Liger Facts

Liger Facts

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Where do Ligers Come From?

Irresponsible breeders is the short answer.

A liger is the result of breeding a male lion to a tigress. A tigon is the result of breeding a male tiger to a lioness. Since lions and tigers do not exist in the same areas, this is not something that happens in the wild. It is done in captivity by disreputable carnies to produce a freak that ignorant people will pay to see. These cats suffer from many birth defects and usually die young. Because ligers are usually larger than either parent, it also puts the tigress at great risk in carrying the young and may require C-section deliveries or kill her in the process. When the public quits paying to see these unfortunate creatures, the evil people responsible for breeding them will stop this inhumane practice.

You can stop the abuse. Don’t support places, like T.I.G.E.R.S. and Jungle Island, that breed ligers. Bhagavan Antle who calls himself Doc Antle, the person you will most often see promoting this shameful practice, has gone to great lengths to stop us and the brave young girl who created the video at the bottom of the page, from letting you know the truth. Visit her YouTube site HERE and let her know you appreciate what she is doing to prevent the future breeding of ligers and tigons.

When you see ligers in the news or on TV, write the station and let the reporters know the truth about hybrids. You can send 5 letters at once to the media of your choice through our online email system at CatLaws.com

 

What does a liger look like?

 

Actually they aren’t this dramatic.  See real photos of ligers below.

Find out more about Big Cat Rescue’s liger and tiger rescue.

Read about the conviction of those involved in canned hunts in the US. They excuse their behavior by making the case that ligers and tigons are not protected by the Endangered Species Act. Now you know why so many of these sleazy back yard breeders are trying to produce more of them.

 

 

LIGERS and TIGONS

Video by a Big Cat AdvoCat. Visit her site: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKYILLEdy5s

Liger PhotoThe following story attempts to make it sound like there could be some reason to breed lions and tigers for public amusement, but anyone who cares about animals knows that this is a despicable thing to do because the cats have to spend their lives in deprivation and confinement and are genetically so unhealthy that they usually die young. The ONLY reason anyone breeds ligers is to create a freak that simple minded people will pay to see.

 

Ligers Make a “Dynamite” Leap Into the Limelight

 

by: Maryann Mott August 5, 2005

It’s half lion, half tiger, and completely real. Now thanks to a cameo in the 2004 cult movie Napoleon Dynamite, the liger has leaped into the limelight, prompting fans to ask, What are they really like?

The faintly striped, shaggy-maned creatures are the offspring of male lions and female tigers, which gives them the ability to both roar like lions and chuff like tigers-a supposedly affectionate sound that falls somewhere between a purr and a raspberry.

Weighing in at about a thousand pounds (450 kilograms) each, they typically devour 50 pounds (23 kilograms) of raw meat in a meal.

“For the most part they’re really laid back,” said Jason Hutcherson, vice president of Wild Animal Safari in Pine Mountain , Georgia . “They like to swim and play in the water.”

The drive-through wildlife park is believed to have the country’s largest concentration of ligers, housing ten of the massive cats.

Since 1999 the park has bred its male lion and female tiger many times, producing about 24 cubs.

Not all of them have been healthy, though.

LIger Picture“We’ve had 3 out of 24 that, for all practical purposes, were normal but developed as they grew older some kind of neurological disorder,” Hutcherson said.

Autopsies didn’t reveal what caused the cubs to develop “head shakes,” so park staff “chalked it up to a genetic defect,” Hutcherson said.

Accredited zoos frown on the practice of mixing two different species and have never bred ligers, says Jane Ballentine, a spokesperson for the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, based in Silver Spring , Maryland.

“Keeping the two species separate has always been standard procedure,” she said.

 

Wild Ligers?

 

Long before fans heard Napoleon claim that the liger is “pretty much my favorite animal,” there have been rumors of the hybrid’s existence in the wild.

Lion-tiger mating occurs in captivity. But it does not happen in the wild, probably for the same reason humans do not breed with gorillas or chimps.

“Crossing the species line” does not generally occur in the wild, because “it would result in diminished fitness of the offspring,” said Ronald Tilson, director of conservation at the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley.

Geography is another obstacle to natural lion-tiger mating. Wild tigers mainly inhabit Asia, whereas the lion’s current natural habitat is almost entirely in Africa.

The Gir National Forest in India is the only place in the world where tiger and lion ranges overlap, fueling speculation that wild ligers roamed the area hundreds of years ago.

