Wildlife scientists asks international forums to protect tiger

Wildlife scientists asks international forums to protect tiger

Published by: Noor Khan
Published: Mon, 21 Sep 2009 at 15:40 ISTF

Dehra Dun, Sept 21: Concerned over the dwindling tiger population across the world, scientists at the Wildlife Institute of India (WWI) have asked the international forums to step in with new techniques immediately to protect the endangered bigcats.

The scientists appealed to the wildlife forums across the globe to bring new technologies in use to help preserve endangered species.

Speaking at a summit organised by the Institute, Global Tiger Forum President S C Dey said “the tiger population which was over one lakh in the beginning of the twentieth century has come down drastically.”

“It has now declined to a few thousands only,” he said, adding the ‘cheetah’ that could earlier be found in 17 African countries can now be found only in Namibia and Botsvana.

Pointing out the difficulties faced while counting the number of tigers and other wild animals, scientist Abhishek Harihar said that the camera-trap technique is not very efficient and a new method needs to be adopted.

Wildlife Institute of India Director Priyaranjan Sinha, said that the important suggestions at the summit for safeguarding and increasing the population of endangered species, should be brought into action.

http://www.samaylive.com/news/wildlife-scientists-asks-international-forums-to-protect-tiger/657953.html

https://bigcatrescue.org

How much did you like this?

Tags:

  • Show Comments (0)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *

You May Also Like

Texas: Animal seizure hearing delayed

By Robin Y. Richardson, News Messenger Friday, February 05, 2010 Testimony began Thursday in ...

TIGER-BONE WINE

TIGER-BONE WINE   Africa Geographic February 2009, by Ian Michler who investigates the murky ...

Tautphaus Park Zoo Tiger Dies

Tautphaus Park Zoo Tiger Dies Posted: Jan 27, 2010 07:07 PM EST A 16-year-old ...