Cat Chat 34

Cat Chat 34

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Robin Greenwood, President of Elmira’s Wildlife Sanctuary joins Carole Baskin on Cat Chat 34 today.  Robin is both the Founder of the sanctuary and the President and talks with us today about how Elmira’s was started, their evolution and their future plans.

 

 

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Elmiras Aerial View

Elmiras Big Cat Play Area

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108_0792108_0854CatChat34RobinGreenwoodCat on fence post

Raptor Show Ends at Zoo When Big Cat Eats Owl

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It is a scene played out in thousands of gardens every day…albeit on a rather smaller scale.

But when a cat caught and devoured a bird at a zoo, it caused pandemonium among visitors.

In this case it was a lion that ate a barn owl which had become “spooked” during a falconry display and flown out of the arena.

The unfortunate bird, a female called Ash, had been left dazed and disoriented after clattering into a window.

She landed unsteadily in a couple of other spots before swooping down to a ledge in the lion enclosure.

The bird then appears to have lost her footing and was clubbed out of the air by a lioness before a male pounced and made short work of her as screaming zoo visitors looked on.

Staff at Colchester Zoo in Essex quickly moved in but were unable to prevent Ash’s untimely death.

Gavin Duthie, who witnessed the gruesome scene with his two-year-old son Daniel, said: “He was in tears, along with most of the people who were there. Women and children were screaming but it was all over in seconds.

“It’s in the lion’s nature. I have taught Daniel that lions are not fluffy animals. He was very upset but we will be back in the zoo again.”

The drama took place on Saturday afternoon as dozens of visitors gathered around the falconry arena.

The owl, who was nine and might have lived for up to 20 years in captivity, is believed to have been frightened by a noise or a camera flash and veered into a nearby window.

She then flew on to the roof of a meerkat enclosure before entering the lion’s habitat, where she lost her footing and was swiped by a waiting paw.

Moments later she was swallowed up by another of the big cats, five-year-old Bailey, whose diet were he on the African plains would be more likely to include wildebeest, zebras or buffalo.

It was no contest between the 8ft, 550lb king of the jungle and the 19oz barn owl – also known in folklore as the Death Owl.

The crowd was moved on and the area closed off as zoo keepers tried to restore order. Ash was one of a handful of barn owls that had been bred in captivity at Colchester.

Describing the bird’s final moments, the zoo’s marketing director Alex Downing said yesterday: “Although she landed on the side of the enclosure, she very sadly lost her footing and fell in, whereupon she was killed by one of the lions.” She added: “Everyone is obviously extremely upset about such a combination of events.

“But there is nothing that anyone could have done at the time to avoid such an awful outcome.

“In 25 years of falconry displays a fatality has never occurred as the birds do normally instinctively know that this isn’t a safe place to go. Unfortunately, we can only assume that it was because she was dazed that she flew across the enclosure.”

Last year horrified visitors to Chessington World of Adventure in Surrey witnessed a bearcat cub being ripped apart by a pair of lions.

Two of the cute mammals climbed a tree from some overhanging branches before landing in the neighbouring lion enclosure.

The second cub hid in some undergrowth but died from fright shortly afterwards. – Daily Mail

 

http://www.iol.co.za/news/world/horror-at-the-zoo-1.1225083

 

It is a scene played out in thousands of gardens every day…albeit on a rather smaller scale.

But when a cat caught and devoured a bird at a zoo, it caused pandemonium among visitors.

In this case it was a lion that ate a barn owl which had become “spooked” during a falconry display and flown out of the arena.

The unfortunate bird, a female called Ash, had been left dazed and disoriented after clattering into a window.

She landed unsteadily in a couple of other spots before swooping down to a ledge in the lion enclosure.

The bird then appears to have lost her footing and was clubbed out of the air by a lioness before a male pounced and made short work of her as screaming zoo visitors looked on.

Staff at Colchester Zoo in Essex quickly moved in but were unable to prevent Ash’s untimely death.