Tilson doesn’t believe it.

“This would be highly improbable, because the Gir forest is really very dry and not optimal tiger habitat,” he said.

 

A Liger Named Patrick

 

Perched on the edge of the Mojave Desert near Los Angeles , California , a lone liger, named Patrick, lives at Shambala Preserve, which bills itself as “a haven for endangered exotic big cats.”

“The interesting thing about these animals is that they have the best qualities of the tiger and the best of the lion,” said movie actress and conservationist Tippi Hedren, who has run Shambala since 1972. “Those qualities manifest themselves in the fact that they like to be in the water [a tiger trait] and are very social [a lion trait].”

Many of the cats at the 80-acre (32-hectare) sanctuary are orphans or castoffs from circuses, zoos, and private owners who could no longer care for the animals.

ShambalaPatrick arrived at the sanctuary seven years ago after federal authorities shutdown the roadside zoo in Illinois where he lived.

The 800-pound (360-kilogram) liger was kept in such a small cage that his hind-leg muscles had started to atrophy, said Hedren, who starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds.

Patrick’s compound at Shambala allows him plenty of room for exercise. A stream runs through his compound, so his tiger half can play in the water or his lion half can stay out of it, whichever he chooses.

 

Liger in the Hills

 

Spirit of the Hills Wildlife Sanctuary in Spearfish, South Dakota , recently acquired a liger named Samson and 48 other big cats after federal authorities closed a Minnesota wildlife facility.

“Everyone who comes wants to see Samson,” said Trevor Smith, an environmental biologist and sanctuary board member.

The four-and-a-half-year-old hybrid tips the scales at over a thousand pounds (over 450 kilograms), and eats 30 to 50 pounds (14 to 23 kilograms) of raw meat every other day.

Liger at Big Cat Rescue

“Samson is really picky. He’ll only eat beef, elk, and venison,” Smith said. “We try and feed him chicken, like the other animals, but he won’t touch it. He’ll let it rot in the sun.”

The sanctuary-whose mission is to educate people about wild animals and emphasize that they don’t make good pets-has seen a surge in visitors since Samson’s arrival in June.

Much of the public’s curiosity about the liger stems from Napoleon Dynamite, Smith said.

Smith worries that Samson is “becoming too much of a freak show.”

If Samson had his way, Smith said, he’d sleep away the day inside, away from public view. 

“We’ve had a huge ethical debate at the sanctuary on whether or not we should lock him out of his shed,” Smith said. “But at the same time, he’s why the visitors are coming.”

 

 

Tigons and Ti-tigons

 

A tigon is the product of a male tiger and female lion. They receive growth inhibitor genes from both parents and so are smaller than either of them. They show much the same coloration of ligers except they sometimes have more distinct stripes. As with ligers the females are fertile whereas the males are sterile. They have the same vocalizations as liger, a sort of cross between lion and tiger. Ti-tigons speak tiger. Tigons are now rarer than ligers, but in the late 1800’s/early 1900’s tigons were more common.

Meet our past liger friend Freckles 

This lion and tiger had been raised together for the bad purpose of creating ligers.  The female was spayed and the male got a vasectomy upon arrival to Big Cat Rescue to ensure there would be no “accidents.”

 

Ligers in the News

 

Liger

liger

View “Liger” on Spundge

Big Cat Rescue does not condone the breeding of ligers.  These news stories are posted so that you can help us educate people as to why it is cruel to breed ligers and tigons.

 

 

 

Freckles the liger

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Freckels the Liger on top of her den

Freckles the Liger
DOB 1/1/93 -7/5/2011

Arrived at Big Cat Rescue 12/19/2008

Most ligers suffer from a condition called Giganticism where they grow to over a 1,000 lbs in the first couple years of life.

Since it is un natural for lions and tigers to cross breed (being that they are typically not on the same continent) the cubs are usually too large for the mother to deliver without a c-section and they die very young from a multitude of birth defects and due to the rapid growth.

Freckles only weighs  about the same as a lion and thus did not suffer from Giganticism.

Most ligers die before they are seven years old, but Freckles lived an extraordinarily long life.

Freckles the Liger Has Died

It always seems to be raining when a big cat has to be euthanized.  I guess it is the angels crying.  Crying for joy that another magnificent creature is finally freed of their chains and on their way home.

