Bongo

Bongo

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hear big catsBongo

Male Serval
DOB 3/1/91 – 3/4/16 Read tributes to Bongo at https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/bongo
Arrived at Big Cat Rescue  4/4/95
Bongo came to Big Cat Rescue from an auction on 4/4/95.

He had been raised as a house pet, but his owner could no longer afford to feed and care for him.

She warned us that he doesn’t like people in dark pants or uniforms.

He has the most beautiful, big brown eyes ever to grace a Serval face.

He gets very aggressive over food, but is otherwise gentle.

He is also a favorite of one of the Senior Keepers and will turn into a chirping little kitten vying for her attention whenever she is around.

Bongo’s 25th Birthday!

It’s the grrrreatest kind at Big Cat Rescue today as it marks Bongo’s 25th Birthday.  I think this may qualify him for the Guinness Book of World Records for serval longevity.

Bongo’s Second Dental

 

 

 

Bongo Hears a Lion Roar

 

 

 

 


MORE PAGES ABOUT BONGO

February 15, 2016 – Bongo is sedated for treatment. http://bigcatrescue.org/jumanji-leopard-and-bongo-serval-surgeries/

January 31, 2016 – Bongo was mentioned on this interesting page. http://bigcatrescue.org/skinny/

December 19, 2012 – Bongo is mentioned on this page http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-dec-19-2012-cats-over-20/

April 2012 – Bongo made the monthly Advocat newsletter. http://bigcatrescue.org/advocat-2012-04/

November 12, 2011 – This walkabout page highlights a photo of Bongo POUTING.  Too Cute. http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-nov-12/

October 2011 – Bongo the serval loves special treats and when he refused them one night his keepers became worried.  His behavior had also taken a sudden shift.  Big Cat Rescuers made an appointment for him to visit the vet for an exam.  Wild cats have a natural instinct to hide their injuries or illnesses so they give very few clues as to when they are not feeling well. Bongo was taken to the vet where he was examined, had xrays taken and blood drawn. Bongo looked great for a 20-year-old cat! His coat was full and sleek, his teeth were in perfect condition, his initial blood work indicated his kidney values were within range and his x-rays showed only mild arthritis.  Internal parasites were found in his fecal results for which he was prescribed medication and then he was sent home.

All of the cats at the sanctuary are treated monthly as well as quarterly with specific de-wormers to combat internal parasites, however every now and again some of the cats catch a meal of their own that is not on the Big Cat Rescue menu. We have seen heavy rains during the last few months after which the lizards and frogs thrive.  Bongo being the cat that he is must have eaten one of these slimy visitors that visited his enclosure. While Bongo was at the vet, volunteers and interns took the opportunity to do some landscaping in his enclosure.  They trimmed up the palmetto bushes, gathered up sticks and raked the leaves.  Bongo has completed his course of medication and is doing just fine now, loving his special treats and all.

September 29, 2011 – Bongo went to the vet. http://bigcatrescue.org/today-at-big-cat-rescue-sept-29/

April 2011 – Bongo made The Big Cat Times newspaper http://bigcatrescue.org/000news/Advocat/2011-4.pdf


Want to know more about African Servals? Go to our species info page to fins some fun serval facts. http://bigcatrescue.org/photos-and-facts/

Want to see other cats the call Big Cat Rescue home? This page lists all of the cats by name and species. http://bigcatrescue.org/catbio/

Find ways that YOU can get involved saving big cats, and small ones, too. http://bigcatrescue.org/get-involved/

Do you get our free monthly newsletter so you can stay up to date on the happenings here? http://BigCatRescue.org/Join


 

 

Cougar Facts

Cougar Facts

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Cougar – Felis concolor

 

Common Names: Cougar, Puma, Panther,
Mountain Lion, Catamount
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata (Vertebrata)
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Felidae
Genus: Felinae (Puma)
Species: concolor
Sub-species:
Eastern Texas to Florida – P.c.coryi –IUCN: Endangered, CITES:Appendix I Northeastern US and southeastern Canada Cougar – P.c. couguar – IUCN: Endangered, CITES: Appendix I Central American Cougar – P.c. costaricensis – CITES: Appendix I
Misc: The cougar has the greatest natural distribution of any mammal in the Western Hemisphere except for man.

