Bobcat Rehab

Bobcat Rehab

Big Cat Rescue Rehabilitates Bobcats

for Release Back to the Wild

Watch our Rehab Bobcats LIVE on this explore.org web cam: http://explore.org/live-cams/player/big-cat-rescue-bobcat-rehab-and-release

My Bobcat is in Rehab TEE BlackSee who is in rehab now:

Ms Claws http://bigcatrescue.org/the-claws

Find out more about some of our recent bobcat rescues, rehab and their release:

Thor http://bigcatrescue.org/thor

 

Rain and Dancer http://bigcatrescue.org/release-of-rain-and-dancer-bobcats/

Phoenix and Captiva:  http://bigcatrescue.org/phoenix-rehab/ and here:  http://bigcatrescue.org/4-bobcat-kittens/

Mr Claws http://bigcatrescue.org/the-claws

 

Give to Big Cat Rescue

 

Donate to make this bobcat rehab work possible.

 

What Do Rehab Bobcats Do All Day?

How to Care for Rehab Bobcat

 

 

Cage rest sounds pretty peaceful for the cat, but it’s a real challenge for the caregivers.

 

See 2 playlists of some of our rehab bobcats

 

While we do bobcat rescue, rehab and release in Florida, we will not relocate bobcats as state law requires that they be released very near where they were captured. They must be released on at least 40 acres and we must get written permission from the owner of the property. They may not be released into state owned parks (strangely) but rather must be released on privately owned land with the land owner’s consent.

Big Cat Rescue has decades of experience rehabbing and releasing bobcats back to the wild where they belong. We provide huge, naturalistic enclosures where these cats can learn or perfect their hunting skills before being released back to the wild. We have trained staff who are experts at capturing an injured bobcat or hand rearing orphaned bobcats until a surrogate can be found.

We go to great lengths to keep these wild cats from imprinting on humans and monitor their care via surveillance cameras to make sure they are thriving. When they are healed, or old enough for release (about 18 months of age) we find the best habitat possible for sustaining them and set them free to live out the life that nature intended.

If you have a bobcat emergency in a state other than Florida, we can help you find a rehabber or will be a resource to wildlife rehabilitators who need help with bobcats, lynx or cougars. When you are searching for a bobcat rehabber ask the following questions:

1. Do they have experience with bobcats?

2. How big are their rehab enclosures? (Ours start at 1200 square feet and some are double that)

3. Do they feed a live diet of prey to insure that the cats will be able to hunt for themselves?

4. Do they keep people, including themselves to the extent possible, away from the bobcat so that they do not imprint on people and end up approaching humans after release?

5. Do they have a vet on staff or on call 24/7 for emergencies?

Rehabbing and releasing bobcats is much more difficult that the rehabilitation of most wildlife. These magnificent little wildcats need every opportunity to fulfill their role in nature and Big Cat Rescue is here to give them that second chance.

Donate to make this bobcat rehab work possible.

No one is allowed to trap and relocate bobcats so anyone who tells you that they will do that is probably trapping them to use as bait for training dogs.

Read more about why relocating wildcats doesn’t work:  http://bigcatrescue.org/relocating-bobcats-and-cougars/

Get the flier to share with your neighbors about Living With Bobcats http://bigcatrescue.org/000news/pdf/2009/BCR_FLBobcat_Brochure_Web.pdf

More Bobcat Rehab Success Stories

 

2003-2016 Big Cat Rescue has had 29 cats come through the rehab program. In addition we have gone on 2 calls where we have seen the injured bobcat, but were unable to catch it.

2003 – 1

Faith – Orphaned juvenile, rehabbed til grown and released (1st attempt at rehabbing and releasing a weaning kitten)

2007 – 4

Chance – Injured & birth defects, surgery to repair hernia, rehabbed, released

Will – Brain damaged juvenile, not releasable, permanent resident

Kennedy – Brain damaged juvenile, not releasable, permanent resident, died from seizure

Ace – Emaciated adult, FIV positive, not permitted to release, permanent resident, died from FIV

2008 – 1

Hope – Orphaned nursing kitten, utilized foster domestic mom and kittens, rehabbed til grown and released (1st attempt at rehabbing and releasing a nursing kitten)