Even though it makes the task so much harder, at least the rain helps hide the trails of tears on our own cheeks as we bid our beloved ones good-bye.

Dr. Wynn pointed out that all of the work we did to try and save Freckle’s life was exactly a year ago and she got another good year of life from the effort.  Her neurological disease had progressed rapidly lately and we knew it was time to let her go.

Thank you for giving Freckles a safe place to spend her remaining years after being bounced from facility to facility before arriving here.

https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/freckles-liger  is the memorial page Julie Hanan has set up for you to post your memories of Freckles.  Due to space issues the site isn’t allowing the posting of any more photos or videos so text is all you will be able to post for now.

Read about Freckle’s rescue below:

Big Cat Bailout

 

Alex the tiger sleeps through his moveOur federal government allows the private sector to trade in big cats, but when times get tough and the owners can’t feed the cats, who eat 15 lb of meat a day, it isn’t the government bailing them out. When you hear the term, “too big to fail” they aren’t talking about 500 lb cats and too many of them, but maybe they should be. All over America there are back yard cages, full of starving lions, tigers and leopards.

 

How did they get there?

 

Little to no oversight allows just about anyone to breed and discard big cats. They are only profitable as cubs when they are used for photo ops, petting sessions and stupid pet tricks. Places that advertise you can have your picture made with a lion or tiger will help you feel good about something you know is wrong by telling you that you are helping save the tigers by doing so.

 

Where do the big cats go?

 

Once they are a few months old they are too hard to handle and are discarded to unwitting pet owners, shot in canned hunts, cut up for their parts or relegated to tiny back yard, or “off exhibit” cages. Because of the lack of oversight and no requirement to report the death or disposal of these endangered species, they quietly disappear.

 

A few lucky ones end up at Big Cat Rescue. In December 2008 when the airwaves were all a-chatter about the government bailouts, Big Cat Rescue was bailing out a failed sanctuary formerly known as Cougar Haven. Driving away from the abandoned house, with its row upon row of now empty cages, ended a chapter in the 12 year history of David Mallory’s dream to be a big cat rescuer. Once lauded as a hero and now disgraced as a quitter, Mallory’s story is repeated frequently across the nation. It happens so often; that it barely makes the news any more and that alone is noteworthy.

 

In 1996 a big cat collector by the name of Catherine Gordon Twiss, who was convicted on 73 counts of cruelty, ended up with her 86 lions, tigers and bears selling at bankruptcy auction. Twiss had changed names and had fled from Indiana, to Arkansas, to Texas and finally to Mississippi. In each case Twiss would partner with some local who wanted a zoo or collection, but she would soon be thrown out for the wretched conditions in which she kept the animals. For example, an adult cougar was confined to a feces filled oil drum with barely enough room to turn around. (USDA standards only require the cage be big enough for the animal to stand up and turn around) As cubs continued to be born for fundraising purposes, like the photo ops mentioned above, the adults were crammed into tighter and tighter quarters. Lions and tigers were kept in small, urine soaked muddy cages with putrid buckets of drinking water. Many of her cats bore facial scars from fighting for their lives in these unnatural groupings of animals that are hard wired to be solitary. In Defense of Animals tried to help rescue some of the cats and, with the help of Mallory and a generous benefactor named Dr. Jim Cook, set up Cougar Haven in the backyard of a house at 39 Dobbs Road in Gore Springs, MS.

 

Scott meets Alex the tiger who can nearly reach the top of his cageAt its peak Cougar Haven was home to 38 big cats but there was never much local support for the sanctuary. It was seen as an eccentric’s private collection as a tunnel was built through the house so that guests could sit in the living room and watch cougars pace through. The open topped chain link cages were less than 8 feet high and as you can see in the photo, the cats could nearly reach the top.  The owner reported that there had been escapes and people had been chased by loose tigers.  Mallory was in the lumber business and things were good during the housing boom, but when that came to a screeching halt in 2007 conditions for the cats began to worsen. When the benefactor Dr. Cook died, his wife Rhonda cut off all income to the rescue and things really got bad.

