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Poisonous Plants

POISONOUS PLANTS

Cats will eat things that could kill them.

 

THE FIVE PLANTS MOST HAZARDOUS TO YOUR PET’S HEALTH
“We typically recommend that pets not be allowed to eat plants in general,” says APCC veterinary toxicologist Dr. Safdar Khan. “However, it is especially critical that the following plants be kept out of reach of animals, as they have the potential to cause serious, even fatal systemic effects when ingested.”

* LILIES rank number one in dangerous plant call volume at the APCC, and are highly toxic to cats. Says Khan, “It is clear that even with ingestions of very small amounts, severe kidney damage could result.” An owner in Pennsylvania lost her cat to kidney failure from ingesting only a small portion of an Easter lily.

* AZALEAS, indigenous to many eastern and western states and commonly used in landscaping, contain substances that can produce vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, weakness, and central nervous system depression. Severe cases could lead to death from cardiovascular collapse.

* Frequently used as an ornamental plant, OLEANDER contains toxic components that can cause irritation of the gastrointestinal tract, hypothermia, and potentially severe cardiac problems.

* Also a popular ornamental plant, SAGO PALM can potentially produce vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures, liver failure, and even death. One pit bull terrier in Florida became ill and subsequently died from liver failure after chewing on the leaves and base of a sago palm in his yard.

* Although all parts of the CASTOR BEAN plant are dangerous, the seeds contain the highest concentration of toxins. Ingestion can produce significant abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness; in severe cases, dehydration, tremors, seizures, and even death could result.

Some plants are only toxic in certain of their components or under certain circumstances. This list does not include all plants that have poisonous effects and you should contact your Veterinarian before allowing your exotic to come in contact with any plant. Contact with these plants may be indicated by a rash on the skin or mouth, drooling, sore lips or a swollen tongue:

Any Ivy Drunk Cane Parlor Ivy Saddle Leaf
Arrowhead Vine Emerald Duke Pathos Spider Mum
Boston Ivy Heart Leaf Philodendrum Split Leaf
Chrysanthemum Majesty Poinsettia Weeping Fig
Colodium Marble Queen Pot Mum
Creeping Fig Nethysis Red Princess

These toxic plants may cause vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, abdominal pain, tremors, convulsions, hallucinations, heart palpitations and breathing and kidney problems:

 

Alfalfa
Almond tree
Alocasia
Amaryllis
American Yew
Angel’s Trumpet
Apple Seeds
Apricot Pits
Arrowgrass
Asparagus
Avacado
Azalea
Balsam Pear
Baneberry
Bayonet
Beargrass
Beech
Belladonna
Bird Of Paradise
Bittersweet
Black Locust
BlackEyed Susan
Bleeding Heart
Bloodroot
Bluebonnet
Boxwood
Buckeyes
Burning Bush
Buttercup
Cactus, Candelabra
Caladium
Castor Bean
Cherry Laurel
Cherry Tree/ pits
China Berry
Christmas Rose
Clematis
Coriaria
Cornflower
Corydalis
Creeping Charlie
Crocus, Autumn
Crown of Thorns
Cyclamen
Daffodil Daphne
Daphne
Datura
Deadly N ightshade
Death Camas
Delphinium
Dicentrea
Dieffengagachia
Dologeton
Dumb Cane
Dutchman Breech
Easter Lily
Eggplant
Elderberry
Elephant Ears
English Holly
Euonymus
Evergreen
Ferns
Flax
Four O Clock
Foxglove
Glocal Ivy
Golden Chain
Golden Glow
Gopher Purge
Hemlock
Henbane
Hollebore
Holly
Honeysuckle
Horse Chestnut
Horsebeans
Horsebrush
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Indian Tobacco
Iris
Ivy (all)
Jack In the Pulpit
Japanese Plum
Jasmine
Java Beans
Jerusalem Cherry
Jessamine
Jimson Weed
Jonquil
Jungle Trumpets
Lantana
Larkspur
Laurel
Lily
Lily of Valley
Lily Spider
Loco Weed
Lupine
Marigold
Marijuana
Matrimony Vine
May Apple
Mescal Bean
Mistletoe
Mock Orange
Monkey Pod
Monkshood
Moonseed
Morning Glory
Mountain Laurel
Mushrooms
Narcissus
Needlepoint Ivy
Nightshade
Nutmeg
Nux Vomica
Oleander
Rain Tree
Rhododendren
Rhubarb
Ripple Ivy
Rosary Pea
Rubber Plant
Scotch Broom
Skunk Cabbage
Snow on Mountain
Snowdrops
Spider Mum
Spinach
Sprangeri Fern
Staggerweed
Star Of Bethlehem
Sweetpea
Tansy Mustard
Tobacco
Tomato
Tulip
Tung Tree
Umbrella Plant
Virginia Creeper
Water Hemlock
Western Yew
Wild Call
Wild Cherry
Wisteria
Yews (all)

Note: I am not a veterinarian. If your exotic cat has ingested a toxic plant please consult a licensed veterinarian.

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1 Comment

  1. Excellent information about plants toxic to pets!