2009 – 4

Dante – Hit by car, broken jaw, rehabbed, released

Bellona – Hit by car, broken leg & tail, plate surgery at Blue Pearl, follow up knee surgery at Blue
Pearl, rehabbed released

Flash – Injured, no vet care needed, rehabbed, released

Christmas – Hit by car, injuries too severe, euthanized

2010 – 4

Skip – Hit by car, broken pelvis, surgery w/ Dr. Hay, rehabbed, pelvis healed too narrow, permanent resident, died from seizure

Midnight – Orphaned kitten, died of feline distemper

Rain – Orphaned kitten, died of feline distemper

Storm – Orphaned kitten, died of feline distemper and congenital heart disease

2012 – 2

Gator – Orphaned juvenile, rehabbed til grown and released

Copter – Orphaned juvenile, rehabbed til grown and released

2013 – 2

Khaleesi – Orphaned juvenile, rehabbed til grown and released

Fencer – Caught in fence, broken toe, rehabbed, released

2014 – 2

Cypress – Broken pelvis, FHO surgery at Blue Pearl, pelvis did not heal, euthanized

Ivan – Both front legs amputated, suspected trap, euthanized

2015 – 7

Journey – Orphaned kitten, died of feline distemper

Phoenix – Orphaned kitten, burned in brush fire, rehabbed, released

Captiva – Orphaned kitten, rehabbed, released

Rain – Orphaned kitten, rehabbed, released

Dancer – Orphaned kitten, rehabbed, released

Mr. Claws – Orphaned juvenile, broken leg, plate surgery at Humane Society, rehabbed, released

Mrs. Claws – Orphaned kitten, injury to head, stunted growth, still in rehab

2016 – 2

Poseidon – Severe parasite and mange infestation, died as a result

Thor – Broken jaw, eye socket, and shoulder blade, jaw surgery at Humane Society, rehabbed released

http://bigcatrescue.org/a-baby-bobcat-named-faith/

http://bigcatrescue.org/a-boatload-of-bobcats-turns-big-cat-rescue-into-modern-day-ark/

 

Hope the Bobcat

Episode 1 https://youtu.be/BcNZVF4ayDc

Episode 2 https://youtu.be/3afjaPdvJ38

Episode 3 https://youtu.be/68GjuVogId8

Episode 4 https://youtu.be/jKVDhfVtgao

Episode 5 https://youtu.be/PNPO5iCeU54

Episode 6 https://youtu.be/xtvIxx6dEe8

Episode 7 https://youtu.be/GJa-NqeJG14

Episode 8 https://youtu.be/3sbsRoAdfsU

Episode 9 https://youtu.be/ZMrki7Jy3Fk

Episode 10 https://youtu.be/Sfl_T3aF_ZA

Episode 11 https://youtu.be/noiygWDCo5o

Episode 12 https://youtu.be/CHnz3w7YQVo

Episode 13 https://youtu.be/oW7pmvv_Dmo

Episode 14 https://youtu.be/iXPjBTpZx1U

Help Expand Bobcat Rehab Capacity

We are thinking the bobcat rehab rebuild is going to run about a quarter of a million dollars.

The area that would be most suitable on our property would allow a foot print of about 200 feet by 800 feet and would give us about 1/3 of that in thick woods and 2/3 in grassy runs. The woods are a blessing and a curse when we are talking chain link boxes.

Bobcat Rehab Site

Click map to see larger

The pink areas are our permanent big cat residents. The green shaded area is where we want to move our bobcat rehab facilities. It will be the opposite end of our property from the new hotel that is going in on Easy Street.

The 18 acre lake was dug out by the previous owner and then he was filling it in, starting w/ the green shaded area, with concrete and construction materials from demolition sites. He dug the lake down to 30 feet in places, so we could have that much concrete to drill through.

Wild bobcats DO dig, so we have to have a floor. That’s why I was thinking that a big chain link box, complete with roof and floor, might actually work there. It would have to be 1 in mesh and at least 11.5 gauge to meet state standards and keep their live rats from escaping. We would put dirt, grass and shrubs over the flooring after install.

This year we had 7 bobcats in rehab, which is the most we’ve had at one time, but as our reputation for successful releases grows, more cats seem to end up here, so we need to be ready for that growing demand.

We are confident that we can end the practice of private ownership of big cats, so the wildlife rehab work will expand as the need for big cat sanctuaries decreases with our legislative wins.