The cougar is extremely agile and has great jumping power and may leap from the ground up to a height of 18 feet into a tree. It is a good swimmer but prefers not to enter the water. Sight is its most acute sense with a good sense of hearing, but is thought to have a poorly developed sense of smell.

Size and Appearance: The cougar is the largest cat in the genus “felis”, and is comparable in size as the leopard. They vary in length from 59 – 108 inches with a tail length of 21 – 36 inches, and height from 23 – 28 inches at the shoulder. Weight can vary greatly, between 75 and 250 pounds. They have a long body with a small head, short face, and a long neck and tail. They are powerfully built, and the hind legs are larger than the front. The ears are small, short and rounded.

Habitat: The cougar thrives in montane, coniferous forests, lowland tropical forests, swamps, grassland, dry brush country, or any other area with adequate cover and prey.

Distribution: Western North America from British Columbia and south Alberta south through west Wyoming to California and west Texas. Also south Texas, Louisiana, south Alabama, Tennessee, and peninsular Florida.

Reproduction and Offspring: There is no fixed mating season, but in North America, the majority of births occur between late winter and early spring. Females tend to reproduce every other year, and give birth to litters of 1 – 6 (usually 2-3) kittens after a gestation of 90-96 days. Mothers give birth to their young in dens that are lined with moss or vegetation, usually in rock shelters, crevices, piles of rocks, thickets, caves, or some other protected place. Kittens weigh approximately 7-16 ounces at birth, and have spotted coats until they are around 6 months old. They will continue to nurse for 3 or more months, but will begin to take meat at 6 weeks. The kittens will remain with their mothers until they are 1-2 years old, and after separating, siblings will remain together for another 2-3 months. Females reach sexual maturity around 2.5 and males around 3 years. They will not begin to reproduce until they have established themselves a permanent home area. The may remain reproductive until 12 years of age for females, and 20 years for males.

In captivity, cougars have lived over 20 years, as compared to 8 – 10 in the wild.  At Big Cat Rescue one cougar lived to one month shy of 30 years.

Social System and Communication: Cougars are solitary cats and will avoid other individuals except for during mating. They communicate by the use visual and olfactory signals, and the males regularly make scrapes in the soil or snow. Their vocalizations include growls, hisses, and bird-like whistles. They purr like the domestic cats, and during estrus, the females give off loud, hair-raising screams. Hear our purrs, hisses, snarls, calls, and growl sounds HERE

Hunting and Diet: Cougars primarily feed on large mammals, preferring deer, but they will also eat Coyotes, Porcupines, Beaver, mice marmots, hares, raccoons, birds and even grasshoppers. They kill by stalking to within 30 feet of their prey before pouncing from its hiding place. It leaps onto its victim’s back and bites into the neck and holds with its sharp claws.

Principal Threats: According to 2001 statistics provided from actual sales of hunting permits, almost 2100 cougars are still being killed each year. This figure does not include all the cougars killed by hunters who do not buy licenses nor report their kills. Less than 3% of our population are hunters but they kill over 100 million animals each year for sport.

Status: CITES: Appendix I, USDI: Endangered

2003 Felid TAG recommendation: Puma (Puma concolor). A widely held species, the Felid TAG is urging the elimination of this species from collections, whenever possible, in favor of similar-sized, but rarer SSP or PMP felid species. Only acquisition of pumas needed for education or zoogeographic exhibit themes is recommended. With the exception of the Florida panther, no breeding is recommended. The present zoo population of pumas is comprised of more than 200 individuals, and the studbook keeper is striving to reduce this number to 120 or less. In cases of exhibition need, new animals should be acquired from other AZA institutions or, alternatively, cubs from sanctuary or rescue programs.

 

How rare is this cat ? The International Species Information Service lists 334 in zoos worldwide, with 119 being in the U.S.

