Today at Big Cat Rescue Sept 9 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Sept 9 2013

“Silent Killer” Health Problems Increasingly Affecting Cats

 

Warns Veterinarians

 

KittensCuddle

 

All About Cats Veterinary Hospital is warning cat owners that “silent killer” health problems are common for cats of all ages, including those in their prime. While it may be common knowledge that humans need regular health screenings to detect underlying disease, cat owners may be surprised to learn that the same is true for cats. Just as humans receive regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks, the cat clinic recommends that cats receive similar wellness care exams to detect illnesses that may not yet be showing obvious signs. These exams evaluate a cat’s health and allow for early intervention and treatment.

 

All About Cats Veterinary Hospital is reminding cat owners that regular wellness exams are essential for feline health. So-called feline “silent killer” illnesses include high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney disease, thyroid disease, diabetes and even cancer.

 

Not all cat owners realize that annual exams are important for cats, including those that appear healthy and active” said Las Vegas veterinarian Dr. Terri Koppe. “Cats are masters at hiding the symptoms of illness. Consequently, symptoms may not become evident until it is too late to effectively treat them.”

 

The cat hospital recommends proactive wellness care to identify and treat problems before a cat’s health is compromised. Wellness care exams start with a consultation with the veterinarian which includes a nutrition assessment and includes a complete physical exam from head to tail. The cat clinic then tailors testing recommendations to a cat’s life stage.

 

“There are six distinct feline life stages,” said Las Vegas veterinarian Dr. Alissa McCormick. “At each stage, cats require proactive veterinary care.”

 

Current guidelines from the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) recognize six distinct feline life stages. The kitten period is from birth to six months; junior cats are from six months to two years; prime is from three to six years; mature is seven to ten years; senior is 11 to 14 years; and geriatric is 15 years or older.

 

The cat hospital recommends wellness exams, diagnostic tests, and weight management for every feline life stage. For example, weight gain is a problem for many older cats, says the cat clinic, and can lead to additional health complications. Nutrition and weight management services help to set the stage for long-term feline health.

 

In addition to educating cat owners about the importance of feline wellness care, the clinic also announced that it is offering discounted wellness exams and screening tests.

 

“We have bundled and discounted the screening tests for each life stage to be affordable for cat owners,” said Las Vegas veterinarian Dr. Terri Koppe. “Just as humans have tests at certain stages, such as mammograms and colonoscopies, cats need health screenings through the course of their life stages too.”

 

Cat owners may learn more about discounted wellness exams by visiting

http://allaboutcatsonline.com  All About Cats Veterinary Hospital 888-667-5235

Today at Big Cat Rescue Aug 6 2013

Today at Big Cat Rescue Aug 6 2013

Bella Tiger Has Biopsy

http://bigcatrescue.org/bella/ 

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Dr Wynn and Dr Boorstein draw blood, perform a biopsy and give Bella Tiger a check up.

 

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Dr Wynn checks for signs of arthritis in Bella Tiger.

 

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Two bags of fluids are given to help boost the way Bella Tiger feels.

 

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This padded pole is lightly held over Bella Tiger in case she wakes up unexpectedly.

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Bella Tiger is weighed, throughly checked over, and a biopsy is performed on a mass.

 

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The blood work and biopsy will be sent out for testing to let us know what we should do next.

 

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The area is cleansed to prevent infection.

 

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Bella weighs a little over 200lbs.  She is a tiny tiger.

 

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Carrying Bella the tiger into the shade to wake up.

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Zeutering or Zootering

Z IS FOR ZEUTERING OR ZOOTERING

however you spell it…

 

The Animal Health Center now offers Zeutering, an FDA approved, non-surgical method of neutering male dogs without the use of anesthesia, that leaves the testicles intact.

 

Benefits of Zeutering:

  • Less expensive than traditional surgery
  • No anesthesia required
  • Little recovery time
  • No irritation
  • No stitches
  • Males retain up to 50% of their testosterone
  • Males remain “in tact”

Last month, certification training for the new procedure was offered at the Animal Health Center to local veterinarians and veterinary technicians. Watch news coverage of the training!

Note our very own Dr. Justin Boorstein

in this photo, second from L in the back.

Charlie, our first Zeutering patient, receives sedation from Dr. Christine Glenn before his procedure.

 

 

Just moments after being Zeutered, Charlie is alert, comfortable and ready to go!

 

The Animal Health Center now offers Zeutering! Call 813.870.3304 for more information.

Today at Big Cat Rescue May 31

Today at Big Cat Rescue May 31

A Roller Coaster Ride of Emotions

 

Taking care of more than 100 exotic cats is a roller coaster ride of emotions as we try to provide the best possible life for them and yet deal with the gut wrenching decisions of life an death every day.  Of our 109 wild cats 100 of them are over the age of 12, which is about as long as they live in zoos or in the wild.  An amazing 80 of those 100 cats are over the age of 15.  Today we lost a gorgeous 17 year old bobcat after removing a tumor in an attempt to save his life.  More at the bottom of this page.

 

 

Bailey the bobcat watches Interns cleaning the tiger ponds

Bailey the bobcat watches Interns cleaning the tiger ponds

Interns scrub the tiger ponds and spill ways

Interns scrub the tiger ponds and spill ways

 

Cameron the lion heads into the cool of his cave

Cameron the lion heads into the cool of his cave

Zabu the white tiger leads the way to their cave

Zabu the white tiger leads the way to their cave

Lion and tiger kissing behind the tiger toy

Lion and tiger kissing behind the tiger toy

Volunteers and Interns filming our next fun video of lions and tigers

Volunteers and Interns filming our next fun video of lions and tigers

The toy soccer ball (cardboard) after being dunked in the pool

The toy soccer ball (cardboard) after being dunked in the pool

Chris filming Shere Khan and China Doll

Chris filming Shere Khan and China Doll

Skipaholics donate trees and plants to Big Cat Rescue

Skipaholics donate trees and plants to Big Cat Rescue

Cameron the lion and Zabu the white tiger playing w/ toys by pond

Cameron the lion and Zabu the white tiger playing w/ toys by pond

Interns help Skipaholics plant huge trees down by the lake bank

Interns help Skipaholics plant huge trees down by the lake bank

Natasha and Willow the Siberian Lynx are never far from each other

Natasha and Willow the Siberian Lynx are never far from each other

It's good to have a friend who is always there for you.  I have many.