We own the three houses and two barns that are south of the green shaded area, so there is water, power and Internet nearby. The main house and the two barns have a life estate by the elderly owner though, so I’d have to build something for indoor care of injured cats, but it wouldn’t have to be huge because of the opportunity to take over the existing structures soon.

Currently the intensive care is done in our on site Cat Hospitals, but it would really be nice to have the wild bobcats totally away from the hubbub of the sanctuary, in their own recovery facilities adjoining the outdoor runs.

What I envision here are 8 long, narrow runs, maybe 20 by 230 each, that could be opened up into 4 that are 20 x 470 when there are 4 or fewer cats. Still puzzling about how to make the space expandable, without shared walls, which are just a tragedy waiting to happen.

Whether a bobcat comes to us injured or orphaned, they usually go through these stages:

Give to Big Cat Rescue1. Inside intensive care
2. Outside, small (low) cages so they don’t climb and fall.
3. 1000 -2500 square feet of space to perfect their hunting, climbing, hiding skills.

Another factor that I haven’t quite figured out yet, is how to mount cameras so that we can make sure the cats are doing well, and to engage the public. Our Bobcat Rehab camera is very popular at http://explore.org/live-cams/player/big-cat-rescue-bobcat-rehab-and-release and a great way to engage people in caring about wildlife, so I want to build it with a goal of it being a good virtual visual experience.

Plans-Bobcat Rehab Center

Each cage will require 27,120 sf of 1 in chain link mesh.  Or roughly 64,750 linear feet of 8 foot high chain link mesh.  http://www.yourfencestore.com/ lists 10 gauge, 1 inch mesh for 11.14 per linear foot which means a retail cost.

Below are mockups by Kenni Pedersen of what the bobcat rehab runs will look like.

3D-Bobcat

Kenni’s working on an animated version.

3D-Bobcat overlay

The Claws

The Claws

Mr. Claws Set to Go Free

Mr. Claws has done a great job of healing and preparing for life in the wild, so in the next few days he will be returned to the same county where he was found and set free.  You can help us rescue, rehab and release bobcats, like Mr. Claws with the purchase of this fun, new tee called, My Bobcat’s in Rehab.

Mr Claws Bobcat Rehab Tee

Meet Mr. and Mrs. Claws

Having been rescued from Christmas, Florida, we just couldn’t resist the timely names.  Help make their holiday wishes come true by supporting their rehab and release back to the wild.

We wish they could talk, because it would take a lot of the guesswork out of their care.  Based on the injuries and and reports by Carol Hardee, the rehabber who was the first on the scene for both kittens, here is how it probably happened.

Donate to big cats

Watch Mrs Claws LIVE in the Bobcat Rehab area: http://explore.org/live-cams/player/big-cat-rescue-bobcat-rehab-and-release

See the video at the bottom of the page to understand why they were separated.  The webcam footage is black and white and grainy because it was captured after dark using IR cameras.

September 2015 Mrs Claws:

Only a few weeks old, and not barely 3 pounds, she was being shaken to the core.  She could barely breathe due to the crushing jaws that had snatched her from her den.  Being shaken wildly, she could barely think, much less scream out for her mother, to return and save her.  The tiny bobcat was flung into the air, and hitting the ground rolled a few feet, but before she could gather her balance to run, she was snatched up again.  She was being carried away by some monster that was having fun playing with her, like she was a toy, but she was bleeding and this “toy” wasn’t going to last long.

With every last bit of strength, and every thing she learned from being raised by one of the most fierce of all felines, she bit and clawed back.  She aimed for the eyes and the sensitive nose, since that’s all she could reach from her vantage point of being held in the mouth of this creature.  With a yelp her freedom had been secured.  She didn’t know if it would be for a moment, or for good.  She had to find her mother as soon as possible.  She was just too young to be dealing with this terror on her own.

She called and called, but she’d been carried too far away.  Her mother couldn’t find her and she was too small and too badly injured to find her way back to the nest.  But Carol Hardee, of the Wildlife Rehab Center, found her and began treating her life threatening wounds.