 

The food was cut to just the cheapest chicken cuts and just often enough to keep them alive. The vet could no longer be employed. Cats began to die. By 2008 there were only 14 cats left and they were dying fast. One cougar bled for 12 days with no medical attention before suffering a cruel death. Mallory bought a topless bar 70 miles away and moved to be near it, leaving the remaining dozen big cats unsupervised most of the time. With no locks on the perimeter fence, neighborhood children could walk right in and stick their arms into the cages of lions and tigers. He quit paying Rita Montgomery, the cats’ caretaker, in May but she loved the cats too much to just walk away and leave them to die. Sometimes Mallory would send food, but when he didn’t, Montgomery did her best to scavenge what she could for the cats.

 

Rita called Doll Stanley who put out a desperate plea to Vernon Weir of the American Sanctuary Association in search of someone who could rescue these remaining cats. (The Mississippi Wildlife and Fisheries had ignored the call for help.) ASA member Tammy Quist, contacted Lynn Cuny of the Association of Sanctuaries (now called the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries) and Lynn rescued the two lions in October of 2008.  By the time Big Cat Rescue heard about the situation all but three of the remaining cats had died. Nine had passed away in just the past year. The last cats to remain were Freckles a 15 year old liger, Cookie a 14 year old tigress and Alex a 12 year old tiger. Freckles had a hole in her jaw that had gone untreated for a long time. It is not known if this is an abscess or cancer. All of her canine teeth were broken off from chewing at the chain link of her enclosure. Now, at Big Cat Rescue, she is finally getting the vet care she had been denied. They may not have much time left, but their last days will be their best days ever.

 

The Rescue

 

Big Cat Rescuers drove all night, through a fog as thick as pea soup, and arrived at Cougar Haven the morning of Dec. 18th. Scott Lope, Cathy Neumann, Chris Poole and Carole Baskin met up with Don & Rita Montgomery to assess the layout and prepare for the move. The cats’ vet, Dr. Abernathy, donated his services to issue the health certificates and to bring the tranquilization drugs in case the cats could not be coaxed into the transport cages. The transport team, Mike and Jamie, drove the Humane Train owned by Animal Sanctuary of the United States and arrived around 4 PM. Doll Stanley and Eric Phelps from In Defense of Animals came to see the cats off to their new home. Doll provided these photos and commiserated that, “People think that when they call a rescue group we can somehow just wave a magic wand and fix the problem.”

 

Door jams and Alex the tiger escapes the transportWith only an hour to work before dark the team quickly secured the transport to the first gate and tried to coax Alex in with a piece of meat. He was hungry and within minutes had leaped into the cage to grab the meat, but when he spun to leave he leaped up and hit his head on the top of the wagon. Between hitting his head and the noise of trying to shut the transport door, which had jammed, Alex freaked out and ran from the cage. We would try again later, but you only get one chance to trap a cat. They learn quick and starving or not, they don’t want to be confined to a small area.

 

We moved the transport over to the front door housing Freckles the liger.   The flimsy dog kennel styled door on her cage was barely containing her as mudslides had washed away a hole at the bottom large enough for her to stick her head under to try and bite the feet of anyone walking by.  She had just watched Alex and was wary of the situation, but in true cat style seemed to believe she too could grab the meat and get out of there. To paraphrase Ginger Rogers, Freckles implied “If Alex can do it, I can do it backwards and in heels.” Unseen to Big Cat Rescuers, David Mallory entered Freckles cage from the rear and as she was considering her big move, he nudged her forward and we shut the door. We know that entering a cage with a big cat is just an accident waiting to happen. People get away with it for years and then one day they get killed. We were horrified by Mallory’s reckless action but this was his yard and his rules.

 

We turned our attention in the waning light to secure Cookie the tigress. The transport had been rolled almost into place when Mallory opened the door of her cage and body blocked the charging tigress.  I nearly dropped the camera as Mallory was now the only thing between an adult tiger and all of us.  He moved aside and then pushed Cookie the last few inches into the transport. You can believe that door was shut quickly as it was now the only thing separating Cookie from the 12 human course dinner that she could have had. We stood there in stunned silence, shocked at the stupidity and thankful that the cat had not chosen to take advantage of it. By the time her transport was rolled up the hill to stand in line next to Freckles it was nearly dark and we still had to load Alex.

 

Freckles the liger is loadedSeveral fruitless attempts were made to coax Alex into the wagon. We knew that there was very little chance of succeeding, but we had to try. Cats often respond very badly to sedation. It can kill them and it builds up in their system, taxing their kidneys, and is a big contributor to why zoo cats often only live half as long as our cats do. Most of our medical care can be done using operant conditioning, where the cat will let us draw blood or give shots while getting treats. This takes a lot more time and patience, but pays off in longer, healthier lives.

