Apollo

Apollo

 

Apollo

Male Siberian Lynx
DOB 5/1/97
Rescued 6/24/97

Apollo the Siberian Lynx at Big Cat RescueApollo arrived at Big Cat Rescue with Zeus from a Canadian fur farm on 6/24/97.  Big Cat Rescue started in 1992 with the rescue of a single bobcat, named Windsong, which led to rescuing 56 bobcats and lynx the next year from a fur farm.  More than 100 exotic cats were rescued from being turned into fur coats under the agreement that Big Cat Rescue would pay top dollar for every cat if the fur farmers would stop breeding cats for their fur.

To our knowledge, there are no fur farms in the U.S. that still raise cats for fur and we were trying to end that practice in Canada with the rescue of Apollo and Zeus, back in 1997.

When Apollo arrived he had severe parasite issues, however, with good veterinary care and a nutritionally balanced diet he made major improvements very quickly.

He and his friend Zeus share a large shady enclosure. Although, you would not normally find two adult male lynxes living together in the wild, in captivity this is actually a form of enrichment, if they have been raised together.

They play together, groom each other, stalk ducks together and even sleep curled up next to each other. They have a habit of puffing air out of their noses when agitated, especially at feeding time. This behavior has earned them the nickname of “The Hufflepuffs.”

Sponsor Apollo here http://big-cat-rescue.myshopify.com/collections/sponsor-a-cat

Fur Farm Survivors

Lynx Fur Farm Survivors

Big Cat Rescue has already bought out every U.S. fur farm known to us and we would like to do the same with the Canadian ones. We determined, however, that in order to purchase the cats remaining at the known Canadian farm, and build barely adequate caging for them, it would have cost over $95,000. back in 1997.  Since then we have determined that we cannot rescue our way out of this problem and are devoting time and energy to changing laws to protect the animals.  Visit www.CatLaws.com to help.

 

Zeus

Zeus

Zeus

Male Siberian Lynx
DOB 5/1/97-4/14/16
Rescued 6/24/97

Zeus the Siberian Lynx at Big Cat RescueZeus was rescued from a fur farm.

He and Apollo, another fur farm survivor, share a large habitat. Although, you would not normally find two adult male Lynxes living together in the wild, in captivity this is actually a form of enrichment, if they have been raised together.

They play together, groom each other, stalk ducks together and even sleep curled up next to each other. They have a habit of puffing air out of their noses when agitated, especially at feeding time. This behavior has earned them the nickname of “The Hufflepuffs.”

Big Cat Rescue started in 1992 with the rescue of a single bobcat, named Windsong, which led to rescuing 56 bobcats and lynx the next year from a fur farm.  More than 100 exotic cats were rescued from being turned into fur coats under the agreement that Big Cat Rescue would pay top dollar for every cat if the fur farmers would stop breeding cats for their fur.

To our knowledge, there are no fur farms in the U.S. that still raise cats for fur.

 

 

 

 

 

Big Cat Rescue has already bought out every U.S. fur farm known to us and we would like to do the same with the Canadian ones. We determined, however, that in order to purchase the cats remaining at the known Canadian farm, and build barely adequate caging for them, it would have cost over $95,000. back in 1997.  Since then we have determined that we cannot rescue our way out of this problem and are devoting time and energy to changing laws to protect the animals.

Visit www.CatLaws.com to help.

 

Now at Big Cat Rescue Feb 13 2015

Now at Big Cat Rescue Feb 13 2015

Fun Photos on Friday the 13th

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Andi Bobcat up in her tree at Big Cat Rescue

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Vernon Stairs posts new tour sign at Big Cat Rescue

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Little Dove Bobcat peeks out of her den at Big Cat Rescue

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Natasha Lynx enjoys a spice bag a few weeks ago at Big Cat w

Aspen Echo Cougar strikes a pose at Big Cat Rescue

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Aspen Echo looks so regal in front of her cave den at Big Cat Rescue

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Do you look at your cat, with half closed eye, to show your love?

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Tonga the White Serval still doing well, years after cancer was removed from his nose.

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Tonga the White Serval gets ready for his role as the Easter Bunny

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Mickey the cougar, who had torn ACLs in both back legs will get second surgery soon.

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Mickey the cougar has improved in his ability to use the knee repaired by Dr. Callum Hay.

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A big shout out from Mickey Cougar to everyone who helped him get the first surgery.

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…and a plea, from Mickey Cougar to help fund the second ACL surgery.

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Angelica Bobcat caught just before breaking into a huge yawn.

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Thurston and Lovey napping in their tree house at Big Cat Rescue.

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Genie Sandcat sees no reason to leave her heated Skippy Bed for the photographer.

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Narla Cougar regrets the cat nip binge from last night at Big Cat Rescue.

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Gale Ingham shows a painting of Windsong Bobcat by Intern Julia Doane.