BobcatRehabMrsClaws

The kitten doubled in size, but was reaching an age when she would need to be transferred to a rehab center that could teach her to hunt.  A mother will spend a year and a half, or more, teaching her kittens how to hunt, how to stay away from people and how to survive in a tough world.  This kitten was about ready to make that move, to a new stage of training, when Mr. Claws arrived on the scene.

November 5 2015 Mr Claws

He had found a warm spot under the hood of a car to hide until dark.  He’d gotten too far out of the woods for his own good, and now there were kids running wild in the YMCA parking lot, so he figured he would just wait it out.  The one thing his mother hadn’t taught him about being a bobcat, is that you should never go near cars, even if they are sitting still and being silent.

When the owner returned, the slam of the door almost gave him enough notice, but not quite.  The key turned in the ignition and a ton of metal gears, belts and a fan roared to life.  The fan both cut him to the bone in one leg, while snapping another leg bone in two.  He was flipped out to the pavement beneath.  As the owner of the car backed out of the parking space, he saw the young bobcat trying desperately to pull himself to safety with his front paws.

BobcatRehabMrClaws_0020

Not knowing what to do, the auto driver called the police.  They called the Florida Wildlife Commission and between them managed to capture the broken little bobcat in a box.

BobcatRehabMrClaws

Again, the closest rehabber was Carol Hardee, of the Wildlife Rehab Center, who does her life saving work from a ranch in the woods, on Reindeer Lane in Christmas, Florida.

Due to family matters she was not able to get the bobcat X-rayed, but could see that he was not recovering properly and it really was time for the little female to start to learn to hunt.  Carol Hardee called Carole Baskin, of Big Cat Rescue to see if we could take both bobcats and finish their rehab and release.

Jamie Veronica made the 5 hour round trip, ending at the Humane Society of Tampa Bay, where Mr. Claws was rushed into X-ray.  Jamie’s husband, Dr. Boorstein, had enlisted the help of Dr. Bard and tech, Jamie Gibbs, and the four of them worked on saving Mr. Claws leg for the next 4 hours.

BobcatRehabMrClawsBobcatRehabMrClaws

There was no handling this wild child, so he had to be sedated.

BobcatRehabMrClaws

BobcatRehabMrClawsBobcatRehabMrClaws

The vets were able to get a good look at his face, noting a slight ulceration to the eye, and some broken and missing teeth. The gash was cleaned and sewed up.  His tail had been separated in the spinal column, but no outer damage was visible.  It could have happened in the accident, or someone may have grabbed him by the tail trying to save him.  The tail may be dead and might have to be amputated later.

BobcatRehabMrClaws BobcatRehabMrClaws_0037

The damage to the back leg bone is obvious, but what is less obvious is that the pelvis is cracked and uneven.  This may heal or may need further surgery.  Dr. Boorstein is consulting with orthopedic specialist, Dr. Callum Hay.

BobcatRehabMrClaws

Humane Society of Tampa Bay vet tech, Jamie Gibbs, prepares Mr. Claws for surgery.

BobcatRehabMrClaws BobcatRehabMrClaws

Dr. Justin Boorstein and Dr. Bard working to save Mr. Claws leg.

BobcatRehabMrClaws BobcatRehabMrClaws

Pins in the bone to hold it together under the skin.  You can’t put a cast on a wild cat.  They will chew it or their leg off.

We can’t know for certain what happened to either of these kittens before they arrived here, but one thing we do know for certain is that we will always be here to help wild cats like them, as long as you are by our side.

We Sure Hope They Kiss and Make Up Before Valentine’s Day

More Photos of Mr and Mrs Claws

Mr. and Mrs. Claws are in our onsite West Boensch Cat Hospital temporarily.  Soon we hope to send them to a far larger outdoor space where they can begin to get ready for life in the wild.  At this writing we have 6 bobcats in rehab and desperately need to build a larger rehab area to accommodate this growing need.

Donate to big cats

Mr Claws on the way to Big Cat Rescue

BobcatRehabMrClaws

Mrs Claws on the way to Big Cat Rescue

BobcatRehabMrsClaws BobcatRehabMrsClaws BobcatRehabMrsClawsBobcatRehabMrsClaws

Bobcat Rescue Sparta Georgia

Bobcat Rescue Sparta Georgia

“I’ll pay you $500.00 if you will turn around and go back to help DNR rescue that bobcat!”  I was desperate, because I know how most of the staff, at Department of Natural Resources agencies across America, feel about bobcats.  They are just competitors to the hunters who want to shoot the “game” animals themselves.  They say things like, “The only good bobcat is a dead bobcat.”