 

Another distressing factor was that the cages were deep with mud and pools of bone chillingly cold water. If Alex dropped in the water he could drown before we could get to him. There was a section of the cage in the back that was drier than the rest, so Alex was solicited into this area and then sedated. The challenge to this smaller area was that we could not get the transport anywhere near the door and if the door was opened and Alex wasn’t completely asleep he would be in immediate contact with all of us. Unlike the shows you watch on TV it takes about 20 minutes for a big cat to pass out and they frequently come to rather unexpectedly. In this half dazed state they are even more dangerous because they lash out even when it is their nature to be easy going.

 

Shaking in the cold, the flash lights were the only illumination. We couldn’t see our own hands in front of our faces. Scenes flashed through my head of headlines that read, “Dozen Die in Big Cat Killing Spree” or “Tiger Flees Rescue and Attacks Kids at Bus Stop.” I kept trying to picture all three living their new life at Big Cat Rescue, but the scary headlines kept whizzing through as well. Then, as now, I am angry that there is even an opportunity for such awful consequences. If our government would take responsibility, as the U.K. has done, and ban the private possession of big cats, we wouldn’t be risking our lives and others while bailing out failed facilities.

 

Once we were certain that Alex was sleeping we loaded him onto a human stretcher and carried him around the back and side of the enclosures to the front yard where we slid him into the transport wagon. When we first arrived we thought that rolling the transports up the slimy slope to the road where the Humane Train was parked would be the hard part. After what we had just gone through that was the easy part.

 

The cages were all rolled up into the modified car carrier and plywood was placed between them for privacy. Before hitting the road we had to wait for Alex to wake up enough to know that he wasn’t going to die from the drugs. The vet forgot to bring the reversal agent and it was 2 hours before he was able to return to his clinic and back. We cannot legally transport these drugs across state lines so we are dependant upon local vets to help. The reversal worked and Alex was awake enough to travel by 9PM. Not only was he awake, but he was mad. Really mad. The madder he got, the more he scared Cookie and Freckles with the sound of his roars of displeasure. It was so sad to see big cats experiencing fear. These animals are at the top of the food chain and should never have to experience a single day of human induced fear.

 

Seeing us off, Rita said, “I will miss them, but I am so happy they will finally go someplace where they will get the care they need!” A truck pulled up along side us as we were closing the doors and said that he would miss their morning roars but that his wife, who had spent days in the hospital after being bitten by one of the cats, probably wasn’t going to miss them. We report on big cat attacks that make the news, but there is no way to know how many such maulings go unreported in the press.

 

Transport truck breaks down at 4 AMThe crew decided to forego sleep and drive straight through the night back to Big Cat Rescue. Mike and Jamie drove the Humane Train carrying the cats and Big Cat Rescuers followed in two cars. We made good time until we pulled off for gas in Cottendale, FL (near Marianna) where the Humane Train broke down. Prepared for the worse, Jamie and Mike hired a wrecker, at four in the morning, to tow the trailer to a motel where the generators kept the cats comfortable.  They had the truck towed to the nearest Ford dealer. Knowing that the dealer wouldn’t even be open until much later in the morning we opted to get a little shuteye so we could hit the road as soon as the truck was repaired.

 

Coaxing the mechanics off their butts turned out to be harder than coaxing the three big cats into boxes. It was their last day of work before Christmas.  By noon we gave up and began looking for a truck that could pull a 40 foot goose neck trailer. In a town that only has 881 residents, there aren’t a lot of options. We were pulling away from our last chance, a gas station that had a couple of unventilated box trucks to rent, when we were chased down by the owner with an afterthought. Turned out the proprietor had just remembered the name of a man in nearby Marianna who hauled horses that might be able to help. We had called horse haulers from Tampa to Gainesville and one of our Green level Keepers, Susan Mitchell was already enroute from Tampa, but that would add seven hours to the cats’ time on the road, so we looked up Greg Scott and plead for help.

