Cougars confirmed in Louisiana – escaped "pets"?

LDWF confirms cougar sightings, says they are second and third ever in Louisiana

News-Star news services – October 10, 2008

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has received photographic evidence of the second and third documented cougar occurrences in the state in recent history.

Private citizens sent trail camera pictures from two different sites to the department in September. LDWF Large Carnivore Program Manager Maria Davidson and LDWF Natural Heritage Zoologist Beau Gregory then conducted site investigations that confirmed the authenticity of the photographs.

“The department interviewed the photo providers and investigated the sites and photographs. After inspecting all of the evidence, we have concluded with the best of our abilities that the photos are in fact real and of a cougar,” Davidson said.

The first photograph was taken in Natchitoches parish on Sept. 4, and the second was taken in Allen parish on Sept. 29. The sites are approximately 100 miles apart, leading to speculation that the same cougar could be in both photos.

“Given the time lapse between the two pictures it is certainly possible for a cougar to have traveled that distance,” Davidson said. “Both animals have the same general appearance of a young cougar, but it is impossible to determine conclusively if the animals are one and the same. It is also impossible to determine if the animals in the photographs are wild free-ranging mountain lions, or escaped captives.”

Although it is illegal to own a cougar in Louisiana, it is possible that there are some illegally held “pets” in the state. Anyone holding a captive cougar in Louisiana must have a permit issued by LDWF, as captive cougars may compromise public safety. LDWF may issue permits to existing owners in the state in order to reduce difficulties associated with determining the validity of reported cougar sightings.

The mountain lion, cougar, panther or puma are names that all refer to the same animal. Their color ranges from lighter tan to brownish grey.

The only species of big cats that occur as black are the jaguar and leopard. Jaguars are native to South America and leopards are native to Africa. Both species can occur as spotted or black, although in both cases the spotted variety is much more common. Although the department receives numerous calls about “black panthers”, there has never been a documented case of a black cougar anywhere in North America.

The first recently documented cougar sighting was in 2002 by LDWF Program Manager Michael Carloss on Lake Fausse Point State Park. That sighting was later confirmed with DNA analysis from scat found at the site.

The department receives many calls reporting sightings of cougars throughout Louisiana. The vast majority of these reports cannot be verified due to the very nature of a sighting. These animals can move through an area and leave little or no evidence to be found.

Many of the calls are found to be cases of mistaken identity. Dog tracks make up the majority of the evidence submitted by those reporting cougar sightings. Other animals commonly mistaken for cougars are bobcats and house cats, usually seen from a distance or in varying shades of light.

The significant lack of physical evidence leads the department to conclude that Louisiana does not have an established, breeding population of cougars. In states that have verified small populations of cougars, physical evidence can readily be found in the form of tracks, cached deer kills, scat and road kills.

The recent occurrences of cougars in Louisiana may be young animals dispersing from existing populations in west Texas. An expanding population in west Texas can produce dispersing individual cougars that move into suitable habitat in Louisiana. Young males are known to disperse from their birthplace and travel hundreds of miles seeking their own territories.

Cougars that occur in Louisiana are protected under state and federal law. Penalties for taking a cougar in Louisiana may include up to one year in jail and/or a $100,000 fine. Anyone with any information regarding the taking of a cougar should call LA Operation Game Thief, inc. at 1-800-442-2511. Callers may remain anonymous and may receive a cash reward.

http://www.thenewsstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081010/SPORTS11/81010009

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  • Show Comments (4)

  • Susan E Pl

    I saw one on the side of the road in New Orleans near Michoud. Hit by a car on I 10 yeasterday. June 24 2014

     
  • Tami Walton Shaw

    7/27/2014 Posted from Lost Pets Of Livingston Parish
    25 minutes ago
    REPORT!!! MOUNTAIN LION SPOTTED!!!

    "Just want to let everyone know A mountain lion was spotted in walker south area by hammock road. It came right up to my neighbors back door. Keep an eye on ur pets and children!!"

     
  • Timothy Hunter

    i seen one big brown cougar thursday comming back from georgetown on 1230 about 7 miles from georgetown this big cat ran accoss the road at full run , heading toward 167 north

     
  • Chloe C Boullion

    On Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 01:14:37 AM, captured a COUGAR on trail camera on Clinton Bates Rd, Calvin, Winn Parish, Louisiana.

     

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