Mike assured me that he didn’t care about the money and that he would go help, if the fish and game officer would allow him, but he really didn’t think that would happen.  I’ve kind of gotten ahead of myself though, as I am still pretty upset over the whole ordeal.

3:58 PM I got a call from a surveyor who was working the area of Fulsome Creek Road and Poole Road in Sparta, Georgia.  He said he’d come across a bobcat in a leg hold trap who was panting and panicked.  He couldn’t get close enough to the cat to free him (you know how bobcats are) but he didn’t want the bobcat to starve to death like the raccoon in the next trap over.

It’s illegal to trap animals, without a license, unless they are considered a nuisance.  Even under those circumstances, the law states that you have to check the traps every 24 hours.  The raccoon near the bobcat was badly decomposed, so we knew this was either an illegal trap or the trapper wasn’t abiding by the law.

The caller said his name was Mike and that he’d called the Georgia Department of Natural Resources an hour earlier, but no one had called him back.  He just couldn’t get the haunting look of the bobcat, left trapped to suffer and die a cruel death, out of his mind.

He called Big Cat Rescue.

I suggested that he try a local vet, who might know a rescue group in the area, but he said Sparta was a “po-dunk town” that didn’t have any vet clinics.  I took his name, number, the street intersection (two dirt roads in the middle of nowhere) and said I’d try to track down a rehabber.

BobcatSpartaEarth

I went to the Georgia Wildlife Resources Division to see if I could find any local rehabbers in Hancock County.  Rehabbers are a wonderful kind of people, who will risk it all to save wild animals, and nurse them back to health, but I can count on one hand the ones that have any sort of marketing sense.  There are rehabber lists, but they are always outdated and just about useless.

BobcatSpartaDNR

There weren’t any wildlife rehabilitaters in Hancock County, so I pulled up a map of surrounding counties. Greene, Taliaferro, Warren, Glascock, Washington, Jefferson, Baldwin and Putnam Counties, and only one rehab facility amongst them.

BobcatSpartageorgia-county-map

That one place, the Mockingbird Hill Wildlife Rehab Center, was in the next county over; Washington County.

BobcatSpartaRehab

I called both numbers, left the info at both answering machines, and then turned my attention to local veterinarians.

I called Tim Gress, the person who had run a sanctuary in Georgia, where we had gotten Kali Tiger.  He said he was over an hour away and couldn’t leave work.  He said he didn’t have the tools to deal with a bobcat anyway.  I told him he could come visit Kali and he said he was saving up vacation time to do that.

The closest veterinarian I could find, was also in Washington County, so it would be a long shot, but I called them.

BobcatSparta7hrs

It would be an hour drive for them but it would be 6 and a half hours for me and I can’t take controlled drugs across state lines and couldn’t take the bobcat in any case as I am not licensed in Georgia.  By the time I could get there, it would be the middle of the night and no chance that I’d find the bobcat on my own.

I got a kindly woman, with a very southern accent named Amy, and she said she knew the Game Warden, Bryant Adams, in Glascock County.  She said that he was the one who covered Hancock County, since they don’t have their own Animal Control Services.  She said she would call him.  I asked her to call me back if she was not successful. I wasn’t going to let this bobcat chew off his own foot even though I hadn’t figured out what Plan B was going to be.

BobcatSparta1_2314I’d been calling and texting, back and forth with Jamie Veronica, and she had checked with Dr. Justin Boorstein about any drugs that could be used to sedate a bobcat that might be legal to transport across state lines and he said there were none.  Even if we were able to transport the drugs across state lines, we aren’t licensed to use them and he can’t just up and leave work for a two day mission to save the bobcat.  AND even if he could, he’s not licensed to practice medicine in Georgia.

4:44 PM  I call the surveyor to let him know that I’ve called the vet, who is calling the Glascock Game Warden, and Mike tells me that meanwhile the DNR has called him back.  He told the officer where the cat could be found and the officer complained that all he had was a choke stick and he was by himself, so he had no idea how he was going to get the bobcat out of a foothold trap alive.  Mike said from the way the guy laughed while saying it, that he feared for the bobcat’s life.