 

Much to our amazement Mr. Scott was on the scene within an hour and we quickly hooked up the trailer and were back on the road. By the time we reached Tampa it was dark again. It just wasn’t worth the risk to life and limb to try and unload the cats in the dark given that our entire crew had been awake for two days straight with only the cat nap in Cottendale. We all got some sleep so that we would be fresh for the move from trailer to Cat-a-tats at the first light of dawn. Scott slept on a picnic bench in the parking lot so that he could listen for any trouble in the trailer. I guess after being kept in a box in the middle of a wild pride of lions, in Lion Feeding Frenzy on Discovery channel, Scott is sensitive to what it is like to feel trapped and surrounded by unknown wild animals.

 

The unloading went about the same as the loading, but without the crazy aspect of someone risking everyone’s lives by coming into contact with a big cat. Dr. Wynn, our vet, and Jarrod took off from work to come out early and help us unload.  Freckles, the liger, was first off and couldn’t wait to step out into her big new enclosure. She settled down behind a log to watch her friends as they were wheeled in.

 

Unloading the liger and tigers at Big Cat RescueCookie was next and she chuffed nervously the entire wagon ride from the parking lot to “tiger row.” She immediately took to her new surroundings and has been right at home from the first minute off the truck. Her neighbor, India the circus tiger, chuffed her welcome to Cookie. Of the group Cookie was the first to start eating, the first to start hanging out with keepers as they cleaned and has proven to have a wonderful disposition.

 

Alex was still mad and was determined to rip his way out of the transport wagon if we dared come near him. That wasn’t a possibility but he could break off teeth in the process and we decided the only way to keep him from inflicting severe injury to himself would be to sedate him for the move. It would give our vet, Dr. Liz Wynn, a chance to see if he had done any harm to himself during the move. We wheeled the transport and sleeping tiger up to the gate but had to lift him into his new home. He surprised us all by raising his head during the move but we tossed a blanket over his head and he quickly fell back into slumber. We took the opportunity to give him IV fluids and a physical exam before reversing the sedation. He woke up quickly and sauntered over to his new den.

 

Alex and Freckles spent their first few days evaluating their new home from the safety of their big rock caves. Their dens are larger than a lot of cages that lions and tigers live their entire lives in elsewhere. From this dark, cool spot they can watch both ends of their enclosures. By the third day Alex was hanging half in and half out of the den to watch everything around him. He would chuff as keepers came up to talk to him, but wasn’t quite ready to expose his entire body. Alex and Freckles would only come out at dinner and after dark at first, but each day gave them a little more assurance. The tour routes have been roped off so that they are only dealing with a few keepers in the area. We won’t expose them to tours until they are happy being around people.

 

Cookie would have been ready to meet her adoring fans that day, but since she is living right next to Alex and Freckles, she will have to wait. All three are adjusting to their new and improved diets and have had the experience of getting whole prey for possibly the first time in their lives. The whole rats and rabbits are fed dead, but the new “wrappers” are as much fun as the new food is nutritious and tasty. Thursday mornings are always the hardest days to clean as the prey fur is plucked and scattered all over 40 acres here. Many of us are card carrying “bunny huggers” too so it is hard to witness the aftermath of whole prey night, but the benefit to the cats is worth the damage to our psyches.

 

Alex the tiger examined by vetRescuing Freckles, Alex and Cookie gives us and our supporters the instant gratification of knowing that we saved lives. It gives our lives meaning to know that we spend our time and resources so that cats like these can experience compassion for once in their lives. It makes our hearts well up with pride, but it is just a small drop in the bucket. In 2008 we had to turn away 85 big cats and there are so few decent sanctuaries out there who can take big cats that we know most of them ended up dying or in horrible, overcrowded conditions where they will be allowed to “accidentally” breed more and more cubs. Pseudo sanctuaries almost always have cubs to use as photo props or pay to play schemes, and yet they ask you to believe that they were the result of “accidental” matings year after year after year.

 

Most people were opposed to the automotive industry bailout by our government. In large part it was because nothing was being required of the industry to change its ways. By the same token we do not accept animals from places that are just continuing to breed, sell, trade and exploit big cats. Many places do, because they rely on the new rescues to keep donations coming in. If the breeders and dealers were shut down, there would be no big cats to rescue and thus no reason for them to exist. Very few sanctuaries are trying to end the problem at its source and will say that they don’t like to get involved in politics or that they cannot because they are a non profit but that just isn’t true. Laws to end the trade in big cats are the most effective means to end the suffering.