 

 

Meet our cougars friends:

 

Cougars of BCR

 

http://bigcatrescue.org/catbio/

 

Keisha

Keisha

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Keisha

Tigress

Born 6/25/2000 Rescued 5/28/2014

 

Help care for Keisha Tiger here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Rescue_Keisha

 

Keisha was the second generation of tigers born at that facility and some reports state than five generations were born there over the years.

Keisha is missing a portion of her ear and her entire tail. JnK volunteers reported that she lost both to two lions that shared a common wall with her. It is unknown if she received veterinary care for these injuries or was left that way and luckily survived. All over the compound the bears and big cats shared common walls where they could easily reach through and injure or kill each other.

Despite the first fourteen years of her life being a horrible experience that no animal should have had to endure Keisha’s spirit was never broken. She is full of life and very outgoing. She loves Zeus and once he is neutered we hope to introduce the two.

One of the top experience with Keisha since her arrival was her very first Thanksgiving turkey dinner. Keepers stood by in awe as Keisha pounced around her enclosure as happy as could be with the big bird in her mouth. She couldn’t decide if she wanted to play with it or eat it so she did both for hours. Being witness to such joy from an animal that has seen so much suffering makes the long hours and hard work all worth while.

Keisha the tiger was born in 2000 at a pseudo sanctuary in Sinclairville, NY called JnK’s Call of the Wild.  While the website proclaimed to be a sanctuary, in fact, all but one of the 11 tigers had been bred for use as pay to play props.  According to volunteers, Zeus was the son of the original female, Kimba, and then was bred back to his mother to create the other 9 tigers, including Keisha. This is commonly done on purpose to create white tigers, which are the result of severe inbreeding.

Keisha-Tiger-2014-06-08a

What we saw during the rescue was unimaginable suffering and conditions that clearly threatened everyone in the area. JnK had a pile of citations for not allowing inspectors onto the property, but in many cases those are considered by the bad guys to be far less incriminating than actually answering the gate and letting inspectors see what they are doing.

The NY state attorney’s office decided to send a message to all of the backyard breeders, dealers and pseudo sanctuaries that they would no longer turn a blind eye to the danger that these facilities pose to the public and launched the biggest seizure of wild animals in New York’s history.  With the help of IFAW and several sanctuaries 11 tigers, 3 lions, 3 bears, and 2 wolves were rescued that day in May of 2014.

Keisha only has half an ear and a little bobbed tail. We think she lost them to the lions who lived in the cage next door to her in NY.  All over the compound the bears and big cats shared common walls where they could easily reach through and injure or kill each other.

Big Cat Rescue had gone to NY expecting to bring home four of the tigers, but one had passed away before we got there and no one seemed to know when or how.  The other tiger, who was Keisha and Zeus’ mom, was a 20 year old tigress named Kimba.  She was in such bad condition that we were not able to save her, but at least she died here in comfort, surrounded by love.

Maybe the worst thing about the entire situation in NY was that it is typical of how big cats are treated in America.  You can put an end to that by never paying to see or touch a cub.

To read more about Keisha’s rescue and see photos and videos go to:  http://bigcatrescue.org/jnk/

Keisha and Zeus Vacation Together

The romance didn’t last long.  Keisha is just too playful and pounce-y and just scared Zeus half to death so much of the time that we had to separate them.  They live close to each other, but have their own space to live in peace.

TJ

TJ

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hear big catsTJ

Male Siberian/Bengal Tiger Hybrid

DOB 1999

 

Tiger TJ splashing in pondTJ was the youngest of four tigers who were rescued in 2007 from a breeding facility in Center Hill Florida called Savage Kingdom.  He is quite playful and loves to crash through all of the high grasses in his enclosure. TJ has a particular fascination with water and will splash in and out of his pools or the pond, when he is on vacation in the Vacation Rotation enclosure.  He seems to delight in the way the light moves on the surface of splashing water.

Savage Kingdom was run by an ex circus performer named Robert Baudy who had been famous for his big cat act in the 1950’s.  He boasted that the way you trained a big cat was to chain them to the wall and beat them without mercy until they learned that no matter how much they tried to retaliate, they could never succeed.  Once they were broken they were safe to use in performances.