That’s when I said, “I’ll pay you $500.00 if you will turn around and go back to help DNR rescue that bobcat!”

Mike agrees that if the DNR officer will allow it, he’ll drop off his workmate, turn around and make the 45 minute drive back to the scene to help.  He gives me the phone number for the officer and I called, but got voicemail, so as I am leaving him a message, with Mike’s offer, a call comes in.

I switch over and it’s a deer rehabber named John Burke who I mistake, initially, for the fish and game officer.  Once we clear that up, he tells me that he has no experience with bobcats, but he’s willing to try.  He asks what I would do if I didn’t have any way to sedate the cat.

BobcatSparta2I tell him that we do two nets down over the cat, then a big blanket on top and would try to fish the trapped leg out with gloved hands, to pry off the trap.  I give him both the fish and game officer’s number and Mike’s number and suggest that he call DNR first to offer assistance.  He says he will.

Meanwhile, our Operations Manager, Gale Ingham, has overheard all of this and gets on the phone with our Gift Shop Manager, Honey Wayton because she thinks Honey has relatives in Georgia.  They are all willing to go help someone as well.  I get another text from Mike who tells me that a second agent from DNR has contacted him and is going out to help the first one.

Amazing how many people show up to help after all!

 

So if you are all on edge, like I’ve been all day, you will be thrilled to know that Corporal Dave Allen of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources returned my call the next day to let me know that he had successfully released the bobcat.  He said there was minimal damage to the foot and he believed the bobcat would be able to hunt and survive with no further intervention.

 

Poseidon

Poseidon

Poseidon Bobcat Rescued in Port Charlotte

Rescued 2/16/2016 10:40 PM 3504 Ogden St Port Charlotte, FL Died 2/19/2016

I would have thought that time had stood still because Jamie was poised, net in the air, leaning impossibly into the space between us on one foot, and she had stopped moving.  Interns, Martin and Devin had also stopped mid step with her.  You could hear a pin drop into the high grass that was up past our knees, and the freezing cold water that was up over our ankles.  It was like how a live feed just freezes, but you aren’t sure if the connection has died, or if all has just gone very, very still.

In Honor PoseidonMy racing heart told me that time hadn’t stopped, but everything around the center attraction had.

At the center of this bizarre scene was a bobcat who had been seen vomiting on the side of the road.

A cat vomiting is hardly an emergency situation and certainly not one you would drive two hours to witness, but this one seemed to have extenuating circumstances.  Around 6PM a call came in from a Port Charlotte woman named Sandy, who said she had been on her way to the ER regarding her mother, and had seen a bobcat vomiting on the side of the road.  When asked to identify what the cat looked like, as most people don’t have any idea what a bobcat looks like, she said, “Well…it looks like a bobcat.”

Jamie asked what a bobcat looked like to Sandy and she said it had a six inch long tail and was half the size of a German Shepherd dog.  Before driving 4 hours, round trip, Jamie asked for a cell phone photo, but the woman was too busy with her mother and the hospital.  She said her husband had taken some video, but Jamie wasn’t sure they would be willing to pay the data transfer rate to send it.  I queried our database and found 103 people in Port Charlotte.  I emailed and asked if any of them would drive to the approximated address of Ogden Street, and tell me if there was really a bobcat there.

Over the next few hours, 11 people responded, and several drove to the scene.  All but two said there was no bobcat to be seen.  Meanwhile the caller did get a photo and did send the video, but we were already on our way.  Two of the people we emailed said they saw the bobcat and that they were certain they could wrestle him into a carrier, but Jamie convinced them not to try as the bobcat could hurt them or run off and be impossible for us to find and help.

Two hours seemed like two days, but Jamie used the time to prepare our interns for what was to come.  I’m always surprised that after dealing with bobcats, and knowing how mean they can be, that when we say we need volunteers to help rescue one in the wild, they are so eager and fearless to help.  Even when answering the question, “what’s the worst you’ve ever been hurt rescuing a bobcat” by saying, “I haven’t had to peel one off my face yet,” they are still keen to give it a shot.