 

Each big cat that we rescue means an increase of 7,500. per year in expenses so your support is critical to each of our cats, but it also goes a long way in helping us solve the problem of so many discarded big cats. Even people who cannot afford to donate much in the way of money can still be a huge part of the solution by educating others. By telling others about the plight of captive big cats, writing your lawmakers, and sending letters to the editor when you read about big cats in the news you are saving thousands of big cats from being born into lives of confinement and deprivation. Our goal is a world where all big cats live free and with your help we can do it.

 

Rita says Goodbye to Cookie the tigressSee the liger and tiger rescue slide show

 

 

 

Sources: Animal Underworld by Alan Green

 

Doll Stanley at In Defense of Animals

 

http://www.project-hope.net/diary000818.html

 

David Mallory

 

Rita & Don Montgomery

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Aug 17 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Aug 17 2013

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Lion vs Tiger? … Which is your favorite?

Liger lion vs tiger

Please don’t ask the age old, childish question about which one would win in a fight.  We don’t even what to think about cats fighting.
Learn the TRUTH about LIGERS here: http://bigcatrescue.org/liger-facts/

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Ohio Local Owners Call for Regulations Reversal of Dangerous Animal Ban

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Butternut Farms

caretaker Rick Armstrong kneels next to an African civet as it stalks around the interior of its enclosure.

/ Matthew Berry, The Advocate

JOHNSTOWN — For years, Evelyn Shaw has volunteered at Butternut Farms Wildcat Sanctuary in Johnstown and cared for large cats of her own, including a mountain lion.

But after then-Gov. Ted Strickland issued an emergency executive order Jan. 6 making it illegal to possess, sell or transfer “dangerous wild animals,” the Pataskala woman is anxious to learn how the new ban will affect the creatures she loves.

“I feel like it bans the animals and it bans (the owners),” Shaw said. “We are left trying to figure out what to do. We still haven’t gotten enough information yet.”

RULES AND EXEMPTIONS

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife will enforce the order, which restricts ownership of animals such as lions, primates and some types of pythons for the next 90 days.

Although the order bans new animals, individuals who owned restricted animals before Jan. 6 will be exempt, as long as they do not acquire any new animals or have their ownership license suspended, according to the ban.

Individuals must register their animals with the Division of Wildlife by May 1 and must renew their registration every year. Animals also must be implanted with a passive integrated transponder, a microchip that is used to identify animals.

Other entities that are exempt from the ban are institutions accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and facilities that have a contractual relationship with AZA to breed threatened or endangered species, according to the ban.

Entities licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, including circuses and existing mascot programs, as well as research facilities, wildlife rehabilitation facilities and wildlife sanctuaries that are nonprofit organizations also are exempt, according to the ban.

The order fulfills Strickland’s end of a deal with the Humane Society of the United States, other animal rights groups and Ohio’s agribusiness industry. The agreement prompted the Humane Society to withdraw a ballot issue containing restrictions on pet ownership and treatment and livestock care.

As an emergency order, Strickland’s order is temporary — running through March 6. A permanent ban could be submitted by ODNR and accepted by the Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review.

WHAT ANIMALS ARE AFFECTED BY THE BAN?

• Coyotes, timber and gray wolves

• Bears

• Lions, tigers, jaguars, leopards, clouded and snow leopards, cheetahs, bobcats, lynx, cougars, pumas and mountain lions

• Primates

• Alligators, crocodiles, caimans and gharials

• Mole vipers, anacondas, burmese pythons, reticulated pythons, amethystine pythons, scrub pythons, northern and southern African pythons, boomslangs, twig snakes, cobra, mamba and coral snakes, sea snakes, rattlesnakes, pit vipers and puff adders

Source: Ohio Department of Natural Resources

OPPOSITION TO THE BAN

Besides being an animal owner, Shaw is the director of legislation for the United States Zoological Association and Uniting a Politically Proactive Exotic Animal League. Both groups strongly oppose the ban, she said.

“We will support fair regulation, and this is not fair. This is a straight-out ban,” she said.

Before Strickland’s order, Ohio had some of the nation’s weakest restrictions on exotic animals and among the highest number of injuries and deaths caused by them, according to The Associated Press.

Better rules were needed, but passing an emergency order was unnecessary, Shaw said

“It’s one thing if they wanted to work with different groups and come up with different regulations. This is just flat out saying, ‘You can’t have them,'” she said. “This is our property, and our love for them is very strong.”