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Canvas prints of our cats were donated by Vanessa Fernandez & family for sale in our gift shop.

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The gorgeous canvas prints hang in the office as they sell one at a time in the gift shop.

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The eyes over the door are not for sale, but the beautiful leopard on the right is.

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See which ones are still available at www.BigCatRescue.biz

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This is the staff meeting room at Big Cat Rescue.

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Our Keepers all wear radios while on property and these radio speakers are in & on the buildings.

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Jennifer Leon and our Legislative Interns keep this area looking nice where guests are able to speak out for the cats.

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Ariel Bobcat has been moved from rehab to her permanent cage, but is still a little shy.

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Moms and kittens enjoy the expert care by our Interns in the FosteringIsCool.com program.

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Vern uses a drill, found by Dr. Justin and Jamie, to tie on the 9 gauge wires.

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Doing that by hand would just wring your wrists off!

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Vern attaches the sign to the front of the Windsong Memorial Hospital.

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Andi Bobcat does her best hoot owl im-purr-sonation.

Natasha

Natasha

hear big cats

NATASHA

Female Siberian Lynx

DOB 5/5/93 – 2/2/15

Rescued 9/19/93

 

Siberian Lynx at Big Cat RescueNatasha (on left) was rescued, along with 27 other cats, from a fur farm. She cost more than any of the other cats because she is exquisitely beautiful. She has survived poisoning and a very scary seizure in 1996. She was diagnosed with heart worms in 1997 and recovered very slowly. We had never seen heartworms in the exotic cats, and as a result of her infestation have made it a policy to treat all of Big Cat Rescue’s animals with Ivermectin, which is a de-wormer, as a preventative.

Natasha shared a Cat-a-tat with Willow and they loved each others company. One of Natasha’s favorite things to do is chew. She, like most Siberian lynx, have a love for chewing. She will chew just about anything, sticks, pine cones, cardboard tubes, but her favorite of all are pineapple tops. She does not eat these things, but rather tears off tiny pieces of them with her front teeth and then spits it out. She will continue with this until there is nothing left of whatever item fell victim to her chewing. Natasha is lovable and fun-loving and considers no one a stranger.

She was raised with Willow and Alexander, the bobcat hybrid, and still remains one of the friendliest cats here. She shared her large grassy habitat with Willow until her death in 2013. Ironically, they were often seen lying in the sun grooming each other’s beautiful fur coats.

 

 

Big Cat Rescue has already bought out every U.S. fur farm known to us and we would like to do the same with the Canadian ones. We determined, however, that in order to purchase the cats remaining at the known Canadian farm, and build barely adequate caging for them, it would have cost over $95,000. back in 1997.  Since then we have determined that we cannot rescue our way out of this problem and are devoting time and energy to changing laws to protect the animals.  Visit www.CatLaws.com to help.

Visit Natasha’s Tribute page here:  https://sites.google.com/site/bigcattributes/home/natasha-lynx

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 11 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 11 2013

Goodbye to Willow the Siberian Lynx

 

Willow Siberian LynxFemale Siberian Lynx

DOB 5/6/94 1/3/2013

Arrived at Big Cat Rescue 6/1/94

 

Willow (on right) was born at a fur farm in Canada. We had bought all of the kittens the farm had and they were shipped here in crates so small that the kittens could not move. The little wire crates appeared to be full of sticky, smelly gray fur. We opened the crates and pulled out the contents, and found a group of soiled, starving, sick and stressed little kittens. None of them died in transit, which was a astounding, considering the condition in which they had arrived, but sadly several did not survive long after. Willow was always one of the skinniest and willowiest of the group and thus her name. She was raised with Natasha and Alexander, the bobcat hybrid, and still remains one of the friendliest cats here. She shared her large grassy habitat with Natasha. Ironically, they were often seen lying in the sun grooming each other’s beautiful fur coats.

 

Like all wild cats, Willow was stoic and showed no signs of being ill until she refused her food one night. The next day she seemed just too tired and stiff to move so she was taken in to the vet where she was found to be in the final stages of renal failure. She made it clear that she was ready to go. Natasha sleeps most of the time now and is a year older than Willow. When she is awake she seems to be looking for her old friend from her resting spot. We are heartbroken at the loss of Willow and even more so, to see Natasha looking so sad.

 

 

Today at Big Cat Rescue Jan 11 2013

 

Safe-Capture International will be returning to Georgia & Florida

 

with the 16 hour workshop “Chemical Immobilization of Animals” at the following locations:

 

Georgia: Athens: UGA College of Veterinary Medicine: February 23-24, 2013

 

Florida: Kissimmee: Holiday Inn Main Gate East: September 18-19, 2013

 

***This program will extensively cover immobilization techniques in

Exotic and Native Cats, Wolves, and other Carnivores***

 

 

Use this link to access Detailed Presentation Outlines: http://www.safecapture.com/New/zoo&exotic.html

 

Instructor information, printable registration forms and electronic registration are available on our website: www.safecapture.com Brochures containing all workshop details and registration materials are also available by telephone (608-767-3071) or e-mail (safecaptur@aol.com) request.