As we pulled up on the scene, Sandy’s husband was dutifully keeping an eye on the bobcat.  He brought us up to speed with important facts like how long the cat had been sitting there (5 hours by this time) how close he had been able to get without the cat running (about 10 feet) and he gave us the low down on bobcats in the area, and how they get along with the domestic cats.  He and I both held flashlights on the bobcat’s face, so that Jamie, Martin and Devin could circle around behind him and on the side that was open to the road.

The last thing you ever want to do in a bobcat rescue is chase the wounded cat into the path of another car.

The bobcat was on a dry patch of ground, surrounded by the cold water and knee high saw grass.  Jamie asked me to make little sounds with my feet, each time he tensed as if he was going to bolt, to divert his attention away from the approaching captors.

He looked pretty washed up; like he had given up and was just waiting to die.  He smelled like he had been dead for three days.  It was gaggingly wretched to breathe the air surrounding him.  Despite that though, you could tell that if he could make a break for it, he was going to give it a try.  That’s when Jamie, Devin and Martin had frozen in mid step.

In a motion too quick for me to see, and just a fraction of a second too quick for the bobcat to respond, Jamie’s net was down over him.  He leapt against it and thrashed wildly, but Devin and Martin came down with their nets with amazing accuracy and speed.

Netted.  Check!

In the carrier.  Not yet.

But Jamie had described how it would need to go, and ran the interns through it one more time to make sure they knew where their nets had to be, and what to do if he managed to slip free during the transfer from the net to the carrier.  Given the fact that he looked to be covered in mange, and thoroughly chewed up by some animal, she warned them again not to touch him; no matter what.

You would think the team had done this together for years; it went so smoothly!  The husband and wife who had originally called in the incident were now both standing there and nearly broke into applause over the successful capture.  Now for the two hour drive back to Big Cat Rescue where Dr. Justin would be done with Mrs. Claws and waiting for the bobcat who was soon to be named Poseidon.

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-Carrier

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-Captured

 

The Vet Examines Poseidon Bobcat

X-rays didn’t show any broken bones.  As suspected, the bobcat was covered in mange and had been beaten up by another animal.  His face is oozing from the mange infestation. He has a BB under the skin, indicating someone shot at him.  He has a belly full of bones, and he may have trouble passing them, as he is so dehydrated.

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-xray

His face and elbow have been bitten pretty badly. We have to treat the handling of him, as if he has rabies, since we don’t know what bit him.

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-Mange

He’s getting 400 ML of sub q fluids, treatment for the parasites, a long acting antibiotic and pain meds. 6 injections. No broken bones. Poseidon is recovering in our office because the hospital is full.

Poseidon Bobcat Has Died Feb 19, 2016

Sadly Poseidon Bobcat passed away last night sometime between 12-4 AM. Yesterday he seemed to be turning the corner and ate about 3 oz of food, then in the early evening he crashed. We tried fluids, and different medications, but nothing helped. He became unresponsive and could not regulate his body temperature and so he was put on a heating pad. At least he passed away in a safe place comfortable and in his sleep. We will be sending him out to a specialist for a necropsy. We suspect several things including neurological disease, sepsis from his skin infection, and poisoning. Thank you to everyone who helped bring him in and provide him with such special care during his final days.

Poseidon bobcat update Feb 18, 2016

He’s moving from one side of the cage to the other, with considerable effort, and has drank on his own, but still isn’t eating.  We are having to give him injections for pain and antibiotics.

Poseidon bobcat update Feb 17, 2016:

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-CratePoseidon is alive this morning and already looking a LOT better than he did last night. He is sitting up and drinking on his own.

 

Photos and Videos

Facebook album:  https://www.facebook.com/bigcatrescue/photos/a.10153311049176957.1073741902.122174836956/10153311051371957/?type=3&theater

Dropbox link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/uvxchcv72eok1mu/AABoEAhieVdPPH_B-Ta7ej5qa?dl=0

Watch our Rehab Bobcats LIVE on this explore.org web cam: http://explore.org/live-cams/player/big-cat-rescue-bobcat-rehab-and-release

Poseidon-Bobcat-Rehab-Office

 

See who else is in rehab now:

 

My Bobcat is in Rehab TEE Black

Every tee shirt purchased helps get bobcats back to the wild, where they belong…and you’ll look cool too.

