Today at Big Cat Rescue Oct 16

Today at Big Cat Rescue Oct 16

Today at Big Cat Rescue Oct 16

Nosey Nirvana the ocelot at Big Cat Rescue

Nosey Nirvana the ocelot at Big Cat Rescue

Nirvana gives Honey a profile view and says, "This is my best side"

Nirvana gives Honey a profile view and says, "This is my best side"

 

 

Draft of future expansion of Big Cat Rescue and some of our awards

Draft of future expansion of Big Cat Rescue and some of our awards

Bengali demonstrates, "what a kid'll do to get to the middle of a..."

Bengali demonstrates, "what a kid'll do to get to the middle of a..."

Honey uses new iPhone 4S to snap gorgeous shot of Max the bobcat

Honey uses new iPhone 4S to snap gorgeous shot of Max the bobcat

Jamie and Justin come in on a Sunday to build Pharaoh white serval a throne

Jamie and Justin come in on a Sunday to build Pharaoh the white serval a throne

Donated artwork.  Painting of Cheetah.

Donated artwork. Painting of Cheetah.

Aspen Echo the Cougar Having Pumpkin Fun at Big Cat Rescue

Most Indian circuses disregard ban on using big cats

This circus still has a tusk force

Express Features
First Published : 22 Dec 2009 07:33:58 AM IST
Last Updated : 22 Dec 2009 10:33:12 AM IST

BANGALORE: Your ‘favourite’ (or so they claim) Gemini Circus is back in the city.

And so are the elephants.

Wondering what happened to the recent notification according to which the elephants cannot be kept in zoos? Mind you, the definition of zoos includes circus also in the Wildlife Protection Act.

What about Bollywood bimbette Celina Jaitley’s sincere attempts to save these elephants in captivity? “After coming to Mumbai and visiting other parts of India, I have seen so many elephants who are kept in such bad conditions in captivity. I think PETA has taken a very good step, and I am proud to be associated with this cause,” she made a serious comment.

Obviously, it’s then surprising to see these elphants dancing to the tunes of its trainer in the city circus.

An insider, not wanting to be quoted for obvious reasons, said, “It’s only in India that this kind of tamasha happens. You go to any part of the world and will find all kinds of animals in circuses.” When asked about the legal angle to his side of the story, the man, sounding really angry, said, “They’ve taken all other animals — tigers, lions, cheetah and monkeys — we’ve still not got any official notice about the use of elephants.” “The Performing Animals Rules prohibit the use of few animals in circus. According to the rule, lions, tigers, monkey and panthers should not be used in the circus, however, elephants are not included in the rules,” Brinda Nanda, the Animal Rights Advocate.

The recent notification regarding prohibition of keeping animals in zoos did not come into force because the Centre has yet to make rules regarding proper accommodation of the elephants, added Brinda.

Till then, it’s still not such a ‘big’ issue for circus owners, as someone closely watching this circus (pun intended) from inside pointed it out: “Of course, our business will suffer if we have to give away these elephants but there’s nothing much we can do about it. We take care of these animals like no one else and deserve them more than anyone else.” What do you have to say? YOUR ‘favourite’ (or so they claim) Gemini Circus is back in the city.

And so are the elephants.

Wondering what happened to the recent notification according to which the elephants cannot be kept in zoos? Mind you, the definition of zoos includes circus also in the Wildlife Protection Act.

What about Bollywood bimbette Celina Jaitley’s sincere attempts to save these elephants in captivity? “After coming to Mumbai and visiting other parts of India, I have seen so many elephants who are kept in such bad conditions in captivity. I think PETA has taken a very good step, and I am proud to be associated with this cause,” she made a serious comment.

Obviously, it’s then surprising to see these elphants dancing to the tunes of its trainer in the city circus.

An insider, not wanting to be quoted for obvious reasons, said, “It’s only in India that this kind of tamasha happens. You go to any part of the world and will find all kinds of animals in circuses.” When asked about the legal angle to his side of the story, the man, sounding really angry, said, “They’ve taken all other animals — tigers, lions, cheetah and monkeys — we’ve still not got any official notice about the use of elephants.” “The Performing Animals Rules prohibit the use of few animals in circus. According to the rule, lions, tigers, monkey and panthers should not be used in the circus, however, elephants are not included in the rules,” Brinda Nanda, the Animal Rights Advocate.