Times have changed, and so has public opinion about how to treat animals, but tiger taming hasn’t changed.  Cats are routinely beaten, deprived of food and deprived of space in order to make them perform on cue.  Tiger trainers have figured out that no one will pay to see an abused animal, so they make a big show of giving the cats kisses, pats on the head and treats, and tell the public that they only train using love, respect and positive reinforcement.  It is a lie.

rp_TigerTJsinging.jpgWe do positive reinforcement and clicker training to get our cats to do things like lay down, show us their paws, etc. to make it easier for us to deal with their medical needs.  At Big Cat Rescue the cats have the choice of doing the interaction with us and our vets, and if they don’t want to do it, they can walk away.

 

If the “show must go on” then you can bet the cats were abused behind the scenes to make them reliable performers on stage.  Please never pay to see big cats perform.

You can help feed TJ Tiger here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

 

 

 

Savage Kingdom Rescue: TJ, Bella, Modnic and Trucha

 

 

hear big catsA hundred times or more a year Big Cat Rescue is contacted by someone trying to unload a tiger, lion, bobcat, serval or some other exotic cat who has outlived his usefulness. In most cases the people calling are those who have used the animals to support themselves, or to make themselves more popular, and now the cat no longer serves their needs. Then the cat has to go.

Big Cat Rescue can only take in a limited number of big cats each year because each cat is a 10-20 year commitment. Most of the cases do not meet Big Cat Rescue’s criteria for accepting a cat as they will not assist these irresponsible owners in continuing to breed and use animals by being a dumping ground for last year’s babies.

This case at Savage Kingdom was different. Robert Baudy was world renown for producing what are commonly referred to as “throw away tigers” because they are so often lame and cross eyed from the inbreeding that goes into producing the white tigers that will fetch a big price.

When USDA finally shut down the 84 year olds’ breeding activities in August of 2006 an era of abuse came much closer to an end. A friend of Baudy’s had managed to place all but four tigers by May 14, 2007. If she could not find a home for these last four tigers she was going to have them euthanized on May 18th because she could no longer afford the time and resources needed to care for the cats.

TJ, Bella, Modnic, and Trucha were the last four cats that needed a home and Big Cat Rescue stepped in to provide one. On May 18th, 2007, Rescuers transported the four to their new home at BCR. They now have spacious grassy enclosures with shrubs and trees, large mountain dens, and pools to cool off in.

Fatal Attractions – Tigers Unleashed, about TJ and Bella tigers: http://animal.discovery.com/tv-shows/fatal-attractions/videos/tigers-rescued-deleted-scene.htm

 See More About TJ, th Tiger:

Enjoy TJ tiger getting a Piñata in this Wildcat Walkabout Video on April 25, 2014 – http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-april-25-2014/

 

Zeus Tiger

Zeus Tiger

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Zeus

 

Male Tiger Born 9/1/96 Arrived 5/28/14

According to JnK volunteers, Zeus was the son of the original female, Kimba. He was bred back to his mother to create the other nine tigers, including Keisha. This is commonly done on purpose to create white tigers, which are the result of severe inbreeding.

Zeus suffered from an eye injury that would later be diagnosed as a luxated lens. He had been this way for over a year and never received any treatment. Because Zeus was so malnourished upon his arrival we could not perform surgery until he had gained some weight and his overall health stabilized.

Zeus-Tiger

Make sure Zeus Tiger never goes hungry again here:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

After months of specially prepared diets Zeus was finally in a healthy enough state to sedate. An eye specialist examined his eye and discovered that what we thought was his good eye actually had very bad cataracts that limited his vision in that eye tremendously.

The eye with the luxated lens had more vision, but also had an ulcer on the surface. The decision was made to repair the ulcer and see if that was the cause of his pain. If his eye continues to be a source of discomfort it will be removed which will essentially blind him.

While Zeus’ underwent this eye surgery he was also neutered with the hopes that he and Keisha can live with one another. They both seem very interested in the other and pine for each other at the sides of their enclosures.