Thor http://bigcatrescue.org/thor

Mr and Mrs Claws http://bigcatrescue.org/the-claws

Find out more about some of our recent bobcat rescues, rehab and their release:

Rain and Dancer http://bigcatrescue.org/release-of-rain-and-dancer-bobcats/

Phoenix and Captiva:  http://bigcatrescue.org/phoenix-rehab/ and here:  http://bigcatrescue.org/4-bobcat-kittens/

Phoenix Rehab

Phoenix Rehab

Phoenix and Captiva

(Warning to chicken lovers, there is a photo on the page of the bobcat eating a chick.  These chicks arrive frozen and are the byproduct of the egg industry.  All male chicks are usually disposed of at birth.  We buy them to feed our cats because whole prey is the most wholesome for the cats.) 

Rehab Bobcat Kitten Adult Phoenix

We have cameras on the outdoor enclosures, but not enough band width to open it up for public access.  Here is a screen capture:

Bobcat Kittens

Donate to big cats

 

This is just one section of their 5 section rehab run.

Rehab Bobcat Kittens 2015

Phoenix and Captiva ~ Rescued June 2015

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten
There are two more mouths to feed at Big Cat Rescue! Phoenix and Captiva are two little Florida bobcat kittens who both lost their moms recently in very different, but equally awful ways.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

Big Cat Rescue is a licensed bobcat rehabber here in Florida We plan to raise these guys at our sanctuary with as little human interaction as possible so they retain their wildness. When they are full grown, we will teach the kittens to hunt and release them back to the wild in a rural area of Florida.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

If you’d like to donate to the care and upbringing of these amazing kittens, click HERE.

 

Phoenix

Phoenix managed to live through a forest fire last week in Lee County, Florida.  Officials hoped to reunite the kitten with his mother, by leaving him near where he was found after an initial assessment that he seemed ok. But three days later, the kitten was dehydrated and still calling frantically for his mother, so he was sent on June 1 to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). Staff at CROW evaluated Phoenix and helped him recover well before delivering both kittens to Big Cat Rescue on June 25, 2015 for the next phase of their rehab for release.

Rehab-Bobcat-Kitten

We think there could be no more appropriate name than Phoenix, the mythological symbol who raises from the ashes to be reborn.

Here is a compilation of news stories about Phoenix:

 

June 1, 2015: The baby bobcat rescued from a massive brush fire in Lee County last week just underwent a physical at CROW – Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc. Staff says recovery is going well for the kitten. Click here to read more about the rescue: http://bit.ly/1GiR4xE

News updates http://www.nbc-2.com/story/29221676/bobcat-kitten-improves-despite-burns#.VXCyd1xVhBc

http://www.wptv.com/news/state/florida-bobcat-kitten-on-the-mend-after-rescue

 

Captiva

Rehab-BobcatThe larger kitten doesn’t have a name, and I am just using Captiva here as a holding space.

Captiva’s story is every bit as heart rending, but didn’t make the news.  She was the one Big Cat Rescue agreed to take first.  Gareth Johnson, the CROW Hospital Manager, worked with us a few years ago when we rehabbed and released bobcat Copter.  Gareth called Big Cat Rescue on June 1 to report that some people had trapped a bobcat kitten and then left it in the trap without food or water for a couple days before deciding they should feed her something.  Of course, they had no idea what to feed a 4-week-old nursing bobcat kitten, so what they fed her made her sick. Lucky for Captiva, they finally made a good decision and dropped her off at CROW.  The kitten was stabilized, despite the fact that she arrived in such bad shape no one thought that was possible.

CROW has state of the art medical facilities, but is not set up for bobcat rehab. Raising and rehabilitation a bobcat requires a lot of space and infrastructure.  Gareth called and asked if we would be able to take the little one.  I told him that I’d be happy to drive the 5-hour round trip to pick up the little darling.  Gareth wanted to do a SNAP test first and said he’d call me to come get her as soon as that was done.

Meanwhile Phoenix, the bobcat kitten who survived the forest fire, was directed by the Florida Wildlife Commission to be sent to CROW and he arrived that same evening, June 1.

 

More photos of Phoenix and Captiva

 

Phoenix-Rehab

Rehab-Bobcat_5427113543011086466_o Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-5 Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-4 Phoenix-Rehab-Bobcat-1
Phoenix and Captive Bobcats get two new friends!

http://bigcatrescue.org/4-bobcat-kittens/