The recent notification regarding prohibition of keeping animals in zoos did not come into force because the Centre has yet to make rules regarding proper accommodation of the elephants, added Brinda.

Till then, it’s still not such a ‘big’ issue for circus owners, as someone closely watching this circus (pun intended) from inside pointed it out: “Of course, our business will suffer if we have to give away these elephants but there’s nothing much we can do about it. We take care of these animals like no one else and deserve them more than anyone else.” What do you have to say?

PLAYING THE WILD CARD

* There are laws designed to protect animals in circuses. They include

* The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act of 1960 (PCA Act)

* The Performing Animals (Registration) Rules of 2001 under the PCA Act

* The Wild Life Protection Act of 1972 (WLPA) (as amended in 1991)

* The International C.I.T.E.S. (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) treaty that protects endangered animals and provisions under the Indian constitution.

* But the laws are rarely enforced. Officials look the other way when circuses come to town.

* The former union Minister of Social Justice and Empowerment, Maneka Gandhi, banned the use of bears, monkeys, tigers, lions and panthers in circuses in October 1998.

* Still, most circuses in India disregard this law. Some circuses refuse to give up the banned animals and demand financial compensation even though they are breaking the law.

Source: www.petaindia.com

http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/story.aspx?Title=This+circus+still+has+a+tusk+force&artid=xumP2tQi%7CP0=&SectionID=Qz/kHVp9tEs=&MainSectionID=Qz/kHVp9tEs=&SEO=&SectionName=UOaHCPTTmuP3XGzZRCAUTQ==

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org

N.Z. facility’s cheetah cubs survive early setback

Park’s cheetah cubs flourish after early setback

By SAM SACHDEVA – The Press
Last updated 05:00 19/12/2009

Orana Wildlife Park’s abandoned cheetah cubs are now bigger and bolder and about to mark their first Christmas together.

When Cango, Shomari, Kunjuka and Mazza were rejected by their mother shortly after their birth in April, park keepers had to work around the clock to ensure their survival.

Exotic mammals head keeper Graeme Petrie said the animals were thriving.

“They’re putting on a lot of weight and conditioning. I’ll come back after a weekend and you can just see the growth in them.”

While the keepers initially had to feed, toilet and clean the cubs, he said, their work now consisted of ensuring they got enough exercise and had a proper diet.

Tennis balls, sticks and frisbees kept the cheetahs entertained, while their meals consisted mainly of horse meat, with a weekly treat of chicken.

Petrie said each cheetah was a “totally different cat”, having developed distinct personality traits.

“The little madam [Mazza] is a bit of a stirrer. Cango’s the biggest of the three boys and he’s quite relaxed. Shomari is No2 and Kunjuka’s the smallest, so he can be more aggressive.”

Petrie said a “girlfriend” for the males would arrive from Africa in February.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/cutestuff/3178336/Parks-cheetah-cubs-flourish-after-early-setback

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org

Miss World contestants pose with lion cubs, cheetahs in South Africa

NOTE: Learn more about the “play with cubs” industry in South Africa here: http://www.lionrescue.org.za/playwithcubs.htm

Gibraltar’s Kaiane Aldorino named new Miss World at glittering pageant

By: NKEMELENG NKOSI
Associated Press
12/12/09 11:38 PM PST JOHANNESBURG

JOHANNESBURG — Kaiane Aldorino from Gibraltar was named the new Miss World at a glittering two-hour pageant that put South Africa in the spotlight and featured traditional dancers and drummers.

The leggy brunette, dressed in white-lace evening gown, was crowned as silver confetti rained down onstage around her. She clapped her hands to her mouth when her name was announced.

“I have no words,” she said when asked to describe how she felt. “I am really happy.”

The 23-year-old administrative clerk from the British territory on the tip of the Iberian peninsula was a crowd favorite after winning the swimsuit competition.

She joined seven other contestants in the final round of the show. The loudest cheers were reserved for Miss South Africa, Tatum Keshwar who was the second runner-up.

First runner-up was Miss Mexico, Perla Beltran Acosta.

Aldorino did not give an indication of what her immediate plans were now that she had won the prestigious title.

“I will try to do the best that I can now that I have opportunity and advantage,” she said in a brief interview with The Associated Press after the event.

Gibraltar, known as The Rock, is a quirky, multicultural British outpost of 30,000 people, most of whom speak perfect Spanish and even own property along Spain’s southern Mediterranean coast. An estimated 12,000 people cross over from Spain daily to work and many more to visit.

