JoJo

JoJo

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JoJo

Male DOB 1/1/03
Rescued 9/1/13
Caravel (Caracal / Serval Hybrid)

JoJo-Caravel_4628570305914395538_n

 

 

Meet Jo Jo the Caracal Serval Hybrid

 

JoJo the Caracal / Serval Hybrid

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I first met JoJo the Caracal / Serval hybrid at the South Florida Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in 2005 after a hurricane had taken down the perimeter fencing and dumped piles of deadfall on the cages.

JoJo hybrid 2012 Big Hiss

The owner, Dirk Neugebohm, had ended up in the hospital with a heart attack from trying to clean the mess up by himself.

 

He wrote from what he thought was his deathbed back then to anyone and everyone he could think of asking for help; and asking for help was not something that came easily to this hard working German.

Bird Caged Cats

What we found, when Howard and I visited, was a man who was way in over his head.  Donations were almost non existent, the cages were old, dilapidated, small and concrete floored.  The freezer had been damaged and he had lost his food supply, so we sent food and volunteers to help him clean up and rebuild.

The tiger back then was Sinbad, who lived in what is commonly used for housing parrots.  An oval corn crib cage with a metal roof.  Sinbad died recently after a snake bite, leaving Krishna, pictured, as the only remaining tiger.

Krishna Tiger

 

We had a donor and a sanctuary (Safe Haven in NV) that were willing to take Krishna, but we were told that the Florida Wildlife Commission had found someone less than 6 miles away to take him.

Dirk managed to keep his sanctuary afloat, if just barely, for the next 8 years, but a couple days ago one of his volunteers, Vickie Saez, who we had been helping for the past couple of years with infrastructure and social networking, contacted us to say that Dirk was dying of brain cancer in the hospital and that she had convinced him to let the animals go to other homes.   She said the Florida Wildlife Commission had arranged for most of the homes, but that Dirk was very happy that we could take JoJo.  Our sweet Caracal, Rose, had died July 31st and her cage was empty.

We were told that all of the other cats had new homes waiting, except for Nola the cougar, but she was very ill.  We offered to pay a vet to do blood work on her to make sure that she was not contagious.  We were concerned because she had a history of some very contagious diseases, which had left her severely debilitated.  What concerned us was that her caretaker said she looked bloated.

A vet had arrived to help with the transfer of two leopards to a place in Jupiter.  He sedated Nola to see what was wrong.

We are told that he palpitated three melon sized tumors in her abdomen and that with every touch of her belly she exuded foamy blood from her nose and anus.  He was sure that there was no hope for her and humanely euthanized her.

Nola cougar 2011

This photo was Nola back in 2011.  While we were sad that we would not be able to give Nola a new home here at Big Cat Rescue we are glad that she is not suffering any more.

 

JoJo at Big Cat Rescue

 

JoJo has arrived at Big Cat Rescue and settled in nicely.  It is quite possibly his first time to walk on the soft earth.

JoJo-at-Big-Cat-Rescue1

His cage has been a small (maybe 60 square feet) of concrete and chain link for at least 8 years and probably longer.  He is thought to be about 10 years old.  Sometimes breeders hybridize exotic cats because there are no laws on the books that regulate them, but in Florida, the inspectors say, “If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck; it’s a duck.”

JoJo-at-Big-Cat-Rescue2

JoJo now has 1,200 square feet of earth, bushes, trees and grass.

JoJo hybrid Grass Hide

He really likes the grass.  Are you hearing the Beetles lyric, “JoJo left his home in Homestead-Miami looking for some Florida grass?”

JoJo hybrid GrassClose Up

His diet has only been chicken necks for as far back as anyone can remember.  I think he is really going to like the menu at Big Cat Rescue.  You can help make rescues like this possible and help feed all of the cats at:  http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

 See More About JoJo:

JoJo the Caravel is up on his platform in this Wildcat Walkabout Video on May 1, 2014 – http://bigcatrescue.org/now-big-cat-rescue-may-2-2014/

Get the Meet JoJo iBook in iTunes

Meet another Caravel at the Wildcat Sanctuary

 

 

 

 

 

Fluffy

Fluffy

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hear big catsFluffy

Female Serval
DOB 6/16/93
Rescued  7/20/93
Fluffy came to Big Cat Rescue from Oregon as a result of the pet trade in July of 1993. Fluffy was always been extremely affectionate until she became an adult.

Servals are great hunters and fishers and she found much more happiness in a natural enclosure filled with trees, palmetto bushes and logs to investigate.

She is quite shy and will usually retreat to the cover of foliage when her enclosure is approached by keepers. However, she is a cat and curiosity always gets the better of her causing her to come out into the open to observe nearby activity.

 

 

Sponsor Fluffy http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/products/serval-sponsorship

 

Serval Facts

Serval Facts

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Serval

 

Sarah2.jpg (130951 bytes)Common Name: Serval
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata (Vertebrata)
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Felidae
Genus: Felinae (Leptailurus)
Species: Serval (L.s. constantina)
Barbary Serval thought to now be Extinct

Misc: The name Serval is derived from a Portuguese word meaning “wolf-deer.”

Size and Appearance: Often referred to as the cat of spare parts, this unusual, but beautiful cat is among the feline family’s most successful. It has a small, delicate head and extremely large ears set on an elongated neck, long slim legs (hind legs longer than front), long slender body and a short tail. The ears are black on the back with a distinctive white spot, and the tail has 6 or 7 black rings and a black tip. The coat color is pale yellow with black markings, either of large spots that tend to merge into longitudinal stripes on the neck and back, or of numerous small spots, which give a speckled appearance. These “speckled” Servals from west Africa – called servalines – used to be considered a separate species Felis brachyura, until it was demonstrated that the speckled pattern was just a variation or “morph”.

Habitat: Servals are found in well-watered savannah long-grass environments, and are associated with reed beds and other riparian vegetation types. They occupy a variety of habitats all associated with water sources, they range up into alpine grasslands and can penetrate deep dense forests along waterways and through grassy patches, but are absent from rain forests. They will make use of arid areas in extreme instances, and have occasionally done so in parts of south-western Africa.

Distribution: sub-Saharan Africa, with small populations in south-west Africa, and a reported relict population in North Africa (no recent sightings confirmed).

Reproduction and Offspring: After a gestation of approximately 73 days, females produce a litter of 1-5 kittens, with 2 being the average. They weigh in at around 8.5-9 ounces at birth, and it will take 9-12 days until their eyes open. They begin to take solid foods around the age of 3 weeks, and are independent between 6-8 months, but may remain in their natal ranges. They attain sexual maturity between 18-24 months, and it is at this time that they will be forced out of their mother’s territory.

In captivity, Servals have lived past 20 years at Big Cat Rescue and up to 19 years in other facilities.

Social System and Communication: Servals are solitary animals, and social interactions are limited to periods of mating. Each sex maintains its own territory. Hear our chirps, purrs, hisses, snarls, calls, and growl sounds HERE

Serval at Big Cat RescueHunting and Diet: Much like the big bad wolf in “Little Red Riding Hood” the Servals big ears are “the better to hear you with!” The serval’s sensitive hearing allows it to locate small mammals moving through the grass or underground, and to hunt its prey sometimes without seeing it until the final pounce. It also has the ability to leap vertically and catch prey such as birds, right out of the air. They do this by “clapping” with their front paws together and striking with a downward blow. Primary prey items for the Serval includes rodents, birds, reptiles, fish, frogs and insects. Servals have a hunting success rate of 50%.

Principal Threats: the main threats to Servals are leopards, dogs, and of course, man. Because of their beautiful pelage, they are a prime target for poachers. Their skins are sold as young leopards or cheetahs, which are much scarcer. The pelt trade for they are sold is mostly for domestic ceremonial, medicinal purposes or the tourist trade rather than for commercial export. There is also the issue of preserving the land that makes up their homeland, which is destroyed by human encroachment or from annual burning of grasslands. Some tribes hunt and kill the Serval for their flesh, which is considered a delicacy.

Status: CITES: Appendix II. IUCN: Not listed.

Felid TAG recommendation: Serval (Leptailurus serval). Common in nature and captivity, this species is important for institutions with zoogeographic themes, as well as for educational uses. Most specimens probably can be traced to a subspecies. Currently, there are more servals in zoos than recommended by the RCP. The PMP target population is 80 individuals. 91% of the population is of unknown origin and not suitable for breeding. The first stud book ever was published for this species in 2003.

How rare is this cat? The International Species Information Service lists 292 in zoos worldwide, with 130 being in the U.S.

 

 

Information reprinted With Permission from the IUCN Wild Cats Book.

 

 

Servals of BCR

Meet our serval friends:

http://bigcatrescue.org/catbio/

Serengetti

Serengetti

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Serengetti

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Female Serval
DOB 9/16/96 – 4/10/2015

 

Serengeti and Kalahari became unwanted pets after their owners divorced. Even people with the best intentions are not usually prepared for the life time commitment involved in owning an exotic cat. Serengeti is distinctively larger than her sister Kalahari. Serengeti is very quite and keeps to herself.

Serengetti was euthanized in April 2015 after discovering that her liver was full of cancerous tumors that could not be removed due to their entanglement with the blood supply, organs and surrounding tissue.  Her sister, Kalahari, has the same issue, but her cancer was limited to her reproductive tract, so we were able to remove it and hope to give her a few more years.

You can read tributes to Serengetti Serval at https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/serengetti-serval

Most of our servals were rescued from people who got them as pets and were not prepared for the fact that male or female, altered or not, they all spray buckets of urine when they become adults. Some were being sold at auction where taxidermists would buy them and club them to death in the parking lot, but a few were born here in the early days when we were ignorant of the truth and were being told by the breeders and dealers that these cats should be bred for “conservation.” Once we learned that there are NO captive breeding programs that actually contribute to conservation in the wild we began neutering and spaying our cats in the mid 1990’s.  Knowing what we do about the intelligence and magnificence of these creatures we do not believe that exotic cats should be bred for lives in cages. Read more about our Evolution of Thought

 

 

More about Serengeti

 

Kalahari and Serengeti are two sister servals who were born here back in 1996 and are now part of the reason that we no longer breed exotic cats.  At the time they were born we had two volunteers who were married to each other and who were a couple of the most dedicated volunteers we had at the time.  Their names were John and Penny and they were people we could always depend on for cleaning cages, feeding the cats, giving tours and doing outreach.  There didn’t want children and were wholly committed to helping protect exotic cats in any way they knew how.  I could not have asked for a more dynamic team.

When Kalahari and Serengeti were born, John and Penny made their pitch for why they would be be the best home possible for the two youngsters.  Their intention was to raise them with the kind of doting love and attention that two full time parents could give.  They would be so confidant and socialized that they would be comfortable going out to schools and civic events as “ambassadors” to teach people about why we need to protect wild cats and wild places.  Back then we didn’t realise that such “ambassadors” only cause people to want them as pets and are thus counter productive to the mission.

John would rave to us about all of the new tricks he had taught “their girls” and the rest of us kind of lived vicariously through his stories because he never actually brought “the girls” out for us to visit any more.  They never did, to my recollection, take “the girls” out into the public as intended, but I believed they were loved and cherished and that was good enough for me.  The two servals were raised until they were two or three years old;  about the time that they became mature and were no longer fun and handleable as pets.

Then John and Penny divorced.  They quit volunteering.  Neither felt the other was an appropriate parent to “the girls” so they asked if I would take them back.  Of course we did, but the only family they had ever known was John and Penny so they were not friendly to our keepers initially and didn’t enjoy visitors.  That is why they aren’t on the tour path and why a lot of you have probably never even met them.

Serval Sisters

Serval Sisters

Kalahari has a heart problem and has to be given two types of meds every day and has had to be tended to by our current vet care staff for the past 10-11 years.  The people who had vowed to be there for her and Serengeti aren’t there any more, but current Big Cat Rescuers are.  Their story is just one of hundreds that we tell about why even the smaller exotic cats never work out as pets.

No one had more time invested in caring for servals that John and Penny did at the time of their adoption.  They had seen lots of other servals go from being cute and cuddly kittens who grew up into spitting, hissing servals.  They thought they were different.  They thought they could do it better and I believed it too. I really thought the love and attention they would give these two would be far above what I could offer here, with volunteers who come and go, and I thought that they would have a forever home.

There were a lot of cats here, mostly those who were rescued from fur farms, some who were born here, that I put into what I thought were loving and forever homes, but almost all of those cats have come home to us.  It is the family that makes up Big Cat Rescue who turn out to be the safety net for these cats and for those we rescue.  As I watch huge sanctuaries get in over their heads and fail, I am ever reminded that we have to be smarter, more diligent and more accountable to each other than ever before if we are to be able to provide the forever home that is Big Cat Rescue.

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Mar 2 2013 on NatGeo Wild

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Big Cat Attacks and the Big Cat Club

 

http://youtu.be/7HvGi5apL14

 

Zabu at 2:56, can you pick out our other big cat stars?

NatGeoWildBigCatAttacks2013a NatGeoWildBigCatAttacks2013b