Gavin Duthie, who witnessed the gruesome scene with his two-year-old son Daniel, said: “He was in tears, along with most of the people who were there. Women and children were screaming but it was all over in seconds.

“It’s in the lion’s nature. I have taught Daniel that lions are not fluffy animals. He was very upset but we will be back in the zoo again.”

The drama took place on Saturday afternoon as dozens of visitors gathered around the falconry arena.

The owl, who was nine and might have lived for up to 20 years in captivity, is believed to have been frightened by a noise or a camera flash and veered into a nearby window.

She then flew on to the roof of a meerkat enclosure before entering the lion’s habitat, where she lost her footing and was swiped by a waiting paw.

Moments later she was swallowed up by another of the big cats, five-year-old Bailey, whose diet were he on the African plains would be more likely to include wildebeest, zebras or buffalo.

It was no contest between the 8ft, 550lb king of the jungle and the 19oz barn owl – also known in folklore as the Death Owl.

The crowd was moved on and the area closed off as zoo keepers tried to restore order. Ash was one of a handful of barn owls that had been bred in captivity at Colchester.

Describing the bird’s final moments, the zoo’s marketing director Alex Downing said yesterday: “Although she landed on the side of the enclosure, she very sadly lost her footing and fell in, whereupon she was killed by one of the lions.” She added: “Everyone is obviously extremely upset about such a combination of events.

“But there is nothing that anyone could have done at the time to avoid such an awful outcome.

“In 25 years of falconry displays a fatality has never occurred as the birds do normally instinctively know that this isn’t a safe place to go. Unfortunately, we can only assume that it was because she was dazed that she flew across the enclosure.”

Last year horrified visitors to Chessington World of Adventure in Surrey witnessed a bearcat cub being ripped apart by a pair of lions.

Two of the cute mammals climbed a tree from some overhanging branches before landing in the neighbouring lion enclosure.

The second cub hid in some undergrowth but died from fright shortly afterwards. – Daily Mail

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2094372/Essexs-Colchester-Zoo-barn-owl-demonstration-ends-lion-EATS-bird-prey.html

 

Circus Life…”Captive” Entertainment

Circus Life…”Captive” Entertainment

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Circus Life…”Captive” Entertainment

 

 

Circus Life…Step Right up to the Greatest Show of Exploitation on Earth!

USDA only requires that a cage for a wild animal be large enough that the animal be able to stand and turn around in the cage.

They allow even smaller enclosures for the purpose of travel….

Big Cats can be confined to cages that are too small to even stand up and turn around in for up to 60 days. If the cat is let out into the ring to perform, or into an exercise yard, then the 60 days starts over.

Animal abusers use this loop hole to confine their animals in cages that don’t even meet USDA’s minimum cage requirements by saying that they let the animals out for exercise to perform when there is no way to monitor their compliance.

Most facilities that house exotic cats are inspected once a year or less so there is no one there to see if the cats are spending more than 60 days at a time confined to circus wagons.

Germany: Lynx recuperates after head surgery

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Luchsin Pamina ist wieder auf den Beinen

Von Holger Schlegel

Luchsin Pamina ist wieder auf den Beinen

BAD HARZBURG. Sie ist der Star des Luchs-Schaugeheges an den Rabenklippen. Und deshalb war im Sommer die Anteilnahme groß, als der zahmen Luchsdame Pamina eine lebensgefährliche Operation bevorstand. Wie ernst es um sie stand, zeigt die Tatsache, dass sie erst dieser Tage wieder wirklich auf dem Damm ist.

Schon lange Zeit hatte Pamina gesundheitliche Probleme gehabt, sie taumelte und zeigte Ausfallerscheinungen. Im Sommer dann bekamen Ole Anders, Luchsbeauftragter des Nationalparks, und Melanie Nehring, die Biologin, die Pamina per Hand aufgezogen hatte, die traurige Nachricht: die dreijährige Luchskatze hatte eine Wucherung im Kopf, die aufs Gehirn drückte.

