Today at Big Cat Rescue May 17 2013

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Today is Endangered Species Day

 

Today is Endangered Species Day. Take a moment today to enjoy the spectacular endangered pandas and polar bears on live cams. Learn more about elephantstigers, and gorillas. And celebrate the triumph of the ospreys with Rachel and Steve – once endangered, the osprey has made a steady comeback.

Never stop learning,

Charlie / explore.org

BCR Today 2013 May 15 Kansas Rescue Cats

 

 

BCR Today 2013 May 15 includes footage of the Kansas Rescue Cats enjoying their new life.

 

Bobcat-Lovey_1736 Canada-Lynx-Gilligan_1709 Canada-Lynx-Gilligan_1710 Canada-Lynx-Skipper_1624 Canada-Lynx-Skipper_1686 Canada-Lynx-Skipper_1689 Canada-Lynx-Skipper_1691 Canada-Lynx-Skipper_1708 Caracal-Rose_1468 Cats-Tigger_1702

 

Volunteers-Moving-Cleo-Serval_1781 Volunteers-Moving-Cleo-Serval_1780 Volunteers-Moving-Cleo-Serval_1779 Serval-Ginger_1757 Serval-Ginger_1755 Serval-Ginger_1752 Kittens-Jamie-bobtail_1714 Lift-Truck_1704 Kittens_1662 News-Fox_1635 Rescue-Empty-Carriers_1627 Siberian-Lynx-Natasha_1513 Siberian-Lynx-Natasha_1508 Tiger-SARMOTI_1495

Today at Big Cat Rescue May 17 2013

Save the Critically Endangered Indochinese Tiger

Save the Critically Endangered Indochinese Tiger

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Sign the petitionIUCN Headquarters

IUCN Conservation Centre, Rue Mauverney 28, 1196, Gland, Switzerland  mail@iucn.org  Phone:+41 22 9990000 Fax:+41 22 9990002

 

Asia Regional Office

63, Soi Prompong, Sukhumvit Soi 39, Wattana, 10110 Bangkok, Thailand  asia@iucn.org  Phone: +66 2 6624032  Fax: +66 2 6624387  Fax: +66 2 6624388

 

Dead Indochinese Tigers

International Union for Conservation of Nature Headquarters, Asian Regional Office

The Indochinese tiger is a tiger subspecies found in Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and southwestern China. This tiger is disappearing faster than any other tiger sub-species with at least one tiger being killed each week by poachers.

All existing populations are at extreme risk from habitat loss, prey depletion, inbreeding, hunting for trophies, poaching by farmers, and the growing demand for tiger bones in Asian medicine. According to some reports, almost three-quarters of the Indochinese tigers killed end up in Chinese pharmacies for Chinese Traditional Medicines.

In Myanmar, a designated Protected Tiger Area was clear-cut for sugar and tapioca plantations. Cambodia continues illegal logging in tiger habitat. Fewer than 30 tigers are believed to be left in Vietnam, and one has not been seen in China since 2007 when the last surviving individual was eaten.

I ask to you move the status of the Indonesian Tiger to “Critically Endangered” and make more strenuous efforts to stop poaching and habitat loss for these apex predators, which will also benefit other animals in the region.

Sign the petition

78 tiger deaths so far in 2012

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2012 was a Bad Year for Tigers

New Delhi: Even as India is striving hard to save big cats, a total of 78 tigers have died so far this year with over half of them victims to poaching, parliament was informed Tuesday.

Environment Minister Jayanthi Natarajan told the Lok Sabha that of the 78 tigers, 50 were poached and 28 had died natural deaths.
The number of tiger deaths was highest in the last three years with 56 dying in 2011 followed by 53 and 66 tiger deaths in 2010 and 2009 respectively.

According to the 2010 tiger census, there are 1,706 tigers left in the wild in India.

 

http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/around-78-tiger-deaths-so-far-in-2012_814703.html
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Wildlife Board Says Tigers and All Endangered Species Need Protection

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New Delhi, Sep 30 — Tigers, lions and elephants in India get all the attention when it comes to protection. But all this may soon change as experts and environment ministry officials feel that other critically endangered animals require equal if not more focus.

 

 

This was proposed at a meeting of the National Board for Wildlife (NBWL) chaired by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh earlier this month. 

 

“One board member pointed out that not much attention is given to the other critically endangered species, including those on the verge of extinction,” a senior official in the environment ministry told IANS.

 

 

India’s environment ministry in 2011 came out with a detailed list of 57 critically endangered species, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, spiders and corals. I

US Leads the World in Exterminating Endangered Species

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Extinction Rates Are Biased And Much Worse Than You Thought

Today, passenger pigeons’ habitat consists of a few museum display cases around the U.S. Photo: edenpictures

Human activity—mostly habitat destruction and overhunting—has obliterated nearly 900 species over the past 500 years. Around 17,000 plants and animals are listed today on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of endangered species. According to the IUCN, one in eight birds, one in four mammals, one in five invertebrates, one in three amphibians and half of all turtles face extinction.

<em>The Guardian produced this guilt-inducing map (see the interactive version on their website) showing how the world’s countries fare when it comes to extinction counts:

Photo: The Guardian

For U.S. citizens, this looks particularly bad, while those in Vietnam, Kazakistan and Paraguay come off as innocent protectors of local wildlife. However, this map is inherently biased. These are only documented extinctions, after all. While the U.S. is undoubtedly skilled at bulldozing wetlands to build shopping malls and shooting passenger pigeons