indicating the potentially healthy condition of the riparian forests bordering the Rewa River.
“Being able to have a forest jaguar sighting in 10 days in the river is a testament to the good health of this forest. Sometimes years pass without seeing a jaguar in a perfectly sound forest environment,” commented Dr. Payan.
Since 2011, Dr. Paemelaere has led Panthera’s jaguar conservation initiatives in southern Guyana, concentrating on the Karanambu and Dadanawa Ranches of the Rupununi savannas. Traversed by the Rupununi River, these savannas serve as an extraordinary hotspot of biological diversity and an essential element of the Jaguar Corridor, potentially connecting Guyana’s jaguars with those of the Amazons.
A male jaguar on Karanambu Ranch in Guyana’s Rupununi savanna. This jaguar was observed swimming across the Rupununi River on multiple occasions. 2011.
Panthera’s partnership with theKaranambu Trust and Lodge – a former cattle ranch emblematic of historic Guyana turned eco-tourism operation – established the country’s first jaguar monitoring site and first mammal-focused biodiversity survey in the country. Often working on horseback, Panthera’s jaguar scientists conducted surveys on both Karanambu and Dadanawa ranches using camera traps and interviews to determine jaguar density, and assess the extent of human-jaguar conflict and unique threats facing the species.
“A jaguar density of three to four individuals per 100 km2 for the Rupununi savannas means these habitats are as important as rainforests for the conservation of the jaguar,” said Dr. Payan. In partnership with the Karanambu Trust and WWF Guyana, Panthera has also contributed to capacity-building with local Amerindian communities.
In 2013, Panthera is working to assess the state and presence of jaguars inside a logging concession between the Iwokrama Reserve and Central Suriname Nature Reserve, also embedded in the Jaguar Corridor.