Spain ceded sovereignty of Gibraltar to Britain in a 1713 treaty, but has persistently sought its return, claiming the territory as a natural and historic part of its geography. The outcropping is in the Strait of Gibraltar, for centuries a strategic waterway linking the Atlantic and the Mediterranean.

Wearing her crown of tiny jeweled blue flowers, Aldorino said had been impressed with South Africa, which was hosting its seventh Miss World final.

“It has a lot to offer,” she said.

South Africa is taking advantage of the world’s attention as the country gears up to host the World Cup in June.

Saturday’s show, which was televised across the world, gave a taste of South Africa’s rich cultural heritage and natural attractions.

The 112 contestants were welcomed at the start by Zulu dancers and the ululating African female performers. There were clips from the finalists time in South Africa — showing the beauties cuddling cheetahs and lions, on pristine white beaches and even playing soccer.

“It is a wonderful opportunity for South Africa to showcase that they can host a world-class event and also a great tourist opportunity to show off the best that South Africa has in store,” Keshwar said.

http://www.sfexaminer.com/world/gibraltars-kaiane-aldorino-named-new-miss-world-at-glittering-pageant-79155522.html

See more photos here: http://missworld.joburgtourism.com/default.asp?id=50

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org

H1N1 virus found in California cheetah

Safari West does not appear on the list of accredited facilities on the AZA website.

Swine Flu Found in California Cheetah

A California cheetah was the first in the world to come down with swine flu. Now scientists are studying how the big cat caught the virus and what this could mean for other zoo animals, pets and people.

By: Kelley Weiss

Wed Dec 9, 2009
(Sacramento, CA)

Nancy Lang says in the last twenty years she’s been running the Safari West Wildlife Preserve she’s seen animals get sick…but not with the flu.

“This is the first time, we were stunned.”

Lang is a biologist and owns Safari West near Napa. It houses 600 animals and is a combination of a zoo and resort. Lang says after she heard that a few domestic cats had swine flu she wanted to make sure her cheetahs were OK.

“I read about this in USA Today, I’ve been traveling a lot for business, and I came back and the cat was doing a little bit of coughing, its appetite wasn’t as good as it should be, so I requested that we get the swabs for swine flu and it came out positive.”

It’s not clear exactly how the cheetah came down with the H1N1 virus, but Lang says they think a sick employee infected the cat.

Marie Martinez is Safari West’s cat keeper – she’s at the “Cheetah Barn” where the four cheetahs stay.

“This is where we bring the cats in and this is where they’re housed in the evening, so they each have their own stalls, and you can see we’ve got the male to the back there and the little female.”

One of the females, Gijima, had the swine flu. Martinez helped nurse the eight-year-old cat back to health.

“It’s pretty much like a child at home, you know taking care of that kid, making sure they’re warm, are they drinking, are they eating? So that’s what you’re keeping an eye on and letting the vet know too, so that’s what we did with her.”

Martinez says Gijima has fully recovered – she was sick for about two weeks last month. She says no other animals at Safari West have shown flu-like symptoms. And visitors are not in danger of getting ill from the animals.

“When a cheetah anywhere has an influenza virus it’s a unique finding, this isn’t something we expected.”

Sharon Hietala is a professor and immunologist at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System at UC Davis. Hietala’s lab is part of a network of laboratories around the nation tracking H1N1 in animals.

“So as scientists we want to understand the transmission, how this happened and how we can protect other cats or other animals. So we’re at one right now, we don’t know anything and it’s a piece of the puzzle.”

And the American Veterinary Medical Association is also trying to understand how humans are passing swine flu to animals. Kimberly May is a vet with the association.

“We know that animals can give us diseases but we often forget that we can give them to them as well.”

May says a cheetah isn’t that far removed from a domestic cat. There have been seven confirmed cases of H1N1 in house cats around the country, none in California. May says it’s believed the animals caught the virus from their owners. But she says eventually animals could transmit the virus to humans.

“We know it’s crossed the species barrier one way, it’s not impossible to consider that it would go back. Luckily we don’t have any evidence that it has so far, but it’s not out of the realm of possibility.”

So May’s advice for zookeepers and pet owners at this point is to remember to protect animals from the virus too. May says it’s really just common sense if you’re sick: cover your cough or sneeze, wash your hands and avoid close contact with animals…as well as humans.

http://www.capradio.org/articles/articledetail.aspx?articleid=7469

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Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org