It's good to have a friend who is always there for you. I have many.

Dr. Boorstein vaccinating a tiger while he is distracted with treats

Dr. Boorstein vaccinating a tiger while he is distracted with treats

Gale distracts tiger so Dr. Boorstein can give him his vaccines

Gale distracts tiger so Dr. Boorstein can give him his vaccines

Double Cat-a-comb is needed for extra large lock outs

Double Cat-a-comb is needed for extra large lock outs

Cameron the lion falls asleep in lockout waiting for dinner time

Cameron the lion falls asleep in lockout waiting for dinner time

Jumanji the black leopard is one of the first cats to greet guests

Jumanji the black leopard is one of the first cats to greet guests

Heather and Dr. Wynn preparing Crazy Horse for surgery

Heather and Dr. Wynn preparing Crazy Horse for surgery

Dr. Wynn discovers a bad tooth that may be keeping him from eating well

Dr. Wynn discovers a bad tooth that may be keeping him from eating well

Crazy Horse the bobcat has gained half a pound since his last visit

Crazy Horse the bobcat has gained half a pound since his last visit

The mass is the size of an orange in Crazy Horse's armpit

The mass is the size of an orange in Crazy Horse's armpit

Dr. Wynn checks for other masses while Crazy Horse is sedated

Dr. Wynn checks for other masses while Crazy Horse is sedated

The rotten tooth is extracted before waking Crazy Horse up

The rotten tooth is extracted before waking Crazy Horse up

Crazy Horse the Bobcat

 

Thanks to some of the very best volunteers in the industry and the processes we have in place for noting changes in our cats, Crazy Horse was observed to be off his food and acting strange about 3 weeks ago.  To look at him, you couldn’t see the mass in his armpit, until he was sedated and laid out on his back.  The mass was the size of a grapefruit, and was purple and red from infection.  We sent out samples for testing, but were pretty sure the results would come back as cancer.  We wondered if it would be kinder to him to just put him out of his misery right then, rather than wait for test results and subject him to being confined in the Cat Hospital.  At the age of 17 we feared his life would soon be cut short and we were torn as to what would be best for Crazy Horse.  We opted to wait a few days and see.

 

The tests came back mixed.  Three tests.  Three different results.

 

Meanwhile he had been on antibiotics for the infection and living in the West Boensch, onsite Cat Hospital, under the very vigilant watch of the Skip A Holics and our staff.  We thought he would try to kill himself to escape the hospital cages, but turned out to be a very patient patient.  He got his name because he is about half crazy and has never liked being anywhere near people.

 

About a week ago he was re evaluated by the vets to see if the antibiotics had helped.  The swelling had gone down to about the size of an orange and all of the red and purple coloring had returned to healthy flesh tones.  He seemed to be on the mend, but we still didn’t know if the mass were an abscess or cancer.

 

On May 31 we took him in to see Dr. Wynn at the Ehrlich Animal Hospital.  We had some cause to be hopeful, as he appeared to have gained a little weight, but he had been refusing to eat off a plate.  He would only eat if fed from a stick, so we wondered if perhaps the mass was putting pressure against his throat or chest and causing the discomfort.  As you can see in the photos above, the mass had continued to shrink a bit.  It was the size of a small orange and moved pretty freely, so Dr. Wynn felt that she could surgically remove the mass, and we opted to try.

 

Three hours later, the mass had been separated from all of the muscle and blood supply lines, and the incision was sewn and stapled shut.  I have a picture of the mass, which was the size of Dr. Wynn’s palm, but it was just too gruesome to post here.  During the exam Dr. Wynn had discovered a bad tooth, so as soon as Crazy Horse’s armpit was sewn up he was rushed to another surgery suite to have the tooth removed and a flap made over the hole.  To keep him from chewing at the staples, which come out in a week or so, he was fitted with an e collar.  The mass is being sent out again to see if we can get consistent results this time on the whole thing instead of just the biopsies.

 

We don’t know how much time this has bought for Crazy Horse.  We are always ambivalent about these kinds of procedures.  On the one hand, cancer is often an exotic cat’s get-out-of-jail-free card because we don’t want to submit them to traumatic surgery, nauseating cancer treatment drugs and only have them live a few months in misery.  On the other hand we have removed tumors and had cats live another year of a pretty good life where they seemed happy up until the end.  It’s always a tough call and we make each one based upon what we believe would be in the best interest of the cat involved.

 

We appreciate that your support makes it possible for us to make those hard decisions entirely upon the best interest of the cat and not out of a lack of funding or a lack of understanding.

 

Just as I finished writing this our Operations Manager, Gale Ingham, called me to tell me that Crazy Horse the bobcat has died.  And now I sit here wondering; did we do the right thing?  Should we have put him to sleep three weeks ago?  Did we just make his last three weeks miserable by keeping inside the Cat Hospital?  Or did we all have to go through all of the past 3 weeks and the surgery to make sure we were doing the right thing for Crazy Horse?  If he had lived another year, we would have been glad to have done it, but to have him die so soon only adds to the pain involved in making this decision for him and for others in the future.