Zeus and Keisha Tiger Vacation Together

The romance didn’t last long.  Keisha is just too playful and pounce-y and just scared Zeus half to death so much of the time that we had to separate them.  They live close to each other, but have their own space to live in peace.

Zeus the tiger  was born at a pseudo sanctuary in Sinclairville, NY called JnK’s Call of the Wild in 1996.

Zeus-Tiger-nap-2014-06-12

He was saved by Big Cat Rescue in May 2014  when the NY state attorney’s office decided to send a message to all of the backyard breeders, dealers and pseudo sanctuaries that they would no longer turn a blind eye to the danger that these facilities pose to the public and launched the biggest seizure of wild animals in New York’s history.

Most states ban the private possession of lions and tigers, but exempt anyone with a USDA license.  That license is far too easy to get and nearly impossible to have revoked, but conditions were so bad at Zeus’ former home that the license had been cancelled and it took the combined efforts of IFAW and a number of sanctuaries to place all of the big cats, bears and wolves.

The day he was rescued, after months of starving, Zeus RAN down the length of his cage, chasing Big Cat Rescue’s Operations Manager, who was racing (outside the cage) toward the beast wagon with a piece of meat. He would do anything for just a morsel of food, so loading him took no time at all.  Zeus was less than half the weight he should have been and his coat was ragged from the poor diet and filthy conditions.

As soon as Zeus arrived at Big Cat Rescue he knew he had found paradise.  While the other tigers were being unloaded at the sanctuary, Zeus checked out his pool, all of the space, toys and great napping spots.  He has been ever so grateful to his keepers and a joy to be around.  It is because of people like you that Zeus will never go hungry again.

Read about the rescue and watch the videos here:  http://bigcatrescue.org/jnk/

 

 

When Big Cat Rescue saved Zeus the tiger from starving to death at a backyard zoo a few months ago, we knew that he would need a lot of vet care to bring him back to health, but first we had to fatten him up enough that he would survive the surgeries.  Today we neutered him and began the process to try and save whatever vision he has left.  We are forever grateful to YOU, our viewers, and our wonderful vet team, including Dr. Tammy Miller, Dr. Liz Wynn, Dr. Justin Boorstein, Dr. Petterson & crew.

Zeus Goes on Vacation!

ZeusTigerVacation

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Thank you everyone who make these kinds of days possible.

 

 

Mickey

Mickey

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Mickey

Male Cougar
Born 6/25/2003
Rescued 8/18/2014

Mickey-Cougar_8884406477542209217_n

Please help provide for his long term recovery:   http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Please help provide for his long term recovery:   http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 

 

Mickey Cougar’s story is so long and heartbreaking that it will be hard to tell in just a few minutes.  (Watch his rescue video to find out the whole story.)

Animal House, in Moulton, AL, was a backyard zoo that operated with a USDA license up until 2006 when it was revoked.  At the time Alabama had no laws to regulate the private possession of wild animals, so once USDA washed their hands of the mess, there was virtually no government oversight of the facility.  Former volunteers say the owner had no other source of income than her social security check and that she had contracted with the county to become their dog pound.

In 2013 conditions there were reported to be so grim that the county revoked her contract and rescue groups went in to save the dogs and cats housed at Animal House.  One of the rescuers video taped a leopard who had been injured by a Doberman, two years prior, and sent the photos and video to Big Cat Rescue asking for help.

We were told that the owner had been feeding the dogs and cats there to her wild animals and that the Doberman had fought back.  Her family said the dog had just been in an adjacent cage and the leopard reached through.  Regardless of whether it was malice or neglect, the leopard’s leg had bones sticking out and festering tissue exposed.  Big Cat Rescue tried, unsuccessfully, for months, to get USDA, the USFWS, the State of Alabama and the local Sheriff to either confiscate the leopard or get her medical attention.  When they failed to help the cat we appealed to the media, who said there wasn’t a story if they couldn’t get permission to go film the cat themselves, which the owner was NOT going to allow.