Zum Glück nahm sich die Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover Paminas an – die schwere Operation wurde als Forschungsprojekt eingestuft, die Kosten übernahm die Klinik.

Bei der Operation wurde Pamina eine Knochenwucherung aus dem Kopf entfernt, die aufs Gehirn drückte. Aber der Eingriff musste mit Rücksicht auf das Leben des Tieres mittendrin abgebrochen werden. Und niemand wusste, ob schon genug von der Wucherung herausgeschnitten worden war.

Es begann eine bange Wartezeit. Doch Pamina erholte sich. Langsam zwar, aber erkennbar. In dieser Woche konnte die Krankenakte von Pamina wirklich zugeklappt werden. Ole Anders ließ die Katze endgültig ins große Gehege.

Zu einhundert Prozent sei das Tier zwar noch nicht wieder hergestellt, bei genauem Hinschauen erkenne man noch die eine oder andere Unsicherheit in der Bewegung. Und ob die Beeinträchtigungen bleiben, könne man nicht sagen. Aber Sorgen braucht sich nun keiner mehr zu machen.

http://www.goslarsche.de/gz/news_co/harznews/?date=2009-10-16&title=Luchsin%20Pamina%20ist%20wieder%20auf%20den%20Beinen&id=15124&showit=yes

————

Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org

Cougar cubs settle in at Calif. wildlife center

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Petaluma cougar cubs redeem their image

By SEAN TROTT,
ARGUS-COURIER INTERN

Published: Friday, June 19, 2009 at 1:50 p.m.
Last Modified: Friday, June 19, 2009 at 1:50 p.m.

The adopting of lost, feral animals has been a trend among hospitable families for longer than many people realize. However, the Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue has stepped up the idea several notches by taking in two orphaned mountain lion cubs.

Organization volunteers hope that this will yield several positive results, including a new perspective on the lives mountain lions lead. Besides saving two cubs that otherwise would be forced to try and survive in the wild, the organization’s efforts involve working toward a better understanding of the creatures that many fear.

Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, the non-profit group that has adopted the cubs, is “dedicated to the rescue of injured and orphaned wildlife to promote understanding and appreciation.”

Doris Duncan, the executive director of the organization, took charge of the matter after the two cubs were brought to the organization by the Department of Fish & Game.

According to Duncan, the mountain lions are going to live out the rest of their lives in what she refers to as “natural isolation.” Though they will not be released to the wild, they will live in a habitat created specifically to mirror the one that they would normally inhabit.

Letting them go is not an option because they are far too young and weak to survive in the wild without a mother. Kyla, the female cub, has a broken front left leg, and Kuma, the male, had his whole left paw amputated. Both are certain to require additional medical assistance in the future, which is why they will live in a human-made enclosure in Petaluma, made complete with an artificial creek. There is even a lookout tower and feeding area, which the cubs are locked in while the workers clean the enclosure. The now 9-month-old cubs are fed once a day on a diet consisting of deer and quail.

In the wild, mountain lions normally stay in their family group for about two years, so the cubs’ learning time was abruptly cut short. Still, Duncan and other agency officials hope that the animals can learn enough about hunting prey so that they can have as close to a normal existence as possible. Normality in captivity is unattainable, however, and the cubs can never be released into the wild.

The organization hopes that these cubs can prove society’s misconceptions about mountain lions wrong. Statistics prove that these admittedly dangerous creatures much prefer deer and quail over humans. Much of the unfounded fear of them stems from a lack of understanding, which the Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue aims to amend.

Though caution must obviously be exercised around these lethal animals, they are not the ruthless killers that society portrays them to be, according to Duncan.

(Contact Sean Trott at argus@arguscourier.com)

http://www.petaluma360.com/article/20090619/COMMUNITY/906199932/1362?Title=Petaluma-cougar-cubs-redeem-their-image-

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org