‘A LOT OF QUESTIONS’

The administration of the Division of Wildlife is reviewing the executive order to establish what steps need to be taken, said Laura Jones, chief of communications for ODNR.

“We are going to need to take a very long look at this,” Jones said Wednesday. “We are not a full three days into a new administration, and we need to understand what this executive order is calling for. For us to take time and consider this is very important.”

For Carol Bohning, the owner and director of Butternut Farms, Strickland’s executive order has left her with more questions than answers.

“There are a lot of questions now about the future,” Bohning said. “The rules are very confusing.”

Bohning started the sanctuary in 2000. It provides a home for 22 animals including cougars, bobcats, a wolf, foxes and Siberian lynx. Many of them were mistreated or abandoned by their owners.

Years ago, Bohning got a USDA exhibitor’s license so she could do educational programs at the farm. Groups of schoolchildren come to see the animals, and students from Ohio State University volunteer to care for them.

Because Butternut Farms is a nonprofit sanctuary, Bohning is confident she’ll be able to keep her animals. But with many of them getting older, Bohning is concerned she won’t be able to replace them when they die.

“After a time, our mission will be completely gone,” she said. “In a few years, there will not be that educational component in Ohio.”

Bohning said she plans to move her animals to land she owns in Hocking County, but she isn’t sure she’ll be able to do that under the ban.

“I don’t mind state regulations, but I really dislike the fact that people who do not understand animals are coming in from out of state and telling animal owners what is best for their animals,” she said.

MORE HARM THAN GOOD?

Chris Law’s biggest fear is that Strickland’s ban will end up hurting animals instead of helping them.

As director of the Ohio Reptile Service, Law has spent years assisting law enforcement agencies around central Ohio with removing large reptiles, such as snakes or alligators, from homes.

After receiving medical care, many of the reptiles were adopted or used for educational programing. But Strickland’s order could change that, Law said.

“It’s so unclear, it’s very difficult for me to know if I can assist police and what I can do with these animals,” he said.

The confusion could lead to an animal being euthanized instead of rescued, Law said.

The ban also could cause owners to abandon their animals or neglect them, said Joe Schreibvogel, president of the USZA.

The association already has received several calls from Ohio owners looking to get rid of their animals.

“If you can’t breed or sell something, why feed it?” he said. “You have to face the fact that a lot more animals will be euthanized and a lot more animals are going to starve or not get the care they need.”

The ban will not keep dangerous animals out of Ohio, Law said.

“Regardless of the law, people can get them from other places,” he said. “Animals will still be kept illegally, and all legal keepers are stuck.”

DISCUSSING CONCERNS

Shaw, Law and Schreibvogel said they are working to make their concerns known while the ban is still temporary.

“We would like to meet with (new Gov. John) Kasich and discuss what regulations should and shouldn’t be there,” Shaw said. “We want to have the chance for this to go through legislation.”

On Jan. 6, Kasich said he supports the ban in concept.

“We don’t want exotic animals here where somebody’s bringing something in and then some neighbor gets hurt. So we’ll look at it,” he said during a news conference. “It sounds reasonable, but just let me take a look at it. I would be inclined to say we should continue it.”

Bohning said she hopes changes can be made and regulations can replace the ban.

“I want to see (these animals) being taken care of to the best of anyone’s ability, and I think Ohio can help move toward that,” she said. “I don’t think an all out ban is the way to go.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Anna Sudar can be reached at (740) 328-8544 or asudar@newarkadvocate.com.


If a lion and tiger got into a fight, who would win?

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ANSWER: While we would much prefer that people focus their thoughts on saving these magnificent animals than on who would win if a lion and tiger fight, the power of these two largest cats seems to raise this question in people’s minds. While it would depend on the size, age and aggressiveness of the specific animals involved, generally tigers have a significant advantage. On average tigers are larger, but more importantly they are more capable of fighting standing on their hind legs. Some people have argued that the male lion’s mane offers some advantage in protecting his neck, but this is disputed. Some reports claim that when lions and tigers were pitted against each other in the Coliseum in ancient Rome, the tigers always won. In recent centuries there are almost no opportunities for tigers and lions to cross paths in the wild because tigers are found in Asia while Lions are found in Africa except for a very small population in one area in Asia.

Our white tiger Zabu lives with her male lion companion Cameron at Big Cat Rescue. They get along well, but part of their play simulates fighting. These two were saved from being bred to create ligers.