The leopard died and had probably suffered unimaginable agony for two years or more until her wounds killed her.

We never gave up and 2014 began negotiations with the owner, her family members and the state department of natural resources to rescue the cats who still were being kept there.  When we saw the condition Mickey Cougar was in, we didn’t know if he would make it at all.

Both of his back knees suffered from torn ligaments so that when he walked the bones on top would just roll and slip off the bottom bones.  It was painful to even look at him.  Despite the fact that he was grossly underweight and had almost no muscle mass we had to make the difficult decision to sedate him to evaluate the damage and then again to try and repair it.

Dr. Hay, an orthopedic specialist, did the surgery, using something like a synthetic ligament mesh, to mend back his first leg.  Dr. Wynn used a new technique of spinning the patient’s own blood and harvesting platelet rich plasma, to quicken healing, which was injected into the other knee.   We had to reduce the size of Mickey’s cage, so he takes it easy while he is healing.  We will probably have to go back and do surgery on the injected knee once the first one has healed.

Meanwhile Mickey seems to have a strong will to live and we are going to give him every chance possible at a happy life.

Update Feb 22, 2016

MickeyCougar-BCR-playful

Mickey-Cougar_9138

 

 

Mickey Update Oct. 15, 2014

I can’t even look at Mickey without tearing up because he is at once, both so pitiful and yet so determined to overcome. We knew it would cost a lot to try and fix him.

For the past week or so, Mickey has been getting rehab treatments, to encourage him to use the leg and build up some muscle. It is Mickey’s nature to have two speeds: Laying around and full out running for the dinner plate. The twice a day rehab work gives him food treat rewards for walking slowing and deliberately.

Mickey-Cougar

We can see a pronounced improvement in the leg that was repaired, as he can keep the knee in place much better, but because of his lack of strength, from nearly starving to death in Alabama, and having no muscle, he trips over his back feet.

We film some of these sessions so the vet can see his progress and have shared some of them online, but it hurts to watch.

Dr. Hay visited the sanctuary recently, to see the rehab session himself. He said at Mickey’s current pace he thinks the surgically repaired knee should be strong enough that he can operate on the other side in 3 to 6 months.

 

Every day it is touch and go with Mickey because he needs to let the repair heal fully, and thus distribute his weight to the repaired leg and the one that still slides all over the place. Too much reliance on the repaired leg and it could damage the work done and never heal right and too much reliance on the broken knee, and his muscles on the other side will continue to atrophy.

Everything has its side effects, so even the pain meds have to be very carefully monitored, as too much can make him nauseous or cause him to sleep all the time and too little can make him not want to move at all.

Whenever there are cats in need of rescue, we always offer to take the oldest, sickest or most impaired because our sanctuary is unique in its ability to provide the best veterinary and supportive care. We have 2 vets that have been with us for about a decade each. They visit twice a week and provide all of the house calls for free.

Mickey-Cougar

We have specialists in orthopedics, eyes, cancer and teeth who dramatically discount their work because they love the big cats. We have 14 paid staff, who do administrative work and manage our 80-100 volunteers who put in the collective hours of 40 more paid staff. By spending the time and money to train expert volunteers, our donors’ money can go directly to the cats.

The reason we can provide such excellent care is because people like you care. It is your donations that keep the food coming every night, the medications on time, the emergency care and the ability to take in other cats like Mickey, who wouldn’t have a chance anywhere else.

 

Mickey-Cougar_9154 Mickey-Cougar_9200 Mickey-Cougar_9202 Mickey-Cougar_9258

Mickey-Cougar-Moving-01

 Mickey Cougar Update March 6, 2015

 

Mickey Cougar

Mickey Cougar 2015

Mickey Cougar was rescued in 2014. He was in such bad shape that we weren’t sure if we should try to fix everything that was wrong with him, or put him out of his misery. This video does not seem to have ever been posted, as it was 40 minutes long and 6GB in size. It’s been cut down to 12 minutes and shows the horrible decisions we often have to make.

Check out our main YouTube channel at BigCatTV.com and our website at BigCatRescue.org