Big Cat Fences

Big Cat Fences

Building Fences to Protect Big Cats

The Corbett Foundation is a charitable, non-profit and non-governmental organization solely committed to the conservation of wildlife. They work towards a harmonious coexistence between human beings and wildlife across some of the most important wildlife habitats in India, namely Corbett Tiger Reserve, Kanha and Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserves, Kaziranga Tiger Reserve and around the Greater Rann of Kutch. Local Communities and wildlife share natural ecosystems and this often raises conflict, so the health and wellbeing of these communities are often directly linked to their willingness to participate in wildlife conservation efforts. The Corbett foundation has implemented its programs in over 400 villages in the last decade.

tiger falls in well

One specific area the Corbett foundation is working on is the Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve. Open farm wells, dug by villagers, in the buffer zone of the Reserve, are proving to be a deathtrap for wild animals, with several cases having been reported of animals, including tigers and leopards, drowning by accidentally falling into the open wells. Currently around 2500 of these open farm wells exist, many in the core zone of the Tiger Reserve. The Corbett Foundation with the support of Exodus Travels Ltd UK, has initiated a project to install chain-link fencing around such open farm wells to prevent any further accidental drowning. In the first phase of the project, 200 fences have already been built around wells closest to the core of the reserve.

In March 2016, Big Cat Rescue donated $5,000 to assist with this initiative. The cost of one fence is 7500 Indian Rupees so approximately $111, meaning from the $5000 donated, between 40-45 fences can be built.

You can read more about the other great work done by Corbett Foundation here: http://www.corbettfoundation.org/what-we-do.php#wildlife-conservation

Building Fences to Save Big Cats with Corbett

Part of the problem in protecting big cats in range states is that they usually don’t even know what kind of animal they are.  This is a leopard in a well, not a tiger, but our fences would prohibit this from happening.

This is a lion, not a tiger, but you get the idea:

Find out more about in situ work being done by Big Cat Rescue at:  http://bigcatrescue.org/insitu

See more pictures of tigers, leopards and lions who have fallen in wells.

Leopard FallenInWell2016b

 

Sabre

Sabre

hear big cats

Sabre

Male Leopard

DOB 3/1/92

Rescued 7/20/95

Sabre-Leopard_6338554555157443821_n
Sabre was 3 years old when he arrived at Big Cat Rescue on 7/20/95. Though he was only supposed to be here temporarily, his former owner moved and left no forwarding address.

This could have been another sad ending as most are in the exotic pet world. Luckily, we had taken Sabre in and he will have a home here for life. He is very playful and fun loving and always has a mischievous look on his face. He loves to act very silly, running about his cat-a-tat and jumping on top of his mountain den.

Sabre the black leopardSabre, like many of our cats, has been relocated to new cat-a-tats a few times.  The change of scenery and new neighbors to interact with provide another form of enrichment for our big cats.  Sabre has enjoyed the time he has spent among other cougars, tigers, leopards and bobcats.  The only thing Sabre probably hasn’t enjoyed is his recent neutering.  But now he is back to his old energetic self loving his new location.

 

Sabre the Black Leopard Tumor Removal

 

Sabre the black leopard is 22 years old, which is about 10 years longer than most leopards live, but a tumor has begun to grow under his chin and could make it hard for him to swallow, so the difficult decision is made to remove the mass surgically.  The surgery could kill him, but the mass could too.  This is graphic surgery video so don’t watch if you have a weak constitution.

 

 

Black Panthers?

 

 

Sponsor Sabre http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Gorgeous Black Leopard Photo 2011

Gorgeous Black Leopard Photo 2011

 

Why isn’t this cat called a Black Panther?

Leopard Facts

Leopard Facts

Leopard

 

Common Name: Leopard
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata (Vertebrata)
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Felidae
Genus: Pantherinae Panthera
Species: pardus (asian)
Sub-species: (Not all listed, these are the most common)

 

Javan leopard – P.p. melas
Amur leopard – P.p. orientalis
Indian leopard – P.p. fusca
North Chinese leopard – P.p. japonensis
Somali leopard – P.p. nanopardus
Zanzibar leopard – P.p. adersi
Sinai leopard – P.p. jarvisi
Sri Lankan leopard – P.p. kotiya
Barbary leopard – P.p. panthera
Persian leopard – P.p. saxicolor
Arabian leopard – P.p. nimr
Anatolian leopard – P.p. tulliana
Caucasus leopard – P.p. ciscaucasica
Indochinese leopard – P.p. delacouri
African leopard – P.p. leopardus (pictured, spotted right)
Misc: This cat, in its melanistic color phase, is often mistakenly referred to as a black panther. This species has been (and is still) illegally hunted throughout its range for sport, and for its fur.

The leopard is capable of running just under 40 miles per hour for brief periods. It can leap more than 20 feet horizontally, and 10 feet vertically. It is also a very adept swimmer.

Size and Appearance: The leopard is the smallest member of the 4 “great cats” and most closely resembles its cousin the Jaguar. Leopards vary in length from 3 – 6.25 ft with a tail length of 22.5 – 43 inches, and stand 17.5 – 30.5 inches high at the shoulder.  Males weigh between 80 – 150 pounds and females between 62.5 – 100 pounds.  This spotted cat has short powerful limbs, heavy torso, thick neck, and long tail. Its short sleek coat varies greatly from pale straw and gray buff to bright, deep ochre and chestnut, and sometimes black (found mostly in wetter, dense forests). Large black spots grouped into rosettes on the shoulders, upper arms, back, flanks and haunches, and smaller scattered spots on the lower limbs, head, throat and chest, and the belly has large black blotches.

Habitat: The leopard can adapt to almost any type of habitat that provides it with sufficient food and cover, which excludes only the interior of large deserts. In its range, it is the only large predator in the rain forests.

Distribution: Throughout Africa, from the Arabian Peninsula through Asia to Manchuria and Korea.

 

Reproduction and Offspring: Leopards are capable of breeding between 2 and 3 years, and produce 1 – 3 cubs after a 90-100 day gestation. The cubs become independent between 13 – 18 months, and siblings may remain together for several months before separating. Females in captivity have produced offspring as old as 19 years, but the average age of last reproduction is 8.5 years.

In captivity, leopards have lived over 20 years, as compared to 10 – 11 in the wild.

Social System and Communication: Leopards are solitary cats, and use the same methods as the other cats for defining their territory: scent marking, feces, and scratch marks. It has a variety of vocalizations including grunting, growling, hissing and meowing. One of their most recognized sounds is their distance call which sounds something like someone sawing wood.

Hunting and Diet: Leopards are very opportunistic animals and have an extremely flexible diet. They will consume protein in almost any form, from beetles up to antelopes twice its own weight.  It readily eats carrion, and caches sizeable kills in trees, returning nightly to feed on them. Their main diet consists of over 30 different species including: medium sized antelopes (reedbuck, impala, Tommy’s gazelles) and the young of larger species (topi, hartebeest, wildebeest, zebra) as the primary food sources, with hares, birds and small carnivores rounding out the list. They have even been known to include the occasional baboon in their diet.

Status: CITES: Appendix I

Felid TAG recommendation: Leopard (Panthera pardus). International studbooks for five rare leopard subspecies (Amur, Persian, Chinese, Sri Lankan, and Arabian) have been maintained for as long as 25 years. On the basis of conservation need, space availability, and the potential for obtaining new founders, the Felid TAG has determined that there is only space for one race. The Amur leopard, P. p. orientalis of the Russian Far East, adjacent Manchuria and North Korea has been identified as the leopard for zoos and other North American institutions. Hybrids, other races and color morpho-types will be managed to extinction. The Amur leopard is managed via a PMP and includes AZA zoos, non-member zoos, and private owners as part of the program. The target population of 120 individuals probably will be increased to 150 to meet genetic and demographic objectives. The EEP and the PMP will merge soon to manage this species globally. The Russian Ministry of the Environment has initiated discussion about a potential release program in the Russian Far East.

How rare is this cat? The International Species Information Service lists 459 worldwide, with 195 being in the U.S.

 

 

 

Meet our leopard friends:

 

Leopards of BCR

 

http://bigcatrescue.org/catbio/