 

Our training program is presented over a 2 day period. It consists of 14 hours of multimedia/ lecture/ PowerPoint/ video presentation, followed by 2 hours of “Hands On” training where participants are divided into small groups and are taught how to safely use blowguns, long range projectors, darts, human protective safety equipment, and dart associated radio-tracking devices.

 

Topics to be discussed will include:

 

· Custom drug combinations and formulations which minimize induction times–the time from dart impact until the animal is immobilized. (Dr. Amass has drug combinations and techniques that will safely and rapidly limit the escape potential of most animals within 64 seconds to 3.5 minutes).

· Proper injection sites to ensure rapid drug absorption and effects

· Capture strategies to minimize capture stress on the animal, and procedural stress of the operator

· Advantages and disadvantages of the various commercially available darting systems

· Techniques for sighting in dart projectors to ensure accurate, atraumatic dart delivery

· Techniques and modifications which are necessary to have field accuracy and consistent results with currently manufactured darting systems and radiotracking devices.

· The latest in safe, practical species specific and scenario specific drug and dosage recommendations

· Dosage calculation

· How to re-dose animals incompletely immobilized on approach

· Where to obtain and how to use “superconcentrated” drugs which give you a faster knockdown, and allow you to use smaller, less traumatic darts

· Post immobilization care of animals

· Medical Monitoring: Assessment techniques to ensure the immobilized animal stays physiologically stable throughout the procedure

· Medical Emergencies associated with capture and handling: How to prevent, recognize, and treat: capture myopathy, shock, hyperthermia, hypothermia, seizures, and other complications which can be avoided and managed in association with immobilization

· Accidental human exposure to immobilizing medications: Which drugs are dangerous to humans? What can you expect with accidental human exposure? Standard Operating Procedures to prevent human exposure to immobilizing drugs. How to coordinate with your physician and local poison control to develop protocols should an accidental exposure occur.

Hands-On Lab will include:

 

Safe Handling and Use of Immobilization Darts: Assembly, loading, unloading, and cleaning of the various brands available in the US.

Use of Safety Equipment for Prevention of Accidental Exposure to Anesthetic Drugs

Safe Handling and Use of Short and Long Range Projectors including: CO2, Air, and 22 blank powered projectors

Practice and Development of Proficiency with Pole Syringes

Practice and Development of Proficiency with Blowgun Delivery of Anesthetic Darts

Practice and Development of Proficiency with Radio-Tracking Darts.

Our program has been presented since 1989, and is considered by US government agencies to be the standard in Chemical Immobilization training. We have provided training to well over 10,000 professionals in the US, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Canada including the Beardsley Zoo, Audubon Park Zoo, Folsom City Zoo, Dallas World Aquarium, Dallas Zoo, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Merck and Co., Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project, Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, New Jersey Fish and Wildlife, Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries, Texas Parks and Wildlife, New York Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, US Fish and Wildlife Service-Alaska, USDA Wildlife Services, Beijing Biodiversity Center, Animal Rescue League of Boston, New York ASPCA, Virginia Animal Control Association, Rappahannock Regional Criminal Justice Academy, Essex County College Police Academy, Greater Orlando Aviation Authority and a multitude of others.

 

We provide evaluation questionnaires to course participants asking for ratings of Excellent, Good, Satisfactory or Disappointing. Over 90% of participants have rated our program excellent! The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources, Utah State University, and Oregon State University have granted our program 1 academic credit.

 

We do not sell equipment, nor do we have contracts with equipment manufacturers. We provide only education in Chemical Immobilization and field assistance, and our recommendations for drugs and equipment stem from practical field use. Our instructors are Zoo/Wildlife Veterinarians specializing in remote anesthesia. They are internationally recognized experts, who are friendly, experienced, easy to talk to, welcome questions, and have the answers you need. This is the most complete, up to date training program available on Chemical Immobilization, presented in an easy to understand manner, applicable to all experience levels.

 

This is a completely revised and updated program. The all new 175-page manual:

“Chemical Immobilization of Animals: Technical Field Notes 2013” will be distributed at this workshop!

 

Certificates are awarded to those satisfactorily completing the program.

 

Cost for this workshop is $645 for early registration and $695 for general registration. Those who have attended our workshop previously may attend again as a refresher for $395.

 

For more information visit our website at www.safecapture.com or contact us at:

 

Safe-Capture International, Inc., PO Box 206, Mount Horeb, Wisconsin 53572

Tel: 608-767-3071, FAX: 608-767-3072, E-Mail: